CIS 736 (Computer Graphics) Lecture 6 of 30

CIS 736 (Computer Graphics) Lecture 6 of 30

Lecture 6 More Projections and Clipping and Introduction to OpenGL (Graphics Library) Friday, February 4, 2000 William H. Hsu Department of Computing and Information Sciences, KSU http://www.cis.ksu.edu/~bhsu Readings: Sections 3.12, 6.5-6.6, Foley et al Section 6.7, Hearn and Baker 2e Chapter 2, Sections 4.9, 5.7-5.8, 7.3-7.6, Angel 2e CIS 736: Computer Graphics Kansas State University Department of Computing and Information Sciences Lecture Outline Projections (Concluded) Review: 5-step normalizing transformation for perspective projection (Nper) Final operation in implementing view volume: clipping Clipping Lines (Introduction) Cohen-Sutherland algorithm Cyrus-Beck / Liang-Barsky algorithm

Clipping in 3D Extending 2D line clipping algorithms to 3D objects Sketch (more later): clipping in homogeneous coordinates Introduction to OpenGL (http://www.opengl.org, http://www.mesa3d.org) Graphics libraries: history and design rationale Specification of graphics libraries: application programmer interfaces (API) Key OpenGL functions Course Projects: Overview Next Lecture: More OpenGL, Introduction to Curves CIS 736: Computer Graphics Kansas State University Department of Computing and Information Sciences 3D Projections and Clipping Projections (Concluded) Parallel projection: cuboid view volume Perspective projection: truncated pyramidal view volume (frustum)

Problem: how to clip? Clipping Given: coordinates for primitives (line segments, polygons, circles, ellipses, etc.) Determine: visible components of primitives (e.g., line segments) Methods Solving simultaneous equations (quick rejection: testing endpoints) Solving parametric equations Objectives: efficiency (e.g., fewer floating point operations) Clipping in 3D Some 2D algorithms extendible to 3D Specification (and implementation) of view volumes needed Transparent Implementation in Graphics APIs: Later Today CIS 736: Computer Graphics Kansas State University Department of Computing and Information Sciences Normalizing Transformation for Parallel Projection

Npar: Transformation (Corresponding to Stack of Primitive Matrix Ops) 4-Step Transformation (Section 6.5.1, FVD) [1] VRP origin Translate at point to origin Purpose: normalization for impending rotation [2] Rotate (x, y, z) to (u, v, n) Align VRC with WC Purpose: normalize directional frame of reference according to viewer [3] Shear view volume Apply SHpar Purpose: align center line of view volume with z axis (Figure 6.49, FVD) [4] Translate and scale to canonical parallel cuboid Nonuniform scaling according to u/v range (Equation 6.35, FVD) Purpose: normalize dimensions of view volume (Equation 6.36, FVD) Result Npar = Spar Tpar SHpar R T(VRP) Equation 6.36, FVD) CIS 736: Computer Graphics Kansas State University Department of Computing and Information Sciences Normalizing Transformation for Perspective Projection

Nper: Transformation (Corresponding to Stack of Primitive Matrix Ops) 5-Step Transformation (Section 6.5.2, FVD) [1] VRP origin Translate at point to origin Purpose: normalization for impending rotation [2] Rotate (x, y, z) to (u, v, n) Align VRC with WC Purpose: normalize directional frame of reference according to viewer [3] COP origin Translate eye to origin Purpose: normalize position of reference according to viewer [4] Shear view volume Apply SHpar Purpose: align center line of view volume with z axis (Figure 6.53, FVD) [5] Scale to canonical perspective frustum Nonuniform scaling according to ratio of sheared-z to u/v range (Equation 6.39, FVD) Purpose: normalize dimensions of view volume (Equation 6.23, FVD) CIS 736: Computer Graphics Kansas State University Department of Computing and Information Sciences Clipping Lines Clipping (Sections 3.11-3.12, 6.5.3-6.5.4, FVD; Sections 7.2-7.6, Angel) Problem Input: coordinates for primitives

Output: visible components of primitives Equational solutions: simultaneous, parametric Basic primitive: clip individual points (test against rectangle bounds) Lines (Section 3.12, FVD; Section 7.3, Angel) Clipping line segment AB against viewing rectangle R General idea 1 (equational / regional approach) Divide plane into regions about R, see whether AB can possibly intersect Find intersections General idea 2 (parametric approach) Express line as parametric equation(s): 1 matrix or 2 scalar Find intersections by plugging into parametric equation (Table 3.1, FVD) Use to check clipping cases CIS 736: Computer Graphics Kansas State University Department of Computing and Information Sciences Cohen-Sutherland Algorithm General Idea 1 [Cohen and Sutherland, 1963] Divide plane into 9 regions about and including R See whether AB can possibly intersect Outcodes: Quick Rejection Method for Intersection Testing

Unique 4-bit binary number for each of 9 regions b0 = 1 iff y > ymax b1 = 1 iff y < ymin b2 = 1 iff x > xmax b3 = 1 iff x > xmax 1001 1000 1010 0001 0000 0010 0101 0100 0110 xmin Check clipping cases ymax ymin

xmax 8 floating-point subtractions per line segment, plus integer comparison Each line segment has 2 outcodes: o1, o2 Case 1: o1 = o2 = 0000 inside; show whole segment Case 2: o1 = 0000, o2 0000 (or vice versa) partly inside; shorten Case 3: o1 & o2 0000 totally outside; discard Case 4: o1 & o2 = 0000 both endpoints outside; check further! CIS 736: Computer Graphics Kansas State University Department of Computing and Information Sciences Cyrus-Beck and Liang-Barsky Algorithms General Idea 2 [Cyrus and Beck; Liang and Barsky] Express line as parametric equation(s): 1 matrix or 2 scalar Find intersections by plugging into parametric equation (Table 3.1, FVD) Use to check clipping cases Cyrus-Beck Algorithm Section 3.12.4, FVD More details next class (Lecture 7) Liang-Barsky Algorithm

Section 3.12.4, FVD; Section 7.3.2, Angel More details next class (Lecture 7) CIS 736: Computer Graphics Kansas State University Department of Computing and Information Sciences View Volumes in 3D: Perspective Frustum and Parallel Cuboid (xmax, ymax, zmax) (xmin, ymin, zmin) CIS 736: Computer Graphics Kansas State University Department of Computing and Information Sciences Generic Graphics Package: Overview Turn to Your Partners People in your row Groups numbered counterclockwise (left front to right front) Exercise 1 (Now): Generic Graphics Package

Objective: understanding generic graphics kernels Exercise (5 minutes): list 3 logical groups of functions that simple graphics kernels have 1 criterion for deciding whether kernel function should be implemented in hardware, software, or as macro Exercise 2 (Later Today): Specifying Graphics Transformations Objective: understanding shear transformation Specification of shear transformation function Implementation in OpenGL Exercise 3 (Later Today): Applying Graphics Transformations Objective: using shear to implement one type of parallel projection from another Enhancing capabilities of OpenGL CIS 736: Computer Graphics Kansas State University Department of Computing and Information Sciences In-Class Exercises (TTYP): Generic Graphics Package Graphics Kernels GKS PHIGS (FVD)

OpenGL Generic Graphics Package Specification Requirements analysis: deciding what to include Design of object model Implementation In hardware In software (part of kernel) As macros (part of kernel) By application programmer CIS 736: Computer Graphics Kansas State University Department of Computing and Information Sciences Generic Graphics Package: Typical Components TTYP Exercise 1a: Typical Components of Generic Graphics Kernels 1. Scan conversion 2. Transformations 3. Clipping 4. View specification / rendering 5. Texturing / mapping 6. 2-D primitives 7. Illumination

8. Color What Else? 1. Animation 2. Event handling (GUI) 3. Window management CIS 736: Computer Graphics Kansas State University Department of Computing and Information Sciences Generic Graphics Package: Specification TTYP Exercise 1b: Criteria for Implementation In hardware 1. Frequently used 2. Need fast implementation Library macro 1. Fast 2. Small, but frequently used In software (library function) 1. Save space (memory intensive), but not as frequently used 2. Portability (possibly platform / OS dependent) By applications programmer(s) 1. Infrequently used but important to end-user 2. Nonstandard techniques or requirements

How Else Can We Decide At What Level To Place Functions? 1. Cost issues: speed / frequency of use (generality of purpose) tradeoffs 2. Programming language: what are non-graphical primitives? CIS 736: Computer Graphics Kansas State University Department of Computing and Information Sciences History of Graphics Library (GL) Original GL (Graphics Library) Developed by Silicon Graphics, Inc. (SGI) Used with C under Irix (SGI Unix variant) Main platforms: SGI Indigo Later: SGI O2, Octane OpenGL Consortium See [Angel, 2000] and OpenGL sites Support under operating systems, IDEs (WinTel, Linux, MacOS, Amiga) Linux flavor: Mesa (http://www.mesa3d.org) 99% compliant version, supported by SGI Open source; licensing / validation fees not paid yet Recent (last 5-8 years) adoption for academic teaching, research

Web Resources Official OpenGL web site: http://www.opengl.org Porting guide, other SGI documentation: http://techpubs.sgi.com:80/library CIS 736: Computer Graphics Kansas State University Department of Computing and Information Sciences OpenGL: Overview of Utility Toolkit (GLUT) Graphics Library Utility Toolkit (GLUT) Chapter 2, Angel Supplements and related links: http://www.aw.com/cseng Links to web resources, code examples: http://www.cs.umn.edu/~angel Programs from book: ftp.cs.umn.edu (pub/angel/BOOK) General resources: http://www.opengl.org/Documentation/Documentation.html Color Chapter 13, FVD; Section 2.4, Angel More next month Viewing

Chapters 3 and 6, FVD; Section 2.5, Angel Tutorial: http://www.eecs.tulane.edu/www/Terry/OpenGL/Introduction.html Window System Chapter 9, FVD; Section 2.6, Angel More in second half of CIS 736 CIS 736: Computer Graphics Kansas State University Department of Computing and Information Sciences OpenGL: Transformation Matrices OpenGL Matrix Stack (Section 4.9, Angel) General syntax: glMatrixOperationf (parameters) Loading glLoadMatrixf (pointer-to-matrix) Special case: glLoadIdentity () Implicit parameter: currently loaded matrix e.g., glLoadIdentity (); glRotatef (90.0, 1.0, 0.0, 0.0); NB: convention postmultiplication (glMultMatrixf) Need LIFO: glPushMatrix, glPopMatrix /* 90 degrees roll */

Translation Syntax: glTranslatef (dx, dy, dz) Rotation Syntax: glRotatef (angle, vx, vy, vz) vx, vy, vz: roll, pitch, yaw components Scaling Syntax: glScalef (sx, sy, sz) Shearing: TTYP Exercise Write glShearf (parameters) CIS 736: Computer Graphics Kansas State University Department of Computing and Information Sciences OpenGL: Viewing API and Look-At Function Recall: Viewing Reference Coordinate (VRC) System Specification World coordinates (x, y, z) Viewing coordinates (u, v, n)

n view plane normal v projection of VUP (view-up vector), orthogonal to n, in view plane u third basis vector (orthogonal to n, v; can compute using cross product) Look-At Function (Section 5.2.3, Angel) Syntax: gluLookAt (eyex, eyey, eyez, atx, aty, atz, upx, upy, upz) eyex, eyey, eyez: specification of eyepoint e (COP aka view point aka position) atx, aty, atz: specification of at point a (view reference point aka VRP) upx, upy, upz: specification of view up vector (VUP) Properties of Viewing API VPN = e - a Specifies synthetic camera (as discussed last week) Now: Ready to Project CIS 736: Computer Graphics Kansas State University Department of Computing and Information Sciences OpenGL: Orthographic and Oblique Projections

Orthographic Projections in OpenGL (Section 5.7, Angel) Orthographic: only parallel projections provided by OpenGL Procedure glMatrixMode (GL_PROJECTION); glLoadIdentity (); glOrtho (-1.0, 1.0, -1.0, 1.0, -1.0, 1.0); /* canonical view volume */ General syntax: glOrtho (xmin, xmax, ymin, ymax, zmin near, zmax far) Implementing Oblique Projections Problem: OpenGL provides only pure orthographic projections Case where VPN (and projectors) || principal face normal Top, front, side elevations Solution Q: How to implement oblique projection using glOrtho? A: Use shear transformation (???, FVD; 5.7.2 Angel Homework 2) TTYP exercise: use your glShearf to do this CIS 736: Computer Graphics Kansas State University Department of Computing and Information Sciences OpenGL: ??? CIS 736: Computer Graphics

Kansas State University Department of Computing and Information Sciences Kansas State University Graphics Facilities KSU Graphics Infrastructure Accounts Computing and Information Sciences (CIS) department All students should already have logins Machines: KSU-CIS Beowulf cluster Software: Mesa (http://www.mesa3d.org) Systems Goodland Dual boot: Windows NT 4.0, Linux Matrox Millenium G400 (32Mb dual-head AGP) Priority given to CIS 736 students Instructional Linux systems: pending, 32Mb Pentium Beowulf cluster: pending, (2) quad Pentium III Xeon-500 For project use only Contact instructional staff to request packages CIS 736: Computer Graphics Kansas State University Department of Computing and Information Sciences

Course Project: Overview 3 Components Project proposal (20%, 50 points) Implementation (50%, 125 points) Final report (30%, 75 points) Project Proposal (Due 02/14/2000) 1-3 page description of project topic, plan Guidelines: next (suggested topics, tools to appear on CIS 736 course web page) See: implementation practicum links (Brown, Cornell, UNC, others) on 736 page Implementation Students choice of programming language Guidelines: next Wednesday (and on 736 page) Final Report 4-6 page report on implementation, experimental results, interpretation Peer-reviewed (does not determine grade) Reviews graded (short report worth 60 points, reviews worth 15 points) CIS 736: Computer Graphics

Kansas State University Department of Computing and Information Sciences Course Project: Proposal Guidelines Report Contents (1-3 Pages) Scope: What kind of CG algorithms will you use? Problem: What display problem are you addressing? Methodology: How are you addressing the problem? Scope What rendering, animation, and visualization tools (or codes) will you use? What characteristics of the display tools are you trying to deal with / exploit? Problem Objective: What is your display objective? Evaluation: How will you demonstrate (and measure) success? Methodology Implementation: What will you implement? (general statement, not specification) Graphics data representation: How will you manipulate and represent CG data? Infrastructure: What programming languages and platform(s) will you use?

CIS 736: Computer Graphics Kansas State University Department of Computing and Information Sciences Terminology Normalizing Transformations Npar: normalizing transformation for parallel projection (6.5.1, FVD) Nper: normalizing transformation for perspective projection (6.5.2, FVD) M: conversion matrix from perspective to parallel view volume (6.5.4, FVD) Nper = M Sper SHpar T(PRP) R T(VRP) (Equation 6.49, FVD) Clipping: Determining Parts of Primitives to Display Cohen-Sutherland: line clipping algorithm Division of plane into 9 regions with (4-bit) outcodes Testing endpoints of line segment Parametric clipping: line / rectangle intersection using parametric equation Cyrus-Beck: general convex 3D polyhedron Liang-Barsky: more efficient, specialized variant (upright 2D, 3D clip regions) Clipping in 3D Cuboid: truncated viewing pyramid used to clip after Npar

Frustum: truncated viewing pyramid OpenGL: Multiplatform, Standardized Graphics Library and API CIS 736: Computer Graphics Kansas State University Department of Computing and Information Sciences Summary Points Projections: Review of Nper [1] VRP origin [2] Rotate (x, y, z) to (u, v, n) [3] COP origin [4] Shear view volume [5] Scale to canonical perspective frustum Clipping Lines: Cohen-Sutherland, Liang-Barsky (Cyrus-Beck) Clipping in 3D

Introduction to OpenGL (http://www.opengl.org, http://www.mesa3d.org) Graphics libraries: history, design rationale, specification, APIs Key OpenGL functions Course Projects: Overview Next Lecture More OpenGL (Sections 10.1-10.6, Angel) Intro to cubic curves (11.1, 11.2.1-11.2.2, FVD; 10.6-10.8, Hearn and Baker) CIS 736: Computer Graphics Kansas State University Department of Computing and Information Sciences

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