Friday, November 20, 2015

Homework: perhaps NONE? Complete political cartoon assignment? Review Ch. 26, 12.1 notes? OHP product sharing? Monday, December 7, 2015 I. Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day Display NOTES on 5 postwar tensions-?? II. Oral History Project Continue sharingfinish by Wednesday? Sacco & Vanzetti clemency hearing is later this week. Ch. 13 section quiz early next weektest is LATER next week Individual Ch. 12 & 13 QUIZ (major) is planned for final week of December. ROARING 1920s

Celebrity Dance PARTY is Wed., December 23rd!!! Homework: perhaps NONE? Complete political cartoon assignment? Review Ch. 26, 12.1 notes? OHP product sharing? Tuesday-Wednesday, December 8-9, 2015 Oral History Project Continue sharingfinish by Wednesday? Sacco & Vanzetti clemency hearing is later this week. Ch. 13 section quiz early next weektest is LATER next week Individual Ch. 12 & 13 QUIZ (major) is planned for final

week of December. ROARING 1920s Celebrity Dance PARTY is Wed., December 23rd!!! Criteria Interviewees experience Student Research Collaboration Product Conventions Advanced Demonstrates sophisticated understanding of interviewees

experience in historical context. Proficient Demonstrates understanding of interviewees experience in historical context. Basic Demonstrates limited understanding of interviewees experience in historical context. -Attempts to retell interviewees story (minimally engaging and/or informative) 24-20 Demonstrates limited understanding of the historical time period. Uses 2 sources Material is cited

Below Basic Demonstrates little to no understanding of interviewees experience in historical context. -Highly informative & engaging retelling of interviewees story 35-32 -Informative & engaging retelling of interviewees story 31-25 Demonstrates sophisticated understanding of the historical time period. Uses 5 or more sources. Multiple citations in MLA format Demonstrates understanding of the historical time period. Uses 3 4 sources

Citations in MLA format -Excellent analysis of research compared to participants testimony (displays many insightful connections) 35-32 -Analysis of research compared to participants testimony is satisfactory (displays insightful several connections) 31-25 -Inadequate analysis of research & participants testimony (displays few insightful connections) 24-20 -Little or no analysis of research or participants testimony (displays no

meaningful connections) 19-0 Student actively works with peers and contributes to their success. 10-9 Student collaborates with peers but has minimal impact on their success. 8-7 Student has minimal collaboration with peers. Student does not collaborate with anyone. Media chosen is highly effective in engaging and connecting to audience.

Media chosen is effective in engaging and connecting to audience. Media chosen is somewhat effective in engaging and connecting to audience. 6 Media chosen is ineffective in engaging and connecting to audience. 10-9 Questions, bibliography, and product show evident control of grammar, mechanics, and spelling 10-9 8-7 Questions, bibliography, and

product show sufficient control of grammar, mechanics, and spelling. 8-7 Questions, bibliography and product show limited control of grammar, mechanics, and spelling. 6 Questions, bibliography, and product show minimal control of grammar, mechanics, and spelling. _____/35 points -Inadequate and/or ineffective retelling of interviewees story 19-0 Demonstrates little to no understanding of the historical time period.

Uses 1 source There are no citations 6 5-0 _____/35 points _____/10 points 5-0 _____/10 points /points 5-0 Comments: Total: ______/100

Very nicely done! A well-deserved advanced rating Good overall effortmore research and/or interview analysis needed, but still high proficient work Acceptable product, but research and/or interview analysis needed much more attention/effort (SCL is recommended.submit enhanced work within 10 days) INCOMPLETE product! Research and interview analysis are inadequate SCL is HIGHLY RECOMMENDED FILE NAME: 1 LEVANT TOPIC?? 1 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 1 2 3

4 5 6 7 8 9 C A V S Period 1 Presentation ordersharing expectations Ccontent knowledge Era/event EXPLAINED? Aanalysis: interview vs. research Interview COMPARED to history?

Vvisual/product Project LOOK good/show EFFORT? Sspeaking/delivery skills Was OHP sharing ENGAGING? FILE NAME: 1 ADAMS TOPIC?? 2 22 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 C Period 2 A V S Presentation ordersharing expectations Ccontent knowledge Era/event EXPLAINED? Aanalysis: interview vs. research Interview COMPARED to history?

Vvisual/product Project LOOK good/show EFFORT? Sspeaking/delivery skills Was OHP sharing ENGAGING? FILE NAME: 1 BURN TOPIC?? 3 20 21 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 Period 3 C A V S Presentation ordersharing expectations Ccontent knowledge Era/event EXPLAINED? Aanalysis: interview vs. research Interview COMPARED to history? Vvisual/product Project LOOK good/show EFFORT?

Sspeaking/delivery skills Was OHP sharing ENGAGING? FILE NAME: 1 STANTON TOPIC?? 4 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22

23 24 25 26 27 28 1 2 3 4 5 6 C A V S Period 4 Presentation ordersharing expectations Ccontent knowledge

Era/event EXPLAINED? Aanalysis: interview vs. research Interview COMPARED to history? Vvisual/product Project LOOK good/show EFFORT? Sspeaking/delivery skills Was OHP sharing ENGAGING? Period 6 Presentation ordersharing expectations FILE NAME: 1 JENKINSON TOPIC?? 6 C 8 9

10 11 12 13 14 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 A V S Ccontent knowledge Era/event EXPLAINED? Aanalysis: interview vs. research Interview COMPARED to history?

Vvisual/product Project LOOK good/show EFFORT? Sspeaking/delivery skills Was OHP sharing ENGAGING? Homework: READ Americans Ch. 13 section, complete ttt blanks & record 10+ notes by Monday, 12/14 Reminders: political cartoon assignment? OHP sharing or SCL? Wednesday, December 9, 2015 I. Oral History Project Continue sharingfinish today? II. Begin Sacco & Vanzetti Clemency Hearing Voting for Governor? Preparation for testimony Sacco & Vanzetti clemency hearing is later this week. Ch. 13 section quiz early next

weektest is LATER next week Individual Ch. 12 & 13 QUIZ (major) is planned for final week of December. ROARING 1920s Celebrity Dance PARTY is Wed., December 23rd!!! Chapter 13:The Roaring Life of the 1920s (p. 432-461) 1. the attempt to make the sale of alcohol illegaland the conflict 3. Through national

between and and science symbolized in the . , radio, , the mass media helped create a national culture. trial both reveal the clash between new and traditional values in the 1920s. 4. Among the personal achievements of the were the of

2. There were more work opportunities for Claude McKay, Langston Hughes, and Zora Neale women in the 1920s than in prior years, but Hurston; the they faced and unequal treatment. Women were becoming more independent and assertive. In their home lives, women more often were free to choose their own husbands, although the divorce rate . They had fewer enjoyed many housework easier. . They

that made of Paul Robeson; and the of Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, and Bessie Smith. Chapter 13: The Roaring Life of the 1920s (p. 432-461) 1. Prohibitionthe attempt to make the sale of alcohol illegaland the conflict between fundamentalism and science symbolized in the Scopes trial both reveal the clash between new and traditional values in the 1920s. 2. There were more work opportunities for women in the 1920s than in prior years, but they faced discrimination and unequal treatment. Women were becoming more independent and assertive. In

their home lives, women more often were free to choose their own husbands, although the divorce rate increased. They had fewer children. They enjoyed many conveniences that made housework easier. 3. Through national magazines, radio, and movies, the mass media helped create a national culture. 4. Among the personal achievements of the Harlem Renaissance were the writings of Claude McKay, Langston Hughes, and Zora Neale Hurston; the acting of Paul Robeson; and the music of Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, and Bessie Smith. Criteria Interviewees experience Student

Research Collaboration Product Conventions Advanced Demonstrates sophisticated understanding of interviewees experience in historical context. Proficient Demonstrates understanding of interviewees experience in historical context. Basic Demonstrates limited understanding of interviewees experience in

historical context. -Attempts to retell interviewees story (minimally engaging and/or informative) 24-20 Demonstrates limited understanding of the historical time period. Uses 2 sources Material is cited Below Basic Demonstrates little to no understanding of interviewees experience in historical context. -Highly informative & engaging retelling of interviewees story 35-32 -Informative & engaging retelling of interviewees story

31-25 Demonstrates sophisticated understanding of the historical time period. Uses 5 or more sources. Multiple citations in MLA format Demonstrates understanding of the historical time period. Uses 3 4 sources Citations in MLA format -Excellent analysis of research compared to participants testimony (displays many insightful connections) 35-32 -Analysis of research compared to participants testimony is satisfactory (displays insightful

several connections) 31-25 -Inadequate analysis of research & participants testimony (displays few insightful connections) 24-20 -Little or no analysis of research or participants testimony (displays no meaningful connections) 19-0 Student actively works with peers and contributes to their success. 10-9 Student collaborates with peers but has minimal impact on their success.

8-7 Student has minimal collaboration with peers. Student does not collaborate with anyone. Media chosen is highly effective in engaging and connecting to audience. Media chosen is effective in engaging and connecting to audience. Media chosen is somewhat effective in engaging and connecting to audience. 6 Media chosen is ineffective in engaging

and connecting to audience. 10-9 Questions, bibliography, and product show evident control of grammar, mechanics, and spelling 10-9 8-7 Questions, bibliography, and product show sufficient control of grammar, mechanics, and spelling. 8-7 Questions, bibliography and product show limited control of grammar, mechanics, and spelling. 6

Questions, bibliography, and product show minimal control of grammar, mechanics, and spelling. _____/35 points -Inadequate and/or ineffective retelling of interviewees story 19-0 Demonstrates little to no understanding of the historical time period. Uses 1 source There are no citations 6 5-0 _____/35 points _____/10 points

5-0 _____/10 points /points 5-0 Comments: Total: ______/100 Very nicely done! A well-deserved advanced rating Good overall effortmore research and/or interview analysis needed, but still high proficient work Acceptable product, but research and/or interview analysis needed much more attention/effort (SCL is recommended.submit enhanced work within 10 days) INCOMPLETE product! Research and interview analysis are inadequate SCL is HIGHLY RECOMMENDED Components of the OHP PRODUCT I. Introduction (give detailed background info of the time period: Cold War, WW II, 1950s culture, Vietnam, etc. include timelines, maps, images, video clips, etc.)

Convert 2-paragraph into background section! II. Body: Explain persons experiences related to your time period (era or event) in detail (results of most of your interview questions should be included) III. Comparison Section: Compare the interview information to your own knowledge of the time period, including as much historical detail as possible (cited sources!) (Demonstrate understanding of interviewees experience in historical context) ANALYZE & retell the story vs. research in your product IV. Conclusion: Summarize the effect that the era or event had on your interviewees life REFLECTIONsummary & lasting impressions? (Write a thank you letter to you interviewee & consider sharing a copy of your product) OHP product due on or before Tuesday, 12/1! OHP Product Students will create a final product that demonstrates their understanding of the interviewees experience in historical context. Please choose from the following options: A PowerPoint presentation or Podcast A short narrative / biography

A documentary Other product as approved by the teacher All products should: Demonstrate an understanding of the historical event or era. Incorporate specific information from the interview. Place the interviewees experiences in historical context. Interest and engage the audience. Demonstrate effort and quality work. OHP Timeline Do the following: Include ACTUAL testimony (text, audio, and/or video) from the interview Analyze, compare/contrast, and/or REFLECT on the historical research AND the persons testimony PICTURE of your person (like a baseball card with bio info) Include LOTS of relevant images, maps, timelines, etc. to make it LOOK NICE! Be creative and original, but FOLLOW INSTRUCTIONS, the RUBRIC, and LEARN from the SAMPLES! ASK for help!

Pecha Kucha? http://www.pechakucha.org/ http://www.pechakucha.org/faq http:// www.usc.edu/dept/education/CMMR/Pecha_ Kucha_TipsResourcesExamples.pdf Homework: READ Americans Ch. 13 section & record 10+ notes by Monday, 12/14 Continue prep & reflection on Clemency Hearing! (Re-read 26, 12.1) Reminders: political cartoon assignment? OHP sharing or SCL? Thursday-Friday, December 10-11, 2015 Sacco & Vanzetti Clemency Hearing Why are we here TODAY? Students will participate in the Ch. 26 History Alive! clemency hearing for Sacco & Vanzetti. Sacco and Vanzetti

A hotly protested criminal trial, held from 1920 to 1927, in which Italian immigrants Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti were convicted of robbing and murdering two men and sentenced to death; many people believed that the trial was unfair and that the defendants were prosecuted because they were anarchists, not because they were guilty. In the summer of 1927, Alvan Fuller, the governor of Massachusetts, held the lives of two

men in his hands. Six years earlier, Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti had been found guilty of committing a double murder and robbery and were condemned to die. Fuller appointed Abbott Lawrence Lowell, president of Harvard University, to investigate whether the men deserved clemency [clemency: the act of lessening a punishment] , or a lessening of their penalty. The Lowell Committee began by asking, Had the Sacco and Vanzetti trial been fair? Sacco and Vanzetti were Italian immigrants in a time of great prejudice against foreigners. In addition, both men had fled to Mexico in 1917 rather than serve in the army. The prosecutor's first question to Vanzetti in the trial was, "When this country was at war, you ran away so you would not have to fight as a soldier?" This question may have turned trial judge Webster Thayer and the jury against the defendants. Defense attorney Fred Moore argued that there was no clear evidence tying his clients to the murders. Sacco's gun fired the type of bullets used to kill the two men, but tests could not prove the bullets came from his weapon. A cap at the scene was said to be Sacco's, but it did not fit him. There was even less evidence tying Vanzetti to the crime. Moore claimed the two men were being tried because they were immigrants who had radical political beliefs. When the jury returned a guilty verdict, many people questioned the decision. During the next six years, concern over the verdict spread as Judge Thayer rejected all legal appeals on Sacco and Vanzetti's behalf. There were demonstrations in London, Buenos Aires, and other world capitals. The Sacco and Vanzetti trial raised fundamental questions about America's founding

Preparing for Sacco & Vanzetti trial simulation Students they will soon determine the fate of Sacco and Vanzetti by participating in a clemency hearing before Governor Alvan Fuller and the Lowell Committee. Students work with their groups to prepare the responses to the questions on their Role Cards. Students in the Lowell Committee place their desks in the front of the room so they can see all the groups. Act-it-out Clemency Hearing Groups with Role Cards 27 choose one person to testify for their group. Students in the Lowell Committee begin the hearing by following the instructions on Role Card 1calling the ACLU witness. After all group witnesses have testified, LISTEN as Bartolomeo Vanzetti testifiesaudio! The Lowell Committee will deliberate and decide

whether Sacco and Vanzetti should be granted clemency. Governor Fuller will present the verdict to the class. You be the judge! Reasons they may be NOT guilty? Reasons they do NOT deserve a reduction in their sentence or a pardon (freedom)? T-chart (found on the causes & effects worksheet), plus your Chapter 26 5 TENSIONS worksheet, including clemency hearing notes/observations, will be checked for QUALITY & further completion. Use notes & hearing facts to construct a well-developed paragraph to Gov. Fuller & the Lowell committee expressing your OPINION on the Sacco & Vanzetti case. Was justice served? Before our clemency hearing begins.

Bartolomeo Vanzetti (above with moustache) and Nicola Sacco (right, SANS stache) The Lowell Committee American Civil Liberties Union After coming to the United States, Nicola Sacco and Bartolome Vanzetti struggled to make a living. Sacco worked for a construction company as a water boy and a "pick-andshoveler." He made as little as $1.15 a day for backbreaking labor. After 12-hour shifts at work, he spent three nights a wee studying English. Eventually, he found a job as a shoemaker, which paid better. At the Milford Shoe Company, he earned between $30 and $40 a week. As soon as World War I ended, the federal government canceled its contracts with weapons manufacturers. Hundreds of thousands of factory workers were laid off. At the same time the army released nearly 4 million soldiers. The result was massive unemployment and an economic recession.

Vanzetti had a harder life than Sacco. Over the years, he worke as a dishwasher, a bricklayer, a cook, and a factory hand in an iron mill. At the time of his arrest, he was selling fish from a car that he pushed through the streets. None of his jobs ever paid enough for him to buy a home, wear nice clothes, or marry. Still, Sacco and Vanzetti did have jobs. In the years just after Nativists Industrial Workers of the World I.W.W. Headquarters After Palmer Raid, 1919 In late 1919, following a period of labor turbulence and several bombing incidents, post-World War I antiradical hysteria reached fever pitch. In November 1919, Attorney General A. Mitchell Palmer launched a series of raids targeting the most vulnerable radical and progressive organizations. By early 1920, more than five thousand people were arrested in what became known as the "Palmer Raids." Goldman's Mother Earth office was among the first to be ransacked in 1917. Rumor has it that J. Edgar Hoover used her confiscated library and manuscripts to educate himself on the radical Left. Apparently, most of the material was later destroyed. (IWW headquarters, New York City, after the raid of November 15, 1919. Special Collections Library, Labadie Collection, University of Plymouth Cordage Company

Like many workers after World War I, Sacco and Vanzetti were union men. Sacco and his wife, Rosina, acted in plays to raise money for striking workers. Vanzetti helped organize a strike at the Plymouth Cordage Company, where he worked as a rope maker. He urged immigrant groups to support labor unions. The dedication of the two men to the union movement was one reason working-class communities later raised money for East Boston Anarchists Organization Nicola Sacco became an anarchist while working in a shoe factory. Bartolomeo Vanzetti learned about anarchism while working at a rope factory. The two met in 1917, when they fled to Mexico to escape the military draft. When they

returned to Massachusetts, they joined an East Boston anarchists' group. Vanzetti later boasted, "Both Nick and I are anarchiststhe radical of the radical." On the night of their arrest, both were carrying guns. Sacco also had a pamphlet advertising an anarchist rally at which Vanzetti would speak. After their trial, many came to believe that Sacco and Vanzetti had been convicted because of their radical politics. Official in the Palmer Raids I.W.W. Headquarters After Palmer Raid, 1919 In late 1919, following a period of labor turbulence and several bombing incidents, post-World War I antiradical hysteria reached fever pitch. In November 1919, Attorney General A. Mitchell Palmer launched a series of raids targeting the most vulnerable radical and progressive organizations. By early 1920, more than five thousand people were arrested in what became known as the "Palmer Raids." Goldman's Mother Earth office was among the first to be ransacked in 1917. Rumor has it that J. Edgar Hoover used her confiscated library and manuscripts to educate himself on the radical Left. Apparently, most of the material was later destroyed. (IWW headquarters, New York City, after the raid of November 15, 1919. Special Collections Library, Labadie Collection, University of

The police investigating the South Braintree robbery had little to go on except eyewitness accounts of two bandits who "looked Italian." Three weeks later, the police arrested Sacco and Vanzetti. When searched, the suspects were found to be carrying pistols and ammunition. When questioned, they lied about where they had been and how they had obtained their guns. Their behavior made them look suspicious to the police and, later, to a jury. But during this troubled time, some native-born Americans eyed many immigrantsespecially those who were poor and spoke little English with suspicion. This demonstration on behalf of Sacco and Vanzetti took place in London, England. As the execution date drew near, mass protests took place across Europe. In the United States, the case reflected deep social divisions. To many native-born

Americans, Sacco and Vanzetti represented an alien threat to their way of life. To many immigrants, Sacco and Vanzetti were fellow victims of prejudice against newcomers. Stuff You Missed in History Class Podcast: How the Sacco and Vanzetti Trial Worked http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cl3_5X_FLwI Sacco (left) and Vanzetti (right) http://www.democracynow.org/20 07/8/22/sacco_and_vanzetti_80_y ears_after The Historic Verdict(s) Was justice served? On July 27, 1927, six years after Sacco and Vanzetti were convicted of murder, the Lowell Committee concluded that the trial of the two men had been fair and that clemency for Sacco and Vanzetti was unjustified. That was all Governor Alvan Fuller needed. He ignored pleas to save the lives of Sacco and Vanzetti. Just after midnight on August 23, 1927, the two men were strapped into electric chairs and executed. Decades after the executions, doubts remain about the guilt of Sacco and

Vanzetti. Modern crime analysis confirms that Saccos gun was used to kill one of the victims, which suggests that Sacco was guilty. But no proof was ever found to link Vanzetti to the murders. Most scholars who have studied the incident have concluded that Vanzetti was innocent. You be the judge! Reasons they may be NOT guilty? A cap at the murder scene did not fit Sacco. They were hard workers who were able to maintain jobs during the postwar period. They were two of millions of Americans who participated in labor strikes during the period. Most anarchists were peaceful. The eyewitnesses were biased and said the bandits looked Italian. Most poor immigrants were viewed with suspicion during the

period. Reasons they do NOT deserve clemency? They dodged the draft in WW I. Crime was commonplace during the postwar years. Vanzetti organized labor strikes, and Sacco raised money for striking workers. They were both carrying guns on the night of their arrest. Sacco had an advertisement for an anarchist rally in his pocket. Upon their arrest, they lied about where they had been. Your verdict? = 1-paragraph Essay RUBRIC Write a paragraph to submit to Governor Alvan Fuller and the Lowell Committee. Choose one founding ideal and describe whether it was advanced or restricted during the postwar period. Explain how the advancement or

restriction of this ideal may have helped or hurt Sacco and Vanzetti in their trial. Persuasion: Write passionately about the American ideal and use the Sacco and Vanzetti trial facts & details to voice your OPINION to Governor Fuller & the Lowell Committee. Adv. (9-10) : extremely convincing arguments & evidence; committee was clearly right or wrong Prof. (7-8): somewhat convincing arguments & evidence; committee questioned (may be right or wrong) Basic (6 or less): minimal arguments and/or evidence; little attempt to address the committee (may lack awareness of task) Historical Content: Utilize the trial & hearing facts and details to support your view and explain the impact on your selected American ideal. Adv. (15-13) : precise details utilized effectively to evaluate impact on selected American ideal and Sacco & Vanzetti legal case Prof. (12-11): adequate details utilized to evaluate the impact on selected American ideal and Sacco & Vanzetti legal case Basic (6 or less): minimal details improperly used to evaluate the impact on selected American ideal and Sacco & Vanzetti legal case Conventions/Details: Write clearly using proper spelling, grammar, sentence structure (1-pg. max.), plus VISUAL. Adv. (9-10) : excellent writing with few or no errors; well-developed 1-page paragraph and appropriate picture(s) Prof. (7-8): effective writing with minor errors; 1-page paragraph and/or picture NOT exemplary (may be missing) Basic (6 or less): largely ineffective writing with many errors; minimally-developed paragraph; picture is inappropriate or missing a clear thesis that states your position? two pieces of evidence that support your topic sentence? an explanation of how each piece of evidence supports your topic sentence? Americas Founding Ideals: equality, rights, liberty, opportunity, democracy

Your verdict? = 1-paragraph Essay RUBRIC Write CONCISELY8-10 LINES maximum!!! Write a paragraph to submit to Governor Alvan Fuller and the Lowell Committee. Choose one founding ideal and describe whether it was advanced or restricted during the postwar period. Explain how the advancement or restriction of this ideal may have helped or hurt Sacco and Vanzetti in their trial. Persuasion: Write passionately about the American ideal and use the Sacco and Vanzetti trial facts & details to voice your OPINION to Governor Fuller & the Lowell Committee. Follow the same task, but LIMIT the verbiage in Adv. (9-10) : extremely convincing arguments & evidence; committee was clearly right or wrong your committee written argument. Prof. (7-8): somewhat convincing arguments & evidence; questioned (may be right or wrong) Basic (6 or less): minimal arguments and/or evidence; little attempt to address the committee (may lack awareness of task) PREPARE to square off AGAINST someone with an

Adv. (15-13) : precise details utilized effectively to evaluate impact on selected American ideal and Sacco & Vanzetti legal case opposing viewpoint. Prof. (12-11): adequate details utilized to evaluate the impact on selected American ideal and Sacco & Vanzetti legal case Historical Content: Utilize the trial & hearing facts and details to support your view and explain the impact on your selected American ideal. Basic (6 or less): minimal details improperly used to evaluate the impact on selected American ideal and Sacco & Vanzetti legal case THANK you for your willingness to see the other side! Conventions/Details: Write clearly using proper spelling, grammar, sentence structure (1-pg. max.), plus VISUAL. Adv. (9-10) : excellent writing with few or no errors; well-developed 1-page paragraph and appropriate picture(s) Prof. (7-8): effective writing with minor errors; 1-page paragraph and/or picture NOT exemplary (may be missing) Basic (6 or less): largely ineffective writing with many errors; minimally-developed paragraph; picture is inappropriate or missing 1 = CLEMENCY verdict for your class is JUSTICE! 2 = Clemency VERDICT for your class is an injustice! a clear thesis that states your position? two pieces of evidence that support your topic sentence? an explanation of how each piece of evidence supports your topic sentence?

Americas Founding Ideals: equality, rights, liberty, opportunity, democracy Clemency hearing results 2015 Period 1: Period 2: Period 3: Period 4: Period 6: Sacco executed, clemency (pardon) for Vanzetti clemency, 10 total years in prison clemency, 15 additional years (21 total) Sacco (4 additional yrs), Vanzetti pardoned Was justice served? What makes you so sure they got it WRONG and you got it right? 2014 Period 2clemency, DEPORTATION

Period 3clemency, 5 years in low security prison with eligibility for parole Period 4clemency, 30 years Period 5clemency, PARDONED Period 6clemency, life in prison 2013 Period 1: Period 3: Period 4: Period 5: Period 6: clemencysentence commuted to 20 years in prison clemencysentenced reduced to 15 years Sacco & Vanzetti Trial via British Law School clemencylife in prison clemency15 years clemency5 years, RELEASED for time served Causes of Economic Problems The economy had been centered around war production. The government had no plans

for demobilization. Overnight, the federal government canceled its wartime contracts. The army discharged nearly 4 million veterans, flooding the labor market. Effects of Economic Problems Hundreds of factories closed. Millions of Americans were thrown out of work. The standard of living decreased. The economy lapsed into recession. Crime increased. Causes of Labor Problems The federal government no longer encouraged good labor relations.

Corporations reduced wages. Corporations paid less attention to employee safety. The workday increased to 12 hours. Effects of Labor Problems Many Americans joined unions for the first time. Strikes erupted across the country. Supreme Court decisions diminished the power of unions. Workers lost economic ground. Causes of Political Problems In April 1919, authorities discovered 36 bombs and blamed them on radicalism. Americans feared radical groups such as socialists,

communists, and anarchists. In June 1919, eight bombs went off simultaneously in eight cities, one of them targeting Attorney General Mitchell Palmer. Effects of Political Problems Attorney General Palmer launched the Red Scare, a campaign against subversives. During the Palmer Raids, homes and businesses were raided and thousands of radicals were arrested. Some 30 states passed sedition laws. Subversive books were removed from libraries. Mobs attacked suspected radicals. The civil liberties of citizens were violated.

Effects of Social Problems Causes of Social Problems The Emergency Immigration Act of 1921 instituted Immigration to the United States a quota system. increased during the early postwar The Immigration Act of 1924 further limited period. immigration from southern and eastern Europe and Many new immigrants were from banned immigration from Asia. The Ku Klux Klan was revived and used violence to southern and eastern Europe. Nativists called for restrictions in intimidate targeted groups. The Klan openly marched in major cities to show immigration. their strength and endorse political candidates. Union members favored tighter The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) was immigration laws. created to protect the freedom of speech for all people. The ACLU took on challenging cases, such as the Sacco and Vanzetti case.

Causes of Racial & Religious Problems Asian immigrants faced severe legal discrimination. Some states prohibited Asian immigrants from owning land and marrying whites. African Americans faced continuing racism. African American veterans had trouble finding employment. Lynching made a comeback in the South. Anti-Semitism continued during the postwar period. Catholics were targets of religious prejudice. Effects of Racial & Religious Problems Tensions between whites and blacks erupted into nationwide race riots in the summer of 1919. Marcus Garvey created the Back-toAfrica movement, urging African Americans to leave the racist society

of the United States. The Anti-Defamation League was created to fight for an end to antiSemitism. Americas Postwar Issues, Struggles, & Tensions History Alive! Ch. 26: Understanding Postwar Tensions (p. 331-341) Following World War I, America faced 5 distinct types of problems. IDENTIFY the types of problems, then describe specific examples & details, including vocabulary words, in the spaces provided. The Americans Ch. 12: 1 Politics of the Roaring Twenties (p. 410-418) Understanding Postwar Tensions Americas Problems, Struggles & Issues after WW I History Alive! Ch. 26, p. 331-340 There were 5 types of problems in the US: -Emerging Economic Tensions -Rising Labor Tensions

-Growing Political Tensions -Increasing Social Tensions -Enduring Racial & Religious Tensions As you examine the images & info to follow, ENHANCE your notes As soon as World War I ended, the federal government canceled its contracts with weapons manufacturers, like this one in New Jersey. Hundreds of thousands of factory workers were laid off. At the same time, the army released nearly 4 million soldiers. The result was massive unemployment and an economic recession. Like many workers after World War I, Sacco and Vanzetti were union men. A poorly planned demobilization resulted in an economic recession after World War I. As unemployment rose, living standards for all but the richest Americans declined.

When soldiers and sailors shipped home from Europe at the wars end, they found the nation in economic distress. Government employment posters, like the one above, encouraged employers to hire veterans. But the jobs simply did not exist. demobilization: the act of discharging forces from military service or use recession: a period in which there is a decline in economic activity and prosperity In 1919, unions staged more than 3,600 strikes across the country, creating the greatest wave of labor unrest in the nation's history. In January 1919, nearly every worker in Seattle, Washington, went on strike over wages and

working conditions. For five days, most economic activity in the city halted. Despite public fear of food shortages and revolution, neither came to pass. Strike-related violence, such as shown here, fueled some Americans fears that radical union activity might lead to revolution. Public fear of radicals contributed to unions decline. American Federation of Labor (AFL) dominant force in the union movement. a group of unions representing skilled workers, such as machinists or mechanics, organized by their craft. best known for "bread and butter" unionism. It concentrated on improving wages and working conditions for its union members.

middle-class Americans began to view unionism as a threat to their way of life. diminishing power of unions had a negative effect on workers. Boston Police Strike (1919) most controversial strike of 1919 police walked off the job after city officials cut their wages and refused to negotiate with their union. citizens initially felt sympathy for the police, but that vanished as the city lapsed into anarchy. Residents set up citizen patrols to fight rising crime. Governor Calvin Coolidge called in National Guard troops to keep order. "There is no right to strike against the public safety by anybody, anywhere, any time." Coolidge fired the striking policemen and hired new ones. His firm stand made Coolidge a national hero. The next year, the Republican Party nominated him as its candidate for vice president. radicalism: a point of view favoring extreme change, especially in social or economic structure communism: an economic or political system in

which the state or the community owns all property and the means of production, and all citizens share the wealth Palmer Raids: conducted by Justice Department attorney J. Edgar Hoover at the instruction of U.S. Attorney General Mitchell Palmer, a series of unauthorized raids on homes, businesses, and meeting places of suspected subversives that resulted in the arrest of 6,000 radicals, often without any evidence against them Red Scare lasting from 1919 to 1920, a campaign launched by U.S. attorney general Mitchell Palmer and implemented by Justice Department attorney J. Edgar Hoover to arrest communists and other radicals who promoted the overthrow of the U.S. government revived during the Cold War by Senator Joseph McCarthy during a period of anticommunism lasting from 1950 to 1957.

Discrimination The rising tide of immigrants triggered a resurgence of nativism along with calls for immigration restriction nativists feared that the latest immigrants would never become "100 percent American. Congress responded to anti-immigrant pressure by passing the Emergency Immigration Act of 1921 Notice the two big dips in this graph. The first one follows passage of the Emergency Immigration Act of 1921. The second

shows the impact of the Immigration Act of 1924. The first Ku Klux Klan arose during Reconstruction to intimidate freedmen. It faded away after Reconstruction but was reborn in 1915. This new KKK targeted African Americans, immigrants, Jews, Catholics, and anyone with values that Klan members saw as un-American. Klan membership swelled to 3-4 million members and gained considerable political power throughout the country. The KKK portrayed itself as a

defender of American values. American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) The views of nativists and the Klan did not go unchallenged. In 1920, a group of pacifists and social activists founded the to protect freedom of speech. The ACLU specialized in the defense of unpopular individuals and groups Discrimination Asian immigrants also faced severe legal discrimination. The influx of 2.4 million Jewish immigrants from eastern Europe stirred up anti-Semitism (anti-Semitism: policies, views, and actions that discriminate against Jewish people; prejudice against Jews) Anti-Defamation League (ADL) Organization formed to "to stop the defamation [false accusation] of the Jewish people." Its longer-term mission was "to secure justice and fair treatment to all citizens alike."

Catholics were also targets of religious prejudice. Back to Africa? Born in Jamaica, Marcus Garvey traveled widely throughout the Americas. Everywhere he went, he saw discrimination against blacks and the need to restore black pride in people of African heritage. Up, you mighty race, he told his followers. You can accomplish what you will. In 1920, while addressing a crowd of 25,000 in New York City, he outlined a plan to build a new black nation in Africa. Chapter 12, Summary Politics of the Roaring Twenties

1. Americans dislike of foreigners in the 1920s was revealed by the Red Scare, by the rise of the Ku Klux Klan, by a trend towards isolationism and by laws limiting immigration. 2. The labor movement in the 1920s had some successes but mostly went into a period of declining membership, in part because unions were labeled as radicals. 3. Five nations, including the United States, signed an agreement to dismantle parts of their navies. Also, 64 nations signed the Kellogg-Briand Treaty promising to give up war as an instrument of foreign policy. 4. He made poor choices, which brought incidents of bribery and corruption such as the Teapot Dome Scandal and Elk Hills. 5. The business boom was stimulated by a rise in productivity and by the growth of buying on credit. Chapter 13, Summary The Roaring Life of the 1920s 1. Prohibitionthe attempt to make the sale of alcohol illegaland the conflict between fundamentalism and science symbolized in the Scopes trial both reveal the clash between new and traditional values in the 1920s. 2. There were more work opportunities for women in the 1920s than in prior years, but they faced discrimination and unequal treatment. Women were becoming more independent and assertive. In their home lives, women more often were free to choose their own husbands, although the divorce

rate increased. They had fewer children. They enjoyed many conveniences that made housework easier. 3. Through national magazines, radio, and movies, the mass media helped create a national culture. 4. Among the personal achievements of the Harlem Renaissance were the writings of Claude McKay, Langston Hughes, and Zora Neale Hurston; the acting of Paul Robeson; and the music of Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, and Bessie Smith. As your REVIEW your ttt questions, also READ the MAIN IDEAS for each chapter! Chapter 12: Politics of the Roaring Twenties A desire for normality after the war and a fear of COMMUNISM and "foreigners" led to postwar isolationism. The Harding administration appealed to America's desire for calm and peace after the war, but resulted in . SCANDAL Consumer fueled the business boom of the 1920s as GOODS America's standard of living soared.

Whats to come in 2015? "Greatest speech ever made" with HD MUSIC Greatest Speech Ever Made WITHOUT background music "The Great Dictator" (1940) documentary (~25 minutes) What was ROARING in post-World War I America in the 1920s? The return to normalcy ushered in an exciting new era, including the start of the automobile culture, flappers and the revolution in manners and morals. The consumer revolution, the rise of advertising and motion pictures, the Harlem Renaissance, the Jazz Age and the golden age of sports were all glamorous new aspects of American life. Meanwhile, social polarization, prohibition, the Scopes Trial and the rebirth of the KKK represented the more sober social realities. The Roaring 1920s

ratification normalcy women prosperity innovations international automobile international Americans turned away from affairs in the aftermath of World War I, an attitude reflected innormalcy newly elected President Warren G. Hardings call for a return to . The prosperity countrys focus shifted instead to the material benefits associated with Americas innovations unprecedented postwar . Spurred by new inventions and technological

automobile , the United States economy was in the midst of a third industrial revolution. The became a dominant feature of Americas new consumer culture and created a more mobile society, and consumer goods such as electrical appliances caused fundamental the consumer revolution came womenchanges in daily life. Along withratification dramatic cultural changes, especially for . With the of the 19th Amendment, women experienced increased participation in public affairs, improved educational and employment opportunities and enjoyment of the many glamorous aspects of the The Roaring 1920s nativist Harlem Renaissance

flight revival pivotal jazzsports temperance pivotal The motion picture industry was born and quickly assumed a role in jazz American culture. Americans were also entertained by music, just one aspect of the emergence of a distinctively African-American culture, known Harlem Renaissance as the . Heroes from the Golden Age of sports

led by Babe Ruth and Jack Dempsey excited many, and Charles Lindbergh thrilled theflight world with his daring . However, old social tensions flared up during this period of rapid Temperance cultural change. advocates had succeeded in making Prohibition the law of the land, but enforcement proved very difficult. The Ku Klux Klan revival experienced a strong , expressing hatred towards those they regarded nativist as un-American, and groups rejected many elements of the new culture that they believed were destroying American values. The Roaring 1920s gap prosperity

stocks production prosperity The excitement generated by the economic of the time tended to overshadow underlying weaknesses such as high speculation in stocks and the increasing gap production , cutbacks in industrial between rich and poor. The causes for an abrupt end to the

economic optimism of the Roaring Twenties were in place. Nothing in the world can take the place of persistence. Talent will not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent. Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education will not; the world is full of educated derelicts. Persistence and determination are omnipotent. The slogan 'press on' has solved and always will solve the problems of the human race. - Calvin Coolidge Use the documentary video, OTHER internet resources, and your books to fill in the blanks below. assembly line. 1913 Henry Ford sets up the first moving 1913 John Watson publishes Psychology as the Behaviorist Views It. 1914 Marcus Garvey founds the Universal Negro Improvement Association.

1919 The 18th Amendment, prohibiting the sale of alcohol , is ratified. vote with ratification of the 19th Amendment. 1920 Women gain the right to cities than in the countryside 1920s For the first time, more Americans live in 1924 The Immigration Act establishes the first national origins 1925 The Scopes trialis held in Tennessee. 1927 Duke Ellington brings his band to the

Club in Harlem. Cotton 1927 The Jazz Singer, the first talkie , movie is released. 1927 Charles Lindbergh is first to fly solo across the 1929 The stock market quotasystem. Atlantic Ocean. crash signals the end of the Roaring Twenties. Vocabulary Progressivism An American reform movement within both major political parties, from about 1890 to World War I, that

pressed for legislation to reform many aspects of Americas urban and industrial systems. The Jazz Age and The Roaring Twenties Terms used by historians to characterize the decade of the 1920s. Third Industrial Revolution The shift in the 1920s towards relying on electricity for power and utilizing the assembly line for the mass production of consumer goods. Model T A reliable, affordable car that was designed, manufactured and sold by Henry Ford. It became one of the most popular American-made cars in history. mass consumer culture The desire of producers to sell, and of consumers to buy, the many new products developed in the 1920s, such as electrical appliances. 19th Amendment The Constitutional amendment that gave women the right to vote. Speakeasies Places where alcoholic drinks were sold illegally during the time of Prohibition. Flappers Young women of the 1920s who sought to liberate themselves from old social rules and customs and to enjoy life fully and on a basis equal with men. snake oil salesmen A term used to describe dishonest salesmen in traveling medical shows or in country fairs, who sold Vocabulary Universal Negro Improvement Association A large African-American organization founded by Marcus Garvey to promote , and the formation of an independent nation in

pride, economic self . Harlem Renaissance An outpouring of literary and musical creativity by African Americans in the 1920s, centered in City. The Cotton Club A popular nightclub in Harlem where patrons came to enjoy entertainment by African-American performers, including Duke Ellington. A form of melancholy music originated by African Americans in the South. New York Blues Africa racial -sufficiency white

Vocabulary Prohibition A time in American history, following the passage of the 18th Amendment, when it was illegal to produce, transport or consume alcoholic beverages. Ku Klux Klan A secret terror organization dedicated to white supremacy, first organized in the South after the Civil War. nativism A postwar phenomenon characterized by Americans distrust of foreigners and foreign influence. Golden Age of Sports A time in the 1920s when sports became tremendously popular and top athletes like Babe Ruth, Jack Dempsey, Bill Tilden, and Red Grange became sports heroes. Scopes trial A controversial trial in which John Scopes, a high school teacher, was convicted of breaking a Tennessee law outlawing the teaching of evolution. The Gospel of Business During the boom of the 1920s, the strong belief in American corporations and prosperity, best expressed by President Calvin Coolidge, that The chief business of the American people is business. Chapter 12, Summary Politics of the Roaring Twenties 1. Americans dislike of foreigners in the 1920s was revealed by the Red Scare, by the rise of the Ku Klux Klan, by a trend towards isolationism and by laws

limiting immigration. 2. The labor movement in the 1920s had some successes but mostly went into a period of declining membership, in part because unions were labeled as radicals. 3. Five nations, including the United States, signed an agreement to dismantle parts of their navies. Also, 64 nations signed the Kellogg-Briand Treaty promising to give up war as an instrument of foreign policy. 4. He made poor choices, which brought incidents of bribery and corruption such as the Teapot Dome Scandal and Elk Hills. 5. The business boom was stimulated by a rise in productivity and by the growth of buying on credit. Chapter 13, Summary The Roaring Life of the 1920s 1. Prohibitionthe attempt to make the sale of alcohol illegaland the conflict between fundamentalism and science symbolized in the Scopes trial both reveal the clash between new and traditional values in the 1920s. 2. There were more work opportunities for women in the 1920s than in prior years, but they faced discrimination and unequal treatment. Women were becoming more independent and assertive. In their home lives, women more often were free to choose their own husbands, although the divorce rate increased. They had fewer children. They enjoyed many conveniences that made housework easier.

3. Through national magazines, radio, and movies, the mass media helped create a national culture. 4. Among the personal achievements of the Harlem Renaissance were the writings of Claude McKay, Langston Hughes, and Zora Neale Hurston; the acting of Paul Robeson; and the music of Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, and Bessie Smith. Alive! 26 - Understanding Postwar Tensions Rising economic, political, and social tensions marked the years just after World War I. This tense atmosphere affected the murder trial of Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti. Both men were sentenced to death, despite weak evidence. Some Americans saw Sacco and Vanzetti as victims of prejudice against immigrants and radicals. Recession A poorly planned demobilization resulted in an economic recession after World War I. As unemployment rose, living standards for all but the richest Americans declined. Labor unrest Unions staged thousands of strikes for better wages and working conditions. Despite these efforts, unions began to lose strength, and their membership declined. Red Scare Fear of socialists, communists, and anarchists fueled the Red Scare. Attorney General Mitchell Palmer led raids against suspected subversives, often violating their civil liberties. Immigration restriction Congress responded to anti-immigrant pressure by restricting immigration. A quota system also limited the number of immigrants from each country. Back-to-Africa movement African Americans were disappointed that their service to the country in World War I did not reduce racial prejudice. Marcus Garvey's Back-to-Africa

movement appealed to blacks who had given up hope for equality in the United States. Discrimination Nativism surged in the postwar years. A revived Ku Klux Klan targeted blacks, immigrants, Jews, and Catholics as un-American. The Anti-Defamation League began in response to anti-Semitism. The American Civil Liberties Union formed to protect freedom of speech. Alive! 27 - The Politics of Normalcy The election of 1920 launched a decade-long Republican Era in national politics. During that time, three Republican presidentsWarren G. Harding, Calvin Coolidge, and Herbert Hoover worked to return the nation to "normalcy," or peace and prosperity. Isolationism After World War I, many Americans favored a policy of isolationism, or withdrawal from international affairs. Free enterprise system The Republican presidents supported individual enterprise and the free enterprise system by adopting business-friendly fiscal policies. The government cut taxes and spending. Teapot Dome Scandal The Harding administration was marred by corruption. Harding's distress over the Teapot Dome Scandal contributed to his declining health. He died in office in 1923. Washington Naval Conference The Republican presidents turned to diplomacy to prevent another world war. The Washington Naval Conference attempted to reduce military competition by limiting the size of the world's most powerful navies. Kellogg-Briand Pact Sixty-two nations signed this treaty, in which they agreed to outlaw war. Dawes Plan The United States set up the Dawes Plan to help European nations pay their war

debts to American lenders. Dow Jones Industrial Average Americans hoping to "get rich quick" engaged in speculation in land and stocks. The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose as money flowed into the stock market. Economic boom The economy prospered as businesses boomed. Business consolidation led to the domination of most major industries by just a few companies. However, poverty persisted, and many farmers and workers were left out of the boom. Alive! 28 - Popular Culture in the Roaring Twenties New ideas and prosperity brought change to American popular culture in the Roaring

Twenties. The creative energy of writers, artists, filmmakers, and musicians, as well as innovations by businesspeople and inventors, all contributed to new directions in American life. Consumer culture New products and advertising encouraged a buying spree. Credit and installment buying allowed people to buy now and pay later. Mass media National magazines, radio, and motion pictures brought news, information, and entertainment to millions of Americans. Regional differences began to fade as a new national popular culture became part of daily life. Women voters All women gained the vote in 1920. The League of Women Voters encouraged all voters to become informed about public issues. Congress considered, but rejected, the first version of the equal rights amendment. The Jazz Age Jazz, a new form of music, expressed the mood of the decade. Introduced by African American musicians, jazz became popular throughout the country and the world. Harlem Renaissance Musicians and writers centered in Harlem gave voice to the experiences of African Americans in song, poetry, and novels. Lost Generation Disillusioned by World War I and the nation's growing consumer culture, some artists and writers fled to Paris. This "Lost Generation" produced books and poetry that are still read and enjoyed today. Spectator sports More leisure time allowed Americans to attend sporting events. Spectator sports became a big business, and athletes became national celebrities. Alive! 29 - The Clash Between Traditionalism and Modernism

Culturally, the United States became a deeply divided nation during the Roaring Twenties. Tensions arose between traditionalists, with their deep respect for longheld cultural and religious values, and modernists, who embraced new ideas, styles, and social trends. Urban versus rural By 1920, the United States was becoming more urban than rural. Urban areas prospered as business and industry boomed. Rural areas declined economically and in population. Youth versus adults Suspicious of the older generation after the war, many young people rejected traditional values and embraced a new youth culture. Chaperoned courting gave way to unsupervised dating. Flappers scandalized the older generation with their style of dress, drinking, and smoking. Wets versus drys The Eighteenth Amendment launched the social experiment known as prohibition. The Volstead Act, which outlawed the sale of alcohol, was supported by drys and ignored by wets. The Twenty-First Amendment repealed prohibition in 1933. Religion versus science Religious fundamentalists worked to keep the scientific theory of evolution out of public schools. The Scopes trial, testing Tennessee's anti-evolution law, was a legal victory for fundamentalists but a defeat in the court of public opinion. The issue of teaching creationism in biology classes is still current today.

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