Levels of responsibility for health promotion

Levels of responsibility for health promotion

Health Promotion Based on the Five Action Areas of the Ottawa Charter Levels of responsibility for health promotion The benefits of partnerships in health promotion, eg government sector, nongovernment agencies and the local community How health promotion based on the Ottawa Charter promotes social justice The Ottawa Charter in action Health Promotion Based on the Five Action Areas of the Ottawa Charter Five action areas of the Ottawa Charter Building Healthy Public Policy Creating Supportive Environments Strengthening Community Action Developing Personal Skills Reorientating Health Services Health promotion based on the five action areas are vital to the success of health promotion in Australia. It promotes social

justice and improves the health outcomes of Australians It ensures health promotion is done in partnership as the relevant sectors support each other in achieving better health outcomes It recognises the various determinants of health and the spread of responsibility between individuals, communities and governments Australias health promotion based on the five action areas of the Ottawa Charter is currently achieving results for many health promotion initiatives including: Close the Gap National Chronic Disease Strategy Road Safety National Binge Drinking Strategy Aged Care Access Initiative

Levels of Responsibility for Health Promotion Australian governments, communities and individuals all play a role in responsibility for health promotion. Health promotion should involve all levels of responsibility to achieve the best health results Individuals play an important role in developing personal skills in relation to health Communities are central in strengthening community action and creating supportive environments The government is vital in building healthy public policy, creating supportive environments and reorienting health services Investigate the responsibilities of individuals, communities and governments under the action areas of the Ottawa Charter Governments Building Healthy Public Policy All levels of government are responsible for the creation and maintenance of policies that aim to improve health. E.g.) the close the gap statement of intent Communities Individuals Contribute towards the development of health policies

and are involved in caring the policies out. E.g.) ATSI community involvement in the development and implementation of close the gap Act in accord with the policies delivered. E.g.) not smoking in public areas Levels of Responsibility for Health Promotion Creating Supportive Environments Strengthening Community Action Governments Communities Responsible for the planning, implementation and management of infrastructure. E.g.) location of hospitals, parks, community centres.

Council approve developments, remove waste etc Help maintain healthy environments and promote healthy behaviours. E.g.) clean up Australia day, fun runs, maintain parks, fields and ovals, YMCA gyms etc Governments Communities Engage with community groups in the creation of policies. E.g.) allowing communities to provide feedback on policies before signing them Contribute to and take ownership of policies being empowered to act and implement them. E.g.) Aboriginal community

controlled health services Individuals Make better health choices using and maintaining the environment. E.g.) putting rubbish in the bins provided. Individuals Promote community activities that promote health, be involved in community actions. E.g.) promote fun runs, engage in community discussions around health Levels of Responsibility for Health Promotion Governments Developing Personal Skills Develop policies and provide funding towards developing personal skills. E.g.) K-10 PDHPE compulsory, advertisements (2 & 5) etc

Governments Reorientation of Health Services Fund, research and create policies around prevention and health promotion. Looking at all the determinants of health and not just curative services. E.g.) TV advertisements, training of primary health sector to promote health as well as cure. Communities Individuals Run education and training programs to develop personal skills in relation to health. E.g.) community health centre education (pre-natal classes, brochures etc) school education system, Quit helpline etc

Seek to develop their own skills in relation to health. Enabled to take charge of their own health E.g.) research behavioural choices for health, act on advice from GPs and health practitioners, enrol in community programs etc Communities Individuals Conduct research, and be involved in the promotion of health. E.g.) cancer council conducts research around cancer, but also promotes better health choices in relation to the prevention of cancer. Seek to make healthy life choices, and help others to do the same, including participation in health

promotion. E.g.) participating in jump-rope-for-heart or getting advice from a GP on quitting smoking The Benefits of Partnerships in Health Promotion Argue the benefits of health promotion based on: Individuals, communities and governments working in partnership Partnerships are between many groups including both the government sector and non-government agencies, along with local communities and the individual. Health promotion demands coordinated action by all concerned: Governments Health and other social and economic sectors Non-governmental and voluntary organisations Local authorities Industry Media All people are involved as individuals, families and communities. Professional, social groups and

health personnel have a responsibility to mediate between different interests in society for the pursuit of health The Benefits of Partnerships in Health Promotion Individuals and communities should be involved in the development of health promotion programs ensures their needs are met and empowers them to act in accordance with the promotion Individuals and communities should be involved in the creation, implementation and analysis Individuals and communities can be involved in activities such as: Data analysis Community meetings Consultations Surveys The government sector and non-government agencies should work together with individual and communities. Not only do individuals and communities help identify health issues but they need to improve their capacity to improve their health The sharing of information is vital. Government and non-government agencies need to share research findings, funds, and connections should be shared so more people benefit.. This helps ensure more efficient health promotion as research is not doubled up and funding can be dispersed across multiple action areas. Partnership in health promotion enables health to be promoted through: advocacy, legislation, policy change, programs, community projects, consultative community meetings, surveys and the analysis of local health data.

The Benefits of Partnerships In Health Promotion The benefits of partnerships in health promotion include: Addresses needs of individuals and communities More comprehensive health promotion Better results in health promotion goals Empowers individuals to act More efficient health promotion (no doubling up and reduced wasted time/money) How Health Promotion Based on The Ottawa Charter Promotes Social Justice Health promotion aims to reduce inequities in health status, ensuring equal opportunities and resources for health. This enables people to achieve the best health possible as they have a supportive environment, access to information, life skills and opportunities for making healthy choices How Health Promotion Based on The Ottawa Charter Promotes Social Justice Investigate the principles of social justice under the action areas of the Ottawa Charter

Building Health Public Policy Equity Diversity Supportive Environments Public policy is designed with the aim of producing equity in health status. Eg) Medicare provides access to health services for socioeconomically disadvantaged people Public policy accounts for the diversity of our population, seeking to provide for all people groups. Eg) The close the gap initiative aims to remove the health inequity for ATSI people in 1

generation. Policy should aim to produce an environment that supports healthy choices. Eg) no smoking in pubs and clubs How Health Promotion Based on The Ottawa Charter Promotes Social Justice Creating Supportive Environments Equity Diversity Supportive Environments An environment is not supportive if it does not seek to provide equity. Eg) increasing access to health facilities for rural and remote people.

In order to be supportive, the environment must also cater for the diversity of the people in that environment. Eg) providing translators for specific groups in specific community health centres/ hospitals etc Creating environments that encourage healthy choices is vital in health promotion. Eg) ensuring good parks for outdoor activities How Health Promotion Based on The Ottawa Charter Promotes Social Justice Strengthening Community Action Equity Diversity

Supportive Environments Equity both with and between communities is important in health promotion. Communities of people suffering inequity in health need to be utilised and empowered in order to improve their health. Eg) ATSI involved in the development and implementation of health promotion for ATSI. Each community has its own diversity and needs to be consulted in health promotion. Eg) large Jewish population in Bondi, Lebanese in Bankstown etc should be empowered in relation to health promotion initiative specific for them.

Communities that become empowered need an environment that supports their healthy choices. This requires access and availability of services and facilities. Eg) bushwalks being maintained in the blue mountains to encourage locals to walk How Health Promotion Based on The Ottawa Charter Promotes Social Justice Developing Personal Skills Equity Diversity Supportive Environments All people should have access to education and skill development

regardless of socioeconomic, sociocultural and environmental determinants. Eg) PDHPE Programs should be personalised to cater for the diversity in our population (ethnic, socioeconomic, geographic etc). Eg) health pamphlets in multiple languages utilising images People share their skills and knowledge within their environment making it more supportive.Eg) parents educate and model for their children, who do the same in their peer groups How Health Promotion Based on The Ottawa Charter Promotes Social Justice

Re-orienting Health Services Equity Diversity Supportive Environments Health services must address the inequities in health. Eg) mental health promotion and services in rural and remote locations Health services must meet the diverse needs of the communities they are in. Eg) promoting balanced diet amongst ATSI people Health services must help provide a supportive environment. Eg) Multi Purpose Service Program for rural and remote

people This is how health promotion based on the Ottawa Charter promotes social justice principles. The Ottawa Charter In Action The Ottawa Charter was developed in 1986 at the First International Conference on Health Promotion. The Charter recognised the many determinants of health and developed five (5) action areas to be used in health promotion to address these determinants. The five action areas are: The Ottawa Charter In Action Build Healthy Public Policy policy development at all levels seeks to promote health. It includes: legislation, fiscal measures, taxation, and organisational change. Health, income and social policies are used to foster equity and ensures safer and healthier goods and services, healthier public services, and cleaner more enjoyable environments. Policies need to identify obstacles to health and seek to remove them, making the healthier choice the easiest one. Create Supportive Environments there is a link between peoples health and their environment, requiring a socioecological approach to health. Reciprocal maintenance of environments is the guiding principle. Work and leisure should promote health, not demote it. Thus health promotion should create safe working environments that are enjoyable, assess health impacts of developing infrastructure (buildings, energy etc), and protect natural and built environments. Strengthen Community Actions community action is strengthened through communities being involved in setting priorities, making decisions, planning strategies and implementing them to improve health outcomes. The process goal is to empower communities, which improves outcomes of health promotion.

The Ottawa Charter In Action Develop Personal Skills requires the provision of information, education and life skill development. This increases options and control for individuals over their own health. It is essential to equip people for life long learning and to develop skills for coping with ill health. This is done through school, home, and community settings. Reorient Health Services health promotion is the responsibility of governments, institutions, professionals, community groups and individuals. Reorienting health services is about the shift towards a system which promotes health, rather than curative services. Health services need to support the needs of individuals and communities to promote health, connecting the health sector with social, political, economic and physical environments. This requires greater health research and professional education and training. The shift is to focus on the needs of the entire individual, not just their injury, illness or disease. Argue the benefits of health promotion based on: The five action areas of the Ottawa Charter Australia bases its health promotion on these five (5) action areas. The benefits of such an approach include: Better results of health promotion Health promotion that addresses all the determinants of health Greater empowerment of individuals and groups Health promotion that is based on the principles of social justice The Ottawa Charter in Action Beyond Blue National Tobacco Strategy

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