Bias and Focus in Qualitative Research - Publish

Bias and Focus in Qualitative Research - Publish

Avoiding Bias and Developing Focus in Qualitative Research Setting aside our biases Bracketing, also called phenomenological reduction or the epoch, is extremely important. Bracketing means setting aside all our usual, "natural" assumptions about a phenomenon. Practically speaking, this means we must put aside our biases, prejudices, theories, philosophies, religions, even common sense, and accept a phenomenon for what it is. The following three exercises will help you to develop focus and to set aside your biases or

preconceptions so that you can pay attention to what your data are telling you. Exercise 1: Observing a phenomenon 1. Intuiting: Experience or recall a phenomenon. "Hold" it in your awareness, or live in it, be involved in it. Dwell in or on it. 2. Analyzing: Try looking for the following.

the pieces, parts, in the spatial sense; the episodes and sequences, in the temporal sense; the qualities and dimensions of the phenomenon. settings, environments, surroundings; the prerequisites and consequences in time; the perspectives or approaches one can take. cores or foci and fringes or horizons; the appearing and disappearing of the phenomena; the clarity of the phenomenon.

3. Describing: Write it down. Write it as if the reader had never had the experience. Guide them through your intuiting and analyzing. Exercise 2: Bracketing Your Biases First, make a list of your characteristics: 1. your gender; 2. your age; 3. your ethnic or national identification; 4. your religion or philosophy of life;

5. your political party or orientation; 6. your favourite psychological theory. Add four more characteristics: words or phrases that are descriptive of you as an individual. Bracketing (cont.) 1. List ways in which your characteristics might bias you in your efforts at research interviewing or observation. 2. Then write how you might counteract these biases. 3. And then write how these efforts to

counteract your biases might themselves lead to other biases! Exercise 3: Intensive Focus Exercise Describe a sensual experience. Describe the experience of eating a dried cranberry. Don't just use your recollection: Actually eat some, slowly, savouring the experience. See if you can get a paragraph or so of description. Take about 10 minutes. Then share your description with others.

Recently Viewed Presentations

  • The Man Who Named the Clouds - PC\|MAC

    The Man Who Named the Clouds - PC\|MAC

    How about taking them to whole new level! ... Then, using your context clues…write a synonym for each vocab word. Vocabulary. destruction. expected. We'll compare your work at the end of the lesson! Now…let's take a look at your new...
  • Faculty Leonard H. Calabrese, DO Professor of Medicine

    Faculty Leonard H. Calabrese, DO Professor of Medicine

    Leonard H. Calabrese, DO. Professor of Medicine. Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine . RJ Fasenmyer Chair of Clinical Immunology. Cleveland ClinicCleveland, Ohio. Edward Li, PharmD, MPH, BCOP . Associate Professor. Department of Pharmacy Practice . University of New England...
  • Valentine - WordPress.com

    Valentine - WordPress.com

    Sample intro "Valentine" by Carol Ann Duffy is a poem which deals with the common theme of love and romance in an unconventional manner. Duffy's use of poetic devices such as symbolism, word choice, structure and anti climax allows her...
  • drag and drop1 - Penang Free School

    drag and drop1 - Penang Free School

    Title: drag and drop1 Author: Jo Rhys-Jones / Joe Dale Keywords: Search Easter Eggs with Drag&Drop-Makro Description: Macro created by [email protected] Hans Werner Hofmann / Ute Simon
  • Nursery/Landscape ID

    Nursery/Landscape ID

    deep and rich green color year-round, foliage grows in flat sprays and, close up, the needles appear covered in fine green scales. astible. ... Black glands on tips of serrations. Cast iron plant. Evergreen shrub or clump. Parallel venation ....
  • Assessment and Management of Patients with Diabetes Mellitus

    Assessment and Management of Patients with Diabetes Mellitus

    Assessment and Management of Patients with Diabetes Mellitus By Linda Self Growing problem Estimated 7% of US population is diabetic Twice that many have prediabetes 21% of those over 60 have diabetes 45% of new diagnoses are being made in...
  • Design Speed - Kentucky Transportation Cabinet

    Design Speed - Kentucky Transportation Cabinet

    Design Speed. DESIGN SPEED Per revised NEW DESIGN MANUAL:KYTC HD-703. Design speed is a selected speed used to determine the various geometric features of the roadway. The selected design speed should be a logical one with respect to the anticipated...
  • Building Participation &Engaging Diverse Audiences

    Building Participation &Engaging Diverse Audiences

    Building Participation & Engaging Diverse Audiences Presented by: Matthew J. Ward, Chairman, Hudson Essex Passaic Soil Conservation District (NJ) Hudson Essex Passaic Soil Conservation District (NJ) The Hudson Essex Passaic Soil Conservation District (HEPSCD) in Northern NJ is a public...