Exam structure - Ruffles Revision

Exam structure - Ruffles Revision

Exam structure Women and Society 11 Compare the ways in which the writers of your two chosen texts make use of different voices. You must relate your discussion to relevant contextual factors. (Total for Question 11 = 40 marks) OR 12 Compare the ways in which the writers of your two chosen texts portray womens relationships with men. You must relate your discussion to relevant contextual factors. (Total for Question 12 = 40 marks) Summary A Thousand Splendid Suns is about what was happening in Afghanistan for the last thirty years with the Soviet invasion and the Taliban. Its starts off with Mariams life and then continuously switches between Lailas. Mariam leaves and her Mum hangs herself. Shes forced to marry Rasheed and they move away to Kabul. Laila is introduced and her relationship with Tariq. Tariqs Family moves due to the war. Lailas father convinces her mother to move but they end up getting killed.

Mariam and Rasheed find her, and she moves in with them and then marries Rasheed. Laila finds out she is pregnant but with Tariqs child (Aziza). Her and Mariam try to escape but are caught and beaten by Rasheed. Laila has another child but this time it is Rasheed's (Zalmai). Rasheed beats Laila and almost kills her, but Mariam saves her and kills Rasheed. She is sent to jail but then gets killed by the Taliban. Laila and Tariq move to Murree and then end up moving back to Kabul. About the Author: Khaled Hosseini Born in Kabul, Afghanistan 1965 Father worked for Afghan Foreign Ministry constantly moved around due to violent political instability Mother was a teacher of Persian Literature gained passion for this poetry Family moved to California in 1980 Hosseini would graduate high school in Cali. and college with an M.D. 1st Novel: The Kite Runner, 2003 Any obvious links to

2nd Novel: A Thousand Splendid Suns, 2007 Women or Society? Both are highly acclaimed best-sellers Title Inspiration: Came from a poem by 17th century Persian poet Saib-e-Tabrizi Every street of Kabul is enthralling to the eye Through the bazaars, caravans of Egypt pass One could not count the moons that shimmer on her roofs And the thousand splendid suns that hide behind her walls Any obvious links to Women or Society? Political Circumstances: Main conflicts in switching governments: modernizing Afghan culture

or keeping with old traditional ways (i.e. women being allowed education, wearing burqas) Soviet Union also infiltrating (basically want more power geographically) Taliban is one reactionary group which gained strong control throughout Afghanistan In a war-ridden country, many people took refuge in the neighboring countries of Pakistan and Iran Make a link Character, Key Moment, Quote, Setting or Symbol Marriage Rights: Polygamy is socially accepted Wives expected to do domestic chores Generally wives all live in the same house Certainly not all men were abusive to wives but public would generally turn heads to obvious abuse Men could choose how they wanted their wives to behave burqa, go out in public alone, etc.

Make a link Character, Key Moment, Quote, Setting or Symbol Women: Before the Taliban take over, womens role in society was beginning to modernize (in more urban areas) Allowed education Dress code was lightened could wear just a loose scarf over head, could wear lipstick, nail polish, high heels Voting rights granted in select areas With the Taliban, women basically lose all forms of freedom. Make a link Character, Key Moment, Quote, Setting or Symbol Under the Taliban: Aim was to secure environments where the chasteness and dignity of women may once again be sacrosanct,"

Forced to wear Burqa face of a woman is a source of corruption. Could not be in public without male escort. The Taliban Continued: Not allowed to work Could not be educated past age 8 Could only read Koran Not allowed to be treated by doctors unless escorted led to diseases that never got treated Women were publicly punished if they broke these laws beaten, shot, hanged, stoned Countless more inhumanities suffered upon the Afghan women Make a link Character, Key Moment, Quote, Setting or Symbol Afghanistan Today Now titled the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan has a president and a parliament.

International powers are trying to help reform the political infrastructure, although Taliban and other insurgent groups still have considerable power. Small gains in womens rights have been made (right to vote), but certainly no where close to the freedoms that women in our world have. Remains a very unstable environment where many people live in constant fear. Make a link Character, Key Moment, Quote, Setting or Symbol Chapter ___ A Thousand Splendid Suns Jalil had three wives and nine children, nine legitimate children, all of whom were strangers to Mariam. He was one of Herat's wealthiest men. He owned a cinema, which Mariam had never seen, but at her insistence Jalil had described it to her, and so she knew that the faade was made of blue-and-tan terra-cotta tiles, that it had private balcony seats and a trellised ceiling. Double swinging doors opened into a tiled lobby, where posters of Hindi films were encased in glass displays. On Tuesdays, Jalil said one day, kids got free ice cream at the concession stand. A01 What do we learn about Women? Nana smiled demurely when he said this. She waited until he had left the kolba, before snickering and saying, "The children of strangers get ice cream. What do you get, Mariam? What do we learn about Society?

Stories of ice cream." In addition to the cinema, Jalil owned land landother in Farah, three carpet stores, a clothing shop, and a black 1956 Buick Roadmaster. He was one of Herat's best-connected in Karokh, What key themes are presented? men, friend of the mayor and the provincial governor. He had a cook, a driver, and three housekeepers. AO2 Nana had been one of the housekeepers. Until her belly began to swell. What

language there? When that happened, Nana said, the collective gasp of Jalil's family sucked thefeatures air out of Herat.are His in-laws swore blood would flow. The wives demanded that he throw her out. Nana's own father, who was a lowly stone carver in the nearby village of Gul Daman, disowned her. Disgraced, he packed his things and boarded a bus to Iran, never to be seen or What structural features are there? heard from again. "Sometimes," Nana said early one morning, she was feeding the chickens outside the kolba, my father had had the stomach to sharpen one of his knives and do the asWhat literary

devices are"I wish used? honorable thing. It might have been better for me." She tossed another handful of seeds into the coop, paused, and looked at Mariam. "Better for you too, maybe. It would have What Motifs are developed? spared you the grief of knowing that you are what you are.key But he symbols was a coward, myor father. He didn't have the dil, the heart, for it." Jalil didn't have the dil either, Nana said, to

do the honorable thing. To stand up to his family, to his wives and in-laws, and accept responsibility for what he had done. Instead, AO3 behind closed doors, a face-saving deal had quickly been struck. The next day, he had made her gather her few things from the servants' quarters, where she'd been living, and sent her off. What contextual links can we make? "You know what he told his wives by way of defense? That I forced myself on him. That it was my fault. Didi? You see? This is what it means to be a woman in this world." Nana put AO4 down the bowl of chicken feed. She lifted Mariam's chin with a finger. "Look at me, Mariam." What connections to Tess are there? Reluctantly, Mariam did. Nana said, "Learn this now and learn it well, my daughter: Like a compass needle that points north, a man's accusing finger always finds a woman. Always. You remember that, Mariam." AO1, AO2, AO3 + AO4 Jalil had three wives and nine children, nine legitimate children Use of numbers Cinema - motif Ice cream symbol

Jalil owned land in Karokh, land in Farah, three carpet stores, a clothing shop, and a black 1956 Buick Roadmaster. Asyndetic listing belly began to swell alliteration and negative imagery the collective gasp of Jalil's family sucked the air out of Herat. His in-laws swore blood would flow. Metaphor disowned her Context/Tess sharpen one of his knives and do the honourable thing. Ambiguity/Irony Dil - Dialect/Context face-saving deal had quickly been struck. Metaphor/Context That it was my fault. Didi? You see? This is what it means to be a woman in this world Rhetorical/Tess Like a compass needle that points north, a man's accusing finger always finds a woman. Simile/Tess Chapter ___ A Thousand Splendid Suns Jalil had three wives and nine children, nine legitimate children, all of whom were strangers to Mariam. He was one of Herat's wealthiest men. He owned a cinema, which Mariam had never seen, but at her insistence Jalil had described it to her, and so she knew that the faade was made of blue-and-tan terra-cotta tiles, that it had private balcony seats and a trellised ceiling. Double swinging doors opened into a tiled lobby, where posters of Hindi films were encased in glass displays. On Tuesdays, Jalil said one day, kids got free ice cream at the concession stand. Nana smiled demurely when he said this. She waited until he had left the kolba, before snickering and saying, "The children of strangers get ice cream. What do you get, Mariam? Stories of ice cream."

In addition to the cinema, Jalil owned land in Karokh, land in Farah, three carpet stores, a clothing shop, and a black 1956 Buick Roadmaster. He was one of Herat's best-connected men, friend of the mayor and the provincial governor. He had a cook, a driver, and three housekeepers. Nana had been one of the housekeepers. Until her belly began to swell. When that happened, Nana said, the collective gasp of Jalil's family sucked the air out of Herat. His in-laws swore blood would flow. The wives demanded that he throw her out. Nana's own father, who was a lowly stone carver in the nearby village of Gul Daman, disowned her. Disgraced, he packed his things and boarded a bus to Iran, never to be seen or heard from again. "Sometimes," Nana said early one morning, as she was feeding the chickens outside the kolba, "I wish my father had had the stomach to sharpen one of his knives and do the honorable thing. It might have been better for me." She tossed another handful of seeds into the coop, paused, and looked at Mariam. "Better for you too, maybe. It would have spared you the grief of knowing that you are what you are. But he was a coward, my father. He didn't have the dil, the heart, for it." Jalil didn't have the dil either, Nana said, to do the honorable thing. To stand up to his family, to his wives and in-laws, and accept responsibility for what he had done. Instead, behind closed doors, a face-saving deal had quickly been struck. The next day, he had made her gather her few things from the servants' quarters, where she'd been living, and sent her off. "You know what he told his wives by way of defense? That I forced myself on him. That it was my fault. Didi? You see? This is what it means to be a woman in this world." Nana put down the bowl of chicken feed. She lifted Mariam's chin with a finger. "Look at me, Mariam." Reluctantly, Mariam did. Nana said, "Learn this now and learn it well, my daughter: Like a compass needle that points north, a man's accusing finger always finds a woman. Always. You remember that, Mariam."

Chapter ___ A Thousand Splendid Suns A01 The women in this part of Kabul were a different breed from the women in the poorer neighborhoods--like the one where she and Rasheed lived, where so many of the women What do we learn about Women? covered fully. These women were--what was the word Rasheed had used?--"modern." splendid sunsdo wemindlearn Society? Yes, modern Afghan women married to modern Afghan men who a thousand What did not that theirabout wives walked among strangers with makeup on their faces and nothing on their heads. Mariam watched them cantering uninhibited down the street, sometimes with a man, sometimes alone, sometimes with rosy-cheeked children who wore What key spokes--unlike themestheare

presented? shiny shoes and watches with leather bands, who walked bicycles with highrise handlebarsother and gold-colored children in Deh-Mazang, who bore sand-fly scars on their cheeks and rolled old bicycle tires with sticks. AO2 These women were all swinging handbags and rustling skirts. What language features are there? Mariam even spotted one smoking behind the wheel of a car. Their nails were long, polished pink or orange, their lips red as tulips. They walked in high heels, and quickly, as if on What structural features are there? perpetually urgent business. of their perfume. literary devices used? They wore dark sunglasses, and, when they breezed by, Mariam caught a whiffWhat

She imagined that they allare had university degrees, that they worked in office buildings, behind desks of their own, where they typed and smoked and made important telephone calls to important people. These women mystified Mariam. What key symbols or Motifs are developed? They made her aware of her own lowliness, her plain looks, her lack of aspirations, her ignorance of so many things. AO3 Then Rasheed was tapping her on the shoulder and handing her something. What contextual links can we make? "Here." AO4 It was a dark maroon silk shawl with beaded fringes and edges embroidered with gold thread. What connections to Tess are there? "Do you like it?" Mariam looked up. Rasheed did a touching thing then. He blinked and averted her gaze. Exam topics

Mariam thought of Jalil, of the emphatic, jovial way in which he'd pushed his jewelry at her, the overpowering cheerfulness that left room for no response but meek gratitude. Nana had been right about Jalil's gifts. They had been halfhearted tokens of penance, insincere, corrupt gestures meant more for his own appeasement than hers. This shawl, Mariam saw, was a true gift. "It's beautiful," she said. Ext: Turn your annotations into an ICEBERG, then a PEEL. Chapter ___ A Thousand Splendid Suns "Rasheed didnt notice her coming back into the room. He was still on top of Laila, his eyes wide and crazy, his hands wrapped around her neck. Lailas face was turning blue now, and her eyes ha rolled back. Mariam saw that she was no longer struggling. Hes going to kill her, she thought. He really means to. And Mariam could not, would not, allow that to happen. Hed taken so much from her in twenty-seven years of marriage. She would not watch him take Laila too. Mariam steadied her feet and tightened her grip around the shovels handle. She raised it. She said his name. She wanted him to see. 'Rasheed.' He looked up. Mariam swung.

She hit him across the temple. The blow knocked him off Laila. Rasheed touched his head with the palm of his hand. He looked at the blood on his fingertips, then at Mariam. She thought she saw his face soften. She imagined that something had passed between them, that maybe she had quite literally knocked some understanding into his head. Maybe he saw something in her face too, Mariam thought, something that made him hedge. Maybe he saw some trace of all the self-denial, all the sacrifice, all the sheer exertion it had taken her to live with him for all these years, live with his continual condescension and violence, his faultfinding and meanness. Was that respect she saw in his eyes? Regret? But then his upper lip curled back into a spiteful sneer, and Mariam knew then the futility, maybe even the irresponsibility, of not finishing this. If she let him walk now, how long before he fetched the key from his pocket and went for that gun of his upstairs in the room where hes locked Zalmai? Had Mariam been certain that he would be satisfied with shooting only her, that there was a chance he would spare Laila, she might have dropped the shovel. But in Rasheeds eyes she saw murder for them both. And so Mariam raised the shovel high, raised it as high as she could, arching it so it touched the small of her back. She turned it so the sharp edge was vertical, and, as she did, it occurred to her that this was the first time that she was deciding the course of her own life. And, with that, Mariam brought down the shovel. This time, she gave it everything she had." Chapter ___ A Thousand Splendid Suns "Laila examined Mariam's drooping cheeks, the eyelids that sagged in tired folds, the deep lines that framed her mouth-she saw these things as though she too were looking at someone for the first time. And, for the first time, it was

not an adversary's face Laila saw but a face of grievances unspoken, burdens gone un-protested,a destiny submitted to and endured. If she stayed, would this be her own face, Laila wondered, twenty years from now?" Chapter ___ A Thousand Splendid Suns "'What good are all your smarts to you now? What's keeping you off the streets, your smarts or me? I'm despicable? Half the women in this city would kill to have a husband like me. They would kill for it.' He looked back and blew smoke toward the ceiling. 'You like big words? I'll give you one: perspective. That's what I'm doing here, Laila. Making sure you don't lose perspective' What turned Laila's stomach the rest of the night was that eery word Rasheed had uttered, every last one, was true." Chapter ___ A Thousand Splendid Suns "When Zalmai was born, Rasheed had moved him into the bed he shared with Laila. He had bought him a new crib and had lions and crouching leaopards paointed on the side panels. He'd paid for new clothes, new rattles, new bottles, new diapers, even though they could not afford them and Aziza's old ones were still serviceable." Chapter ___ A Thousand Splendid Suns "'Everybody wants Jack,' Laila said to Mariam. 'That's what it is. Everybody wants Jack to rescue them from disaster. But there is no Jack. Jack is not coming back. Jack is dead.''

Mariams kolba is still here. Chapter ___ A Thousand Splendid Suns When she approaches it, Laila sees that the lone window pane is empty and that the door is gone. Mariam had described a chicken coop and a tandoor, a wooden outhouse too, but Laila sees no sign of them. She pauses at the entrance to the kolba. She can hear flies buzzing inside. To get in, she has to sidestep a large fluttering spider web. Its dim inside. Laila has to give her eyes a few moments to adjust. When they do, she sees that the interior is even smaller than shed imagined. Only half of a single rotting splintered board remains of the floorboards. The rest, she imagines, have been ripped up for burning as firewood. The floor is carpeted now with dry-edged leaves, broken bottles, discarded chewing gum wrappers, wild mushrooms, and old yellowed cigarette butts. But mostly with weeds, some stunted, some springing impudently halfway up the walls. Fifteen years, Laila thinks. Fifteen years in this place. Laila sits down, her back to the wall. She listens to the wind filtering through the willows. There are more spider-webs stretched across the ceiling. Someone has spray-painted something on one of the walls, but much of it has sloughed off, and Laila cant decipher what it says. Then she realizes the letters are Russian. There is deserted birds nest in one corner and a bat hanging upside down in another corner, where the wall meets the low ceiling. Laila closes her eyes and sits there awhile. In Pakistan, it was difficult sometimes to remember the details of mariams face. There were times when, like a word on the tip of her tongue, Mariam's face eluded her. But now, here in this place, its easy to summon Mariam behind the lids of her eyes: the soft radiance of her gaze, the long chin, the coarsened skin of her neck, the tight lipped smile. Here, Laila can lay her cheek on

the softness of Mariams lap again; can feel Mariam swaying back and forth, reciting verses from the Koran, can feel words, vibrating down Mariam's body, to her knees, and into her own ears. Then, suddenly, the weeds begin to recede, as if something is pulling them by the roots from beneath ground. They sink lower and lower until the earth in the kolba has swallowed the last of their spiny leaves. The spider-webs magically unspin themselves. The birds nest self-disassembles, the twigs snapping loose one by one, flying out of the kolba end over end. An invisible eraser wipes the Russian graffiti off the walls. The floorboards are back. Laila sees a pair of sleeping cots now, a wooden table, two chairs, a cast-iron stove in the corner, shelves along the walls, on which sit clay pots and pans, a blackened teakettle, cups and spoons. She hears chickens clucking outside, the distant gurgling of the stream. A young mariam is sitting at the table making doll by the glow of an oil lamp. Shes humming something. Her face is smooth and youthful, her hair washed, combed back. She has all her teeth. Laila watches mariam glue strands of yarn onto her dolls head. In a few years, this little girl will be a woman who will make small demands of life, who will never burden others, who will never let on that she too has had sorrows, disappointments, dreams that have been ridiculed. A woman who will be a rock in a riverbed, enduring without complaint, her grace not sullied but shaped by the turbulence that washes over her. Already Laila sees something behind this little girls eyes, something deep in her core, that neither Rasheed nor the Taliban will be able to break. Something as hard and unyielding as a block of limestone. Something that, in the end, will be her undoing and Laila's salvation. Perspective Told from two different womens perspective at different points in their lives. Mariam- illegitimate child of a rich man and a housekeeper- 15 years old when story starts Laila- child of loving and progressive parents- believes in womans education and rights- 9 years old when story starts Story divided into 4 parts:

1. Mariam 2. Laila 3. Switches between Mariam/Laila 4. Laila Provides a compelling view of Afghan society from two very different women as their journeys through life collide unexpectedly Themes Inner strength of women Enduring the unendurable Finding hope in midst of despair Discovering strength in an unlikely companion Human capacity for evil Loyalty and devotion Archetypes: Good vs. Evil The cast-out child

Female suppression Star-crossed lovers Controlling husband Tragic Hero Comparison: Tess vs Thousand Splendid Would you rather live as a women in Tess world or the Thousand Splendid World? Discuss/Answer/Support Summary A Thousand Splendid Suns is about what was happening in Afghanistan for the last thirty years with the Soviet invasion and the Taliban. Its starts off with Mariams life and then continuously switches between Lailas. Mariam leaves and her Mum hangs herself.

Shes forced to marry Rasheed and they move away to Kabul. Laila is introduced and her relationship with Tariq. Tariqs Family moves due to the war. Lailas father convinces her mother to move but they end up getting killed. Mariam and Rasheed find her, and she moves in with them and then marries Rasheed. Laila finds out she is pregnant but with Tariqs child (Aziza). Her and Mariam try to escape but are caught and beaten by Rasheed. Laila has another child but this time it is Rasheed's (Zalmai). Rasheed beats Laila and almost kills her, but Mariam saves her and kills Rasheed. She is sent to jail but then gets killed by the Taliban. Laila and Tariq move to Murree and then end up moving back to Kabul. Summary Tess Durbeyfield lives in the rural village of Marlott in southwest England. She first appears performing the May-Day dance, where she exchanges a meaningful glance with a young man named Angel Clare. Tess's family is very poor, but her father learns that he is descended from the d'Urbervilles. Tess mistakenly causes the death of Prince, the family's horse, she feels guilty enough to try and claim kin from some wealthy d'Urbervilles nearby, unaware that they aren't actually related. Alec, the libertine son of old, blind, Mrs. d'Urberville, becomes infatuated with Tess and repeatedly tries to seduce her, but she rebuffs his advances.

Alec tricks Tess into accepting a ride home with him. He gets lost in the woods and leaves to find the path. When he returns he finds Tess asleep, and he rapes her. Tess then returns to Marlott, and later gives birth to Alec's child. She avoids the other townspeople out of shame. Her baby soon gets sick, and Tess worries about his soul. She baptizes him herself, and names him Sorrow before he dies. After a while Tess gets worn down by her community's judgment and decides to look for work elsewhere. She becomes a milkmaid at Talbothays dairy farm, and enjoys a time of contentment. She meets Angel Clare, who asks her to marry him, but Tess refuses, feeling that she is not worthy of marriage. She is afraid to tell him the details of her past. She eventually accepts but when she reveals the truth about her past Angel is distraught. He cancels the wedding, gives Tess some money and leaves for Brazil. Tess soon runs out of money. Tess randomly meets Alec d'Urberville again, but now he has become an evangelical preacher, converted by Angel's father. When he sees Tess he becomes enamoured once more, and quickly gives up Christianity to try and seduce her. Tess goes home to care for her mother, but soon afterward her father dies. The family is then evicted, and Alec offers to help them if Tess will return to him Meanwhile Angel, who has grown sick in Brazil, decides to come home and forgive Tess. When he finally finds her she is in a fancy boardinghouse, and she says it is too late for her, she has relented to Alec. Angel leaves, stricken, and Tess argues with Alec, ultimately stabbing him to death. Tess and Angel then escape together, with Angel unsure if Tess actually committed murder. On the run, they stop at Stonehenge, and Tess falls asleep on a monolith. At dawn the police arrest her. Later Angel and Tess's sister, Liza-Lu, hold hands and watch the black flag, the sign that Tess has been executed.

Exam structure Women and Society 11 Compare the ways in which the writers of your two chosen texts make use of different voices. You must relate your discussion to relevant contextual factors. (Total for Question 11 = 40 marks) OR 12 Compare the ways in which the writers of your two chosen texts portray womens relationships with men. You must relate your discussion to relevant contextual factors. (Total for Question 12 = 40 marks) Comparison Matrix 3 stages of comparison Identify and explore similarities and differences - Today Analyse the writers intentions. Evaluate which writer is the most successful and why.

Women and Society: Connection s Power Control Human rights Relationships with Men Gender roles/Stereotypes Voices Prejudice Revolution/Rebellion Corruption Patriarchy Family Love/Marriage

Independence Religion Motherhood Fatherhood Femininity Sex Domestic Abuse Death Reputation Instability Fate Other connections

Symbols Motifs Quotes Archetypes Stereotypes Structure Women and Society: Comparison Matrix Characters Things the character share in common

Tess and Thousand - Similarities Similar impact of context Context Themes Similar messages delivered about the same theme Other connections

Symbols Motifs Quotes Archetypes Stereotypes Structure Women and Society: Comparison Matrix Characters How characters are

different Tess and Thousand - Differences Different impact of context Context Themes Different messages on the same theme Women and Society: Connection

s Power Control Human rights Relationships with Men Gender roles/Stereotypes Voices Prejudice Revolution/Rebellion Corruption Patriarchy Family Love/Marriage Independence Religion Motherhood Fatherhood

Femininity Sex Domestic Abuse Death Reputation Instability Fate Analysis and Evaluation What message is each writer delivering? Which writer is more successful and why? Gender roles/Stereotypes 1. 2. 3. 4.

Comparison What Gender Roles/Stereotypes have we got? What messages about Gender Roles is Tess delivering? What messages about Gender Roles is Thousand delivering? Which Writer is doing a better job? Why? Evaluation Comparison + Analysis Gender roles/Stereotypes 1. What Gender Roles/Stereotypes have we got? Women as Mothers - Both Domesticated Housewives 1,000 Women as Sex objects - Both Women as pure/virginal - Both Men as the head of the family Both (1,000)

Men as strong/brave/Heroic - Neither Tess, Thousand, Both or Neither? Gender roles/Stereotypes 2. What messages about Gender Roles is Tess delivering? 3. What messages about Gender Roles is Thousand delivering? Women as Mothers Isolation/Struggle vs Suffering/responsibility/Expectation Domesticated Housewives Women as Sex objects Women as pure/virginal Men as the head of the family

Men as strong/brave Gender roles/Stereotypes Which Writer is more effective/impactful when delivering their ideas? Women as Mothers Domesticated Housewives Women as Sex objects Women as pure/virginal Men as the head of the family Men as strong/brave 11 Compare the ways in which the writers of your two chosen texts portray the corruption of patriarchal societies. You must relate your discussion to relevant contextual factors. Area of Comparison Similarity

Difference Character Context Other Othello essays A01 Logical and developed arguments - Harry A02 Focused analysis - Chloe A05 Engaging with the critic Aanand 1. Engaging with the Critic does it support your argument? Is it a valuable insight? 2. Better introductions remember answers and outline. 3. Poor Conclusions Summarise and Evaluate. 4. Dont forget A02 Good quotes, not always used. 5. Dont forget A03 Not loads of Context Jacobean or Elizabethan?

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