Concept English Units and Lessons:

Concept English Units and Lessons:

Concept English Units and Lessons: Planning and the Common Core Presented by Andy Flaherty November 11, 2014 Progress lies not in enhancing what is, but in advancing toward what will be. Khalil Gibran Protocols for the Day Actively listen and ask questions Restate original ideas and explain your reasoning Respond, dont react

Critique the idea, not the person Turn cells off and do not respond to emails Planning vs. Procedure UbD Teaching/Learning Units and lesson are designed by teachers Bulk of today SIS Procedural/Managerial Place where units/lessons are collected and reviewed

by administrators Review at the end The old way Traditional design is like Setting out on a trip and not knowing where you are going (what skills) and not knowing how you will know when you get there Traditional design follows

textbooks reading series ...favorite themes The problem But many teacher begin with and remain focused on textbooks, favored lessons, and time-honored activities the inputs rather than deriving those means from what is implied in the desired results the output. To put it in an odd way, too many teachers focus on the teaching and not the learning. Understanding by Design (UbD) Its thinking about assessment before deciding how

to teach, planning instruction, what resources will be used and finally and most importantly How will the student prove she/he has learned the target? The Standards How many are there? What do they all share? What do they say about literacy? Which two are in all Smarter Balanced tests? What are the shifts implicated? The Standards Activity 1

10 minutes 1. Read the standard you have been given and: Identify patterns or repeating words Restate it or paraphrase it. Share out to whole group Craft and Structure Sub-heading RI.6.5 RI.8.5 RI.9-10.5

Analyze how a particular sentence, paragraph, chapter, or section fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of ideas. Analyze in detail how an authors ideas or claims are developed and refined by particular sentences,

paragraphs, or larger portions of text (e.g., a section or chapter). Analyze in detail the structure of a specific paragraph in a text, including the role of particular sentences in developing and refining a key concept. Language Standards

Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence or paragraph; a word's position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase. Use the relationship between particular words to better understand each of the words. Key Words in the Standards ELA K- 5 ELA 6-12 Understanding 33 Analyze 73

Read 28 Determine Write 22 Develop 41 Demonstrate 19

Research 50 33 Clarify 18 Clarify 32 Develop

18 Write 31 Produce 17 Relationships 30 Relationships Describe

16 14 Compare/Contrast 13 Demonstrate 28 Understanding Create 26 27

Shifts* As the Result of Common Core 1. Regular practice with complex texts and its academic language. COMPLEXITY 2. Reading, writing, and speaking grounded in evidence from the text both literary and informational. EVIDENCE 3. Building knowledge through content-rich nonfiction. KNOWLEDGE *From achievethecore.org and PARCC The use of questions 1. Using the question you have been given:

Activity 2 10 minutes Convert question to statement Identify important synonyms Ask yourself what is enduring? 3 Stages of Design Identify desired results Determine acceptable evidence Plan learning experiences and instruction

Stage One: Identify Desired Results Elements of the Design: Goals, Knowledge and Skills, Essential Questions, Enduring Understandings Key Elements Goals Knowledge and Skills

Enduring Understanding Essential Questions Wiggins, G. and McTighe, J. (1998). Understanding by Design. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development Goals The Goals for each unit are typically the national, state, and/or local standards. Often represent specific content objectives that must be met for a particular grade level or subject. Wiggins, G. and McTighe, J. (1998). Understanding by Design. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum

Development Knowledge and Skills Objectives/standards that students should be able to know and do, in other words I can statements. Specific English content knowledge and skills. Wiggins, G. and McTighe, J. (1998). Understanding by Design. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development Knowledge or Understanding UbD assumes you want to move beyond knowledge to understanding: Knowledge = Facts Understanding = Meaning of Facts

Essential Questions Open-ended questions that are thought-provoking and interpretive. Essential Questions are at the core of your content and often leads to, or requires further investigation. Essential Questions: Have no obvious right answer Raise more questions Address concepts that are key to the discipline Wiggins, G. and McTighe, J. (1998). Understanding by Design. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development Enduring Understandings

Enduring Understandings: are Big Ideas that can be transferred and made into statements. Uncover abstract or misunderstood ideas Reveals ideas Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe advance that there are Six Facets of Understanding. When the facets are a part of the curriculum, students

are able to obtain true understanding. Wiggins, G. and McTighe, J. (1998). Understanding by Design. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development Six Facets of Understanding Explanation Sophisticated explanation and theories Interpretation Narratives, translations, metaphors, etc. that provide meaning

Application Ability to effectively apply knowledge in a variety of contexts Perspective Critical and insightful points of view. Recognize the significance of ideas Empathy Ability to see things from other points of view Self-Knowledge

Deeply aware of own boundaries and ability to recognize the limits of others Wiggins, G. and McTighe, J. (1998). Understanding by Design. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development Facets of Understanding Activity 3 15 minutes Think-Pair-Share 1. Think Read the handout and pull the strips of paper from the envelop separating the questions, performance

tasks, and teaching strategies. 2. Think Match the questions, tasks, and strategies with the right definition of understanding. 3. Pair with your partner read your responses and modify based on your discussion. 4. Share have one person share ideas with the whole group. 5. Create a 6 Facets Wall of Understanding. Knowledge vs. Understanding Knowledge

The facts A body of coherent facts Verifiable claims Right and wrong I know something to be true I respond on cue with what I know Understanding The meaning of the facts

The theory that provides coherence and meaning to those facts Fallible, in-process theories A matter of degree or sophistication I understand why it is, what makes it knowledge I judge when to and when not to use what I know Implications Identifying significant concepts/big ideas leads to deep and meaningful learning Big ideas/enduring understandings will help teachers prioritize learning

Essential questions become the doorway to learning Scaffolding changes to instruction based on enduring understanding will lead to more effective differentiation Units will have more design/composition Ideas will become more transferable Your Grade Level Unit 1. Looking at what you Activity 4 15 minutes brought: Identify the enduring understanding

Formulate an essential question Link it to a standard (s) Examples of Performance Tasks: Explanation Write letters home describing what the pioneer life is really like compared to you expected. Interpretation Compare English and Spanish versions of Cinderella to determine if language influences meaning.

Application Adapt events from history that contributed to societal reaction to the Civil Rights Movement by recreating a scene and presenting to a group. Perspective Debate whether the First Amendment could negatively impact a group by participating in a roundtable discussion with classmates. Empathy Create a diary that reflects the day in the life of an electron.

Self-Knowledge Write a self-assessment reflecting on your writing process. Three-ring Audit Process What concepts should be students be familiar with Worth Being Familiar With Important to Know and Do

Anchors the unit; Why is this topic worth studying What important knowledge and skills must students have for mastery Enduring Understanding Wiggins, G. and McTighe, J. (1998). Understanding by Design. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development

Three-ring Audit Process Assessments Traditional quizzes or tests Worth Being Familiar With Important to Know and Do Constructed or selected responses Authentic

Enduring performance tasks Understanding and projects Wiggins, G. and McTighe, J. (1998). Understanding by Design. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development Stage Two: Determine Acceptable Evidence G.R.A.S.P.S. Stage 2: Determine Acceptable Evidence This stage identifies specific assessments that will

be used. Identify the summative assessment What is the culminating activity that will represent the Understandings students have gained from the unit. Use G.R.A.S.P.S. to plan performance tasks. Wiggins, G. and McTighe, J. (1998). Understanding by Design. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development Examples of Assessment Types Tests/Quizzes Academic

Prompts Observations /Dialogues Acceptable Evidence Performance Tasks Informal Checks for Understanding

G.R.A.S.P.S Performance Task Scenario G= R= A= S= P= S= Goal Role Audience Situation Product/Performance and Purpose

Standards for Criteria and Success Wiggins, G. and McTighe, J. (1998). Understanding by Design. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development Stage Three: Plan Learning Activities W.H.E.R.E.T.O. Wiggins, G. and McTighe, J. (1998). Understanding by Design. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development Stage Three: Plan Learning Activities This is the Stage where specific learning activities (lessons) are planned to

accompany each unit. The lessons designed in this stage are should be based on the desired results from Stage 1 and 2. W.H.E.R.E.T.O. is an acronym for planning steps to help meet the requirements of the unit. The acronym does not represent the order to be followed Wiggins, G. and McTighe, J. (1998). Understanding by Design. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development Lesson Plans Activity 5

5 minutes Close Reading What is an Effective Lesson? 1. Read the one page excerpt 2. As you read: a. Underline b. Circle c. Summarize in a sentence W.H.E.R.E.T.O. W Where are we going? What is expected?

H How will we hook the students? E How will we equip students for expected performances? R How will we rethink or revise? E How will students self-evaluate and reflect their learning?

T How will we tailor learning to varied needs, interests, and learning styles O How will we organize the sequence of learning? Wiggins, G. and McTighe, J. (1998). Understanding by Design. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development Balanced Literacy Framework Reading Workshop

Writing Workshop Word Study Literacy Components: Three-Block Framework Gradual Release of Responsibility Fisher and Frey Focus lesson: teacher establishes purpose of lesson & models own thinking Guided instruction: teacher questions,

prompts, cues students to facilitate their thinking about topic Collaborative learning: students work together, using academic language to complete a task Independent learning: students SIS Unit and lesson are plan storage Examples in SIS Who is your audience? How do they find you?

What should it look like? http://csforms.conceptschools.org/Login.aspx?reason=Inactivity&pa ge=% 2fDashboard.aspx Lesson Plans in SIS WORKSHOP Designing Your Unit Activity 6 1 hour As you are working consider these design tip if a student was asked:

1. What are you doing? 2. Why are you being asked to do this? 3. What will it help you do? 4. How does it fit with what you have done previously? 5. How will you show what you have learned? Research Based Strategies Brooks/Flaherty Activity 6 30 minutes 1. Read and annotate the excerpt provided. 2. Follow the Marzano

strategy on the next slides including oral directions. From The Astronauts Wives Club ReadWorks.org A new book called The Astronaut Wives Club by Lily Koppel, has changed that. Koppels bestseller tells the stories of the strong women behind the men who pioneered space travel. The book begins in the late 1950s, when a mans family is seen as a reflection of his work life: a good home with a pretty wife and adorable children translated into a good career. An important part of an astronaut's wife's job was to maintain the perfect image of domestic happiness. Astronaut wives were pressured by NASA, their husbands, and their own sense of duty to display an outward image of family perfection. They had to smile their way through dealing with the fears for their spouses' safety and the challenges of maintaining a home

and children with almost no help. It was a difficult path, but also served as the basis for the strong friendships that grew between the women. The astronauts wives were in it together. The Houston suburbs where the wives made a home for their heroic husbands were called the Spaceburbs, or sometimes Togethersville. Along with triumph, the town was also the scene of tragedy. Seven of the first 30 astronaut wives lost their husbands during the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo missions. After astronaut Ed White perished in a capsule blaze, his wife Pat fell into deep depression. In an interview with the author, another astronaut wife described Mrs. White: She just worked at being Ed's wife. She was wonderful at it. That's all. Question #1 Part A With your partners answer How does the passage describe the wives of Americas first astronauts?

A. Examples of mental and physical excellence B. Perfect American wives and homemakers C. Strong, courageous, and independent D. Overwhelmed by responsibility and pressure Question #1 Part B With your new partner highlight evidence from the text that supports the answer you chose. Question #2 What is this passage mostly about? A. Movies about famous space missions, such as Apollo 13 B. The problems and difficulties faced by American astronauts C. The strong wives who supported the first astronauts

D. The Houston spaceburbs where astronauts families lived. Summarize Write a 2 sentence summary about the passage you have just read. Closure I must define the unit, the lesson in a way more engaging than engorging, countering my tendency to inundate students with data, and allowing them instead to encounter the subject, each other, and themselves I must create exercises that invite students to probe the unknown, as well as exercises that reveal what they have learned.

Parker Palmer

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