Hatchet by Gary Paulsen

Hatchet by Gary Paulsen

Hatchet by Gary Paulsen A Story of Perseverance and Determination Created and Compiled by Sally C. Shoemaker Learning Target: I can gather background information that helps me understand the setting and theme of the novel. What ten (10) items would I include in a survival kit? Write this question in your journal. Make a list of items that you think are important for survival. Be sure to include an explanation for each item.

Setting: The Canadian Shield This plateau region of eastern and northern Canada and the Great Lakes area of North America mainly includes rough and rocky surfaces, and large areas of coniferous (evergreen) forests. In addition, the northern regions along the Arctic Circle are comprised of rocky frozen tundra. The highest elevation is estimated at 1,640 ft.

The Author: Gary Paulsen Born May 17, 1939, Gary Paulsen is one of America's most popular writers for young people. Although he was never a dedicated student, Paulsen developed a passion for reading at an early age. After a librarian gave him a book to read along with his own library card he was hooked. He began spending hours alone in the basement of his apartment building, reading one book after another.

The Author: Gary Paulsen - continued It is Paulsen's overwhelming belief in young people that drives him to write. His intense desire to tap deeply into the human spirit and to encourage readers to observe and care about the world around them has brought him both enormous popularity with young people and critical acclaim from the children's book community. Paulsen is a master storyteller who has written more than 175 books and some 200 articles and short stories for children and adults. He is one of the most important writers of young adult literature today and three of his novels Hatchet, Dogsong, and The Winter Room were Newbery Honor Books. His books frequently appear on the best books lists of the American Library

Association. Issues This novel discusses many issues that you may or may not deal with in your own lives. Survival Divorce Anger Hunger Pain Frustration Wanting to Give Up

Thankfulness Learning Target: I can gather information about survival in the wilderness. What survival skills do you have? Write this question in your journal. Answer this this question explaining what you know how to do. The Alaska Experiment: Part 1-Into the Wilds While we view this video, record problems that you identify in the video. Look for problems that you see arise, possible

solutions and make predictions about possible problems. Problems Solutions Predictions When you are discouraged, what motivates you to keep trying? Think of a time when you really considered giving up, but didnt. What made you keep going when you were tempted to quit? Write this response in your journal.

Make sure to 1. explain the situation, 2. tell how you felt, 3. and what you did to keep going. Vocabulary List #1 1. horizon 1audi - hear 2. wince(ing) 1 amphi - both 3. audible 1 4. turbulence 2 5. mock(ing) 2 6. hummocks 4

7. amphibious 5 8. diminish 6 9. ruefully 6 10.staff - 8 Vocabulary List #1 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

horizon 1 audible 1 amphibious - 5 diminish - 6 staff - 8 audi hear amphi - both Learning Target: I can identify the elements of foreshadowing in my reading.

What is foreshadowing? Write this question in your journal. Write a definition for this term in your journal. Be sure to include an example. What is foreshadowing? Foreshadowing is a literary device in which a writer gives an advance hint of what is to come later in the story. Foreshadowing often appears at the beginning of a story or a chapter and makes the reader develop expectations about the coming events in a story. There are varieties of ways of foreshadowing.

A writer may use dialogues of characters to hint at what may occur in future. Any event or action in the story may throw a hint at the readers about future events or action. Even a title of a work or a chapter title can act as a clue that suggests what is going to happen. Foreshadowing in fiction creates an atmosphere of suspense in a story so that the readers are always interested to know more. Reading Selections Evidence of Foreshadowing

Unfamiliar Words & Phrases Contrasts and Contradictions Figurative Language/ Sensory Details Chapters 1 and 2 Four Square Notes

Foreshadowing: Guided Questions In your journal, respond to each of these questions: 1. How does foreshadowing and imagery help the reader better understand the events of a story? 2. How do you predict these events will become important in later chapters? Learning Target: I can identify specific language devices that an author uses in

his/her writing. Memorable Devices Think of a significant person in your life such as a parent, grandparent, or mentor. What is the one thing that you remember this person saying or communicating to you? Write this statement in your journal and explain why it is important to you. Language Devices Personification

Simile Metaphor Repetition Imagery Oxymoron Reading Selections: Chapters 3 and 4 Flow Map Use a flow map in your journal to chart the sequence of events in the two chapters we are reading today.

The Power of Positive Thinking What power does Brian find in positive thinking? Answer this question in your journal. Make sure to include evidence from the text. Learning Target: I can use elements of characterization to describe the main character. Character Description:

Write a description of Brian in your Journal. Make sure to include information about his physical description as well as his thoughts, words, actions, and feelings. Reading Selections: Chapters 5 & 6 Make sure to watch out for vocabulary words. Record words and definitions in your journal. Obstacles: Complete this written response in your journal.

Brian faces different types of obstacles or problems. Name one (1) obstacles that he has faced and explain what advice you would give him to deal with or overcome that problem. Learning Target: I can explain how hope can create change in a character. Hope: What are you hoping for in 2019? Write this question and a complete response in

your journal. Reading Selections: Chapters 7 & 8 Draw a Multi Flow Map in your Journal. Illustrate how Brians feelings about his situation have changed and the reasons that brought these changes. Learning Target: I can use my knowledge to answer comprehension questions.

Reading Quiz #1 This quiz will cover chapters 1 through 8. You may use your book and your journal as you take this test. Take out one sheet of paper to use as your answer sheet. DO NOT WRITE ON THE TEST. BONUS! - Write a one (1) paragraph summary of Chapters 1-8. This is worth 10 points! May the Force be with you! Vocabulary List #2 1. smoldered - 9 2. flue - 9

3. eddy (ied) - 10 4. dormant - 10 5. comprised 11 6. persistent 12 7. claimed 13 8. infuriating 13 9. influence 14 10.confines - 14 dorm - sleep com - together in - in

con - together per - through flu - flow Vocabulary List #2 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. smoldered 9

dormant - 10 persistent 12 infuriating - 13 influence - 14 dorm - sleep per - through in - in Learning Target: I can identify the conflicts our character is dealing with in this

novel. Conflict: What conflicts is Brian dealing with in the wilderness? Write this question and your response in your journal. Remember, there are four different kinds of conflict. Character Character Character Character

Against Against Against Against Character Self Nature Society Reading Selections: Chapters 9 & 10

Clip from Castaway Chuck discovers fire. Compare and Contrast: Draw a Double Bubble Map in your journal. Complete a comparison of Chuck from Castaway and Brian from Hatchet. Learning Target: I can identify the cause and the result of conflict.

Coming of Age How will you know that you are not a child anymore? Write this question and a complete response in your journal. Reading Selections: Chapters 11 & 12 A Boy Called Slow In this book, Sitting Bull performs a deed so courageous and significant that it earns him a new and more respected name.

Leaving Childhood Behind: What event or act will prove you worthy of leaving childhood behind? What will give you new respect for yourself as you become an adolescent? Write these questions and your responses in your journal. Learning Target: I can identify textual evidence to support ideas in writing.

There were these things to do. In describing Brians activities in the wilderness, Gary Paulsen repeatedly uses this phrase. Why does he use this phrase and how does it reflect Brians frame of mind? Write these questions and your responses in your journal. Reading Selections: Chapters 13 & 14 Today, as you review what you have read, create a list of textual evidence that shows how much Brian has changed. Make sure to

collect quotes, descriptions, and page numbers. Page # Event Description Quote Learning Target: I can use textual evidence to support my ideas in writing.

Informal Essay: In the story Hatchet, Brian comes to terms with his situation and is realizing that he must get motivated to make the best of his situation. Motivation is what will help Brian survive. He remembers the advice of a teacher who always told him that motivation was very important. Everyone needs motivation to help them in difficult times. Think about the positive things in your life that motivate you. Could negative experiences motivate you as well? Convey an experience when you had to motivate yourself to do something you did not think you could do. Vocabulary List #3

1. stabilize 15 2. incessant 17 3. propel 18 4. fuselage 18 5. numb 19 6. sheath 19 7. coil(s) 19 8. precise 19 9. drone 19 10.furor - Epilogue in in or not

sta - stop pro - forward pre - before Vocabulary List #3 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. stabilize 15 sta - stop

propel 18 pro - forward numb 19 drone 19 furor Epilogue Learning Target: I can identify flashbacks in the novel. How does Gary Paulsen incorporate the past into the present?

Write this question in your journal. Define flashback. Give three different examples from the book. Flashback a literary device in the narrative of a motion picture, novel, etc., by which an event or scene taking place before the present time in the narrative is inserted into the chronological structure of the work. a flashback is used to explain a current happening or to fill in the gaps of missing information.

Reading Selections: Chapters 15 & 16 While thinking about what you have read, put an eye on the future and make predictions. Create a prediction chart. Page # Event Prediction Reading Quiz #2

This quiz will cover chapters 9 through 16. You may use your book and your journal as you take this test. Take out one sheet of paper to use as your answer sheet. DO NOT WRITE ON THE TEST. BONUS: Write a paragraph explaining how Brian has changed since the beginning of the story. Make sure to use evidence from the text. 10 Points DO NOT LEAVE THIS GIFT UNWRAPPED! May the Force be with you! Learning Target: I can identify elements of style the author uses in our novel.

A Question of Style How would you describe Paulsens writing style? Write this question in your journal. Give a complete explanation and examples from the text. Reading Selections Chapters 17 & 18 Look for elements of style in what you have read. Page # Quote

I like the way the author What is your style? How would you describe your style of writing. Give examples to show what kind of writer you are. Learning Target: I can define irony and explain how it is used in the text.

What is irony? Write this question in your journal. Write a definition in your own words. The use of words or events to convey a meaning that is the opposite of its literal or expected meaning: the irony of her reply, How nice! when I said I had to work all weekend. Three Types of Irony Verbal What is said is different that what is meant.

Situational Something happens that we wouldnt expect to happen. Dramatic The reader knows something that the characters do not. Irony Graphic Organizer Look back at your reading from Hatchet. Work with your Reading Partner to locate examples of all three types of irony in our story. Record these on your chart. Make this a competition and see who can locate the most examples.

Quizizz To review, we will complete a Quizizz game. Go to Quizizz.com. Enter the code I give you. You will need to put in your first name and last initial. Complete the quiz! Learning Target: I can identify the point the author is making through his use of irony.

The Survival Pack What would you want to find in the survival pack? Write this question in your journal. Make a list of items you would like to find in the survival pack. Be prepared to explain the reason or purpose for each item. Reading Selections: Chapter 19 and the Epilogue Open Book Test MONDAY! Think about Brians reaction to the Survival Pack. How

would your reaction be different? Vocabulary List #4 1. matted 693 exo - out 2. glum 694 bene - good 3. sought 694 ad - to 4. plight 694 5. nurtured 695 6. fend 697 7. exorbitant 3 8. benevolent 7 9. adjoining 56

10.loomed - 61 All words are found in our Literature book. Vocabulary List #4 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. matted 693 nurtured - 695

fend - 697 benevolent 7 adjoining 56 bene - good ad - to All words are found in our Literature book. Learning Target: I can demonstrate my understanding of the text.

Vocabulary Test #1 This test will cover lists 1-3. You may write on this test. When complete, turn it in to the basket and begin the Hatchet Test. Hatchet Test This quiz will cover the entire book. You may use your book and your journal as you take this test. Take out one sheet of paper to use as your

answer sheet. DO NOT WRITE ON THE TEST. Complete the BONUS! 10 Points May the Force be with you! BONUS QUESTIONS! Brians Reaction: Respond to the following 1. How do you feel about Brians reaction to the contents of the survival pack? 2. If you could replace one item in the pack with another

item, what would you want to eliminate and what would you like to add to the pack? Learning Target: I can compare elements of narration. Under the Influence Write about a person who has made a positive difference in your life. What kind of person is he or she?

How did this person influence your life? Reading Selections: Going Blind by Ray Charles & David Ritz pages 693698 from Ray Charles by Sharon Bell Mathis 699-702 Point of View

How would each selection be different if it were written from a different persons point of view or if the point of view of the two selections were switched? Answer this question in your journal. Learning Target:

I can compare points of view to determine reader responses. Point of View NOTES! These are critical for you to understand the viewpoint of the author and it also helps you analyze action, emotion, and purpose. Selection Test: Going Blind and from Ray Charles

You may write on this test. Read each question carefully and give a complete answer. You may use your journal and the selections from the Literature book. Learning Target: I can identify character traits.

A Hero Make a list of real people and fictional characters that you consider to be heroic. What qualities or actions make each one Quality heroic? Hero Reading Selections: The Fly by Mai-Vo Dinh pages 3-7

The King of Mazy May by Jack London 54-65 To Live Jack London once declared, The proper function of man is to live, not exist. Explain how the characters in our stories carry out this

idea. Be sure to include characters from both selections. Learning Target: I can compare stories from different genres. A Cry in the Wild Movie Comparison Worksheet Learning Target:

I can create questions for an interview on a particular topic. Interview Questions: If you could interview Brian, what five (5) questions would you ask him?

Record a list of these questions in your journal. Learning Target: I can use textual evidence in an essay. Character Change - Informative/Explanatory Essay After reading Hatchet, write a multi-paragraph essay that answers all of the following questions: What events in the story led to Brian going from a dependent city boy who knew very little about how to take care of himself, to a self-reliant, strong young man who knew how to survive alone in the wilderness?

What character traits did Brian acquire while surviving for 54 days? Use evidence from the story that shows how Brian changed. Provide support for your ideas by paraphrasing sentences from the book that support your understanding. Learning Target: I can use textual evidence to support my ideas. Writing Assessment: Character Change Writing Tasks: Prewriting

Drafting Tree Map Writing Plan Brians Change Introduction City Boy Survival Skills Changes

Specific Evidence Conclusion Learning Target: I can use textual evidence to support my ideas in my essay. Writing Assessment: Character Change

Writing Tasks: Complete Drafting Begin Revising & Editing YOUVE BEEN TAGGED! Today we are going to work with in groups to identify areas where we need to revise. Meet with your group.

Read the assigned portion of your essay OUT LOUD. Write down the suggestions that your peers give you. Pink Introductions Orange Evidence Green Conclusions Learning Target: I can use textual evidence to support my ideas in my essay. Writing Assessment: Character Change

Writing Tasks: Partner Review Ask them to check the changes you already made. Clean Drafts Editing Learning Target: I can use textual evidence to support my ideas in my essay. Writing Assessment: Character Change

Writing Tasks: Final Partner Review Final Drafts Proofreading Vocabulary List #5 1. hoe 805 mel - song 2. mellow - 805 per - through 3. plod - 805 4. keen - 195

5. coarse - 307 6. lithe - 307 7. brooch - 136 8. fanfare - 138 9. perpetual - 138 10.handle - 402 All words are found in our Literature book. Vocabulary List #5 1. 2. 3.

4. 5. mellow - 805 mel - song plod - 805 per - through coarse - 307 fanfare - 138 perpetual - 138 All words are found in our Literature book. Learning Target:

I can use sound devices to analyze a piece of literature. Making Connections How do you communicate with friends or family members? Write this question in your journal. Think about some of the ways you share your thoughts and feelings

with others. Make a list of all the ways you can communicate with your friends and family members. Do all of these involve words? Sound Devices There are two sound devices that we see frequently in poems. Alliteration

the repetition of consonant sounds, usually at the beginning of words. Assonance the repetition of vowel sounds, especially in a line of poetry. Sound Devices Both alliteration and assonance affect the sound of a poem and help convey its tone. They can draw attention to certain words or lines, making the poems meaning clearer. Alliteration and assonance can also make a poem sound more musical.

Reading Selections A Time to Talk by Robert Frost p. 805 Silence by Paul Laurence Dunbar p. 806 Written Response: Self-Write Stanza Write one stanza of a poem of your own about friendship or something that you have learned about life. Use alliteration and assonance to give your stanza a musical quality. Learning Target:

I can use imagery to analyze a piece of literature. Creating Images In your mind, picture a full moon. Write for a few minutes about the image in your mind.

How does the moon look? What familiar objects does it look like? What does it make you think about or feel? Imagery Imagery is the language that appeals to the senses.

It describes how something looks, sounds, feels, smells, or tastes. Paying attention to imagery helps you visualize setting and characters in a text. If you try to imagine what is described as you read, you are more likely to understand the text. Reading Selection who knows if the moons by E. E. Cummings p. 195

As you read the poem, try to picture what the imagery suggests. Written Response: Object Imagery Think of an object that you find interesting or mysterious.

Make a list of words or phrases that you could use to describe the object. Try to include words that appeal to the five senses sight, sound, touch, smell, and taste. Then use your imagery in a short poem about the object. Learning Target: I can use figurative language to analyze a piece of literature. Using Figurative Language

Think about something in nature that reminds you of something about yourself. In your journal, write a paragraph about something in nature that reflects who you are. Explain how it represents you. Figurative Language

Poets often use figurative language to express ideas beyond the literal meanings of words. Figurative language includes figures of speech, or expressions in which words are used in a different way than usual, to add beauty or force. A metaphor is a figure of speech that implies a caparison between two unlike things. Ex. My love is a rose.

A simile uses like or as to compare seemingly unlike things. Ex. - My love is like a rose. It is important to pay attention to metaphors and similes because they often express a poets key ideas. Reading Selections What I can do I will and Fame is a bee by Emily Dickenson p. 358

As you read, ask yourself, what is being compared in each poem? Written Response: My Dream If you could share one idea in a poem about pursuing your dreams, what would it be? Write a stanza of poetry that includes a metaphor or simile to

express a key idea. If you create a simile, remember to use like or as. Learning Target: I can use symbolism to analyze a piece of literature. Understanding Symbolism

Think about where you like to go when you are alone. Make a list in your journal of the places you have in mind. Then add a few words that describe or tell why youve chosen each place. Symbolism A symbol is something concrete, such as an object, a person, a

place, or an experience, that stands for more than just itself. Symbols usually represent something abstract, such as an idea or a thought. For example, a flag often stands for freedom, and a heart can stand for love. Identifying symbols can help you unlock the meaning of a poem and understand ideas or concepts the poet wants to emphasize. Reading Selections

My Parents by Stephen Spender p. 307 Maestro by Pat Mora p. 312 Mad by Naomi Shihab Nye p. 332 As you read, ask yourself, which words or phrases are symbols for something else? Written Response: The Blurbs

How would you tell someone else about one of these poems? Write a blurb a short, informal description about the poem that you could post on a poetry web site. Briefly explain what the poem is about and your opinion of it. Be sure to include your purpose for writing and an appropriate closing, including your name. Learning Target:

I can use tone to analyze a piece of literature. Attitude Adjustment Think about your grandparents or other older people you respect and admire. What are they like? How are you like them? In your journal, describe how the person looks and acts, or tell a

story about the person. Tone Tone is an authors attitude toward a subject. For example, the tone might be humorous, serious, or sympathetic. An author reveals tone through words and images he or she uses

to describe a setting, depict a character, or narrate an event. Figurative language, such as metaphors and similes, idioms, or elements in poetry, such as line length, punctuation, rhythm, repetition, and rhyme, may reveal the tone and support the theme. Identifying the tone helps you know how the author feels about the reader, the subject, or a character. Reading Selections

Yes, It Was My Grandmother by Luci Tapahonso p. 402 Good Luck Gold by Janet Wong p. 403 As you read each poem, ask yourself, which words, images, or other elements reveal the authors attitude toward her subject? Written Response: Scene Conversion

Identify the main events in one of the poems. Rewrite one event as a scene in a story. Keep the same characters and actions that are in the poem. You may want to make the speaker one of the characters. Identify the tone of the poem, and then use words and images to convey the same tone in your scene. Learning Target:

I can use theme to analyze a text. Analyzing Theme Do you have a hero? Think of someone that you admire. Write this persons name in your journal. Now, write a description of this person that shows why you admire

them. Theme The theme is the lesson about life that the author of the story or poem wants to share with the readers. It is not the same as the subject. For example, to decide which two routes to take to the library on a

bicycle, you compare and contrast them: Both are a mile long, but one is paved and the other is rough. Understanding through Comparing and Contrasting You can deepen your understanding of literature if you compare and contrast literary elements, such as theme.

To compare and contrast the themes of The Courage That My Mother Had by Edna St. Vincent Millay (136) and My Father is a Simple Man by Luis Omar Salinas (137-138), use a chart like the one on the next slide. Below each title, fill in details like subject, theme, tone, speaker, etc. Look back at all the elements we have discussed over the last two weeks. Understanding through Comparing and Contrasting Title Subject

Theme Tone Speaker The Courage That My Mother Had My Father Is a Simple Man Learning Target: I can use textual evidence to analyze literary text.

Analysis Assessment Take out a sheet of paper. Turn to pages 436 - 438. Complete this assessment answering questions 1-12.

Read each question carefully and think about what we have learned about analyzing poems. When complete, turn this in to the basket. Vocabulary Test #2 This test will cover lists 4-5. You may write on this test. When complete, turn it in to the basket.

Learning Target: I can use textual evidence to compare two poems. Writing Assessment: Think about what you have learned about comparing and contrasting.

Look back to your journals to identify elements of literature. Look at the chart you completed earlier this week. Use all of this information to respond to this prompt. Writing Practice: Writing to Compare In this essay, you will compare and contrast these two poems. You will find the chart you completed to be helpful. Focus on the authors desires and on their ability to possess the admired personal

qualities of their parents. Here are some ideas to help you begin: State the personal qualities the speaker in each poem admires. Tell whether each speaker desires to possess the parents admired quality. Tell whether each speaker feels he or she will be able to possess the parents admired quality. Explain information in the poems that illustrate the elements we have discussed: assonance, alliteration, imagery, figurative language, symbolism, and tone.

Include lines from the poems that support your statements. This is your textual evidence! Writing Tasks Review the Prompt Make sure your chart is completed.

Complete the following Tasks: Prewriting Drafting Learning Target: I can use writing to teach. Writing to Teach

What are the important elements of informational Writing? Write this question in your journal. Make a list of elements, components, or parts that must be included in this type of writing. Focus on Structure 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Go back to your writing plan. Do your points flow one to another? Does your structure make sense? Ask a partner to read your draft. Listen to their feedback about your structure. 6. Make changes. Learning Target: I can add elaboration to my writing.

What does a pothole do? Write this question in your journal. Write the effects of hitting a pothole. Adding Details to Your Writing Today we are going to work with partners to find questions that are unanswered.

Tape each page of your draft to another piece of paper side by side. Trade your essay with a partner. Partners: As you read the essay, write questions you want to know about on the side page that are not answered in the essay. Now look for answers to the questions and add this to your essay. Learning Target:

I can revise and edit my writing. What is the difference between revising and editing? Write this question in your journal. Write the answer explaining the difference between these two steps in the writing process.. Focus on Editing

Focus on Revising How do I do this? How do I do this?

By making decisions about how to engage the reader By making certain you have added any missing information By making decisions about the comparison categories you use By following a checklist you create from the prompt By checking your structure

By making sure that punctuation is used properly (especially in quotations) By making sure that paragraphs are divided accurately By making sure that spelling is accurate

By making sure that capital letters are used correctly By making sure that your sentences vary in structure and length Creating a Clean Draft Focus on cleaning up. Today you will take all your notes, ideas, and questions and write a new, clean draft. This will give you a clean slate to edit. Learning Target:

I can transform my rough draft into a final draft. What rules do we follow for a final draft? Write and answer this question in your journal. Final Draft Procedures Write your heading in the upper, right hand corner of the first page. Use Blue or Black Ball Point Ink ONLY! Write on only one side of the paper. Number all your pages.

Write your name and page number in the upper, right hand corner of each page after page 1. Give your story a title. Write it in the top line of the first page. Do Not Skip Lines! Reflection Think about this unit we have been working on. What have you learned about informational writing? What did you accomplish that you did not think you could do? Answer these questions in your journal. Complete your Journal TOC! CELEBRATE! We are almost at the end!

Learning Target: I can use all I have learned to write an essay comparing two texts.

In all the texts that you have read thus far, the characters have demonstrated the necessary traits needed to persevere and to overcome lifes obstacles. Analyze the poems If by Rudyard Kipling, and Mother to Son by Langston Hughes. Discuss what theme both of these authors present in their texts. Cite evidence from both texts. The 100 Minute Writing Plan

Part 1: Planning/Prewriting (15 minutes) Part 2: Draft (35 minutes) Part 3: Revise (20 minutes) Part 4: Prepare Final Draft (20 minutes) Part 5: Proofread (10 minutes) Learning Target: I can use information from a text to answer comprehension questions.

Turn to page 54 in your Literature Book. Today we are taking the Selection test for The King of Mazy May by Jack London. You may write on this test and you may use the selection as well as your unit journal. Tests are to be turned in to the basket when complete.

May the Force be with You! Learning Target: I can write a personal reflection of my performance in Unit 3. Reflective Writing Complete the Unit Reflection Guide Use a quote on positive thinking that you select from any source as the beginning of your reflective essay. Make sure to connect it to what your essay is about. Write an essay that communicates what you have learned in this

unit and how you will use it in your own life. Unit Reflection Writing Tasks: Revise and Edit your Reflective Essay Look Back at the Reflection Guide to make sure you included everything. Follow the procedures to complete your final draft. These completed essays are due by the end of the class period on Thursday.

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