Module 8 of the National School Mental Health Curriculum - Impact

Module 8 of the National School Mental Health Curriculum - Impact

Module 8: Impact National School Mental Health Curriculum 1 Disclaimer The opinions expressed herein are the views of the Mental Health Technology Transfer Center Network and the National Center for School Mental Health and do not reflect the official position of the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), SAMHSA. No official support or endorsement of DHHS, SAMHSA, for the opinions described in this document is intended or should be inferred. National School Mental Health Curriculum 2 Disclaimer Public Domain Notice All material appearing in this publication except that taken directly from copyrighted sources is in the

public domain and may not be reproduced or copied without permission from SAMHSA. Do not reproduce or distribute this publication for a fee without specific, written authorization from the MHTTC NCO. All material appearing in this publication should be appropriately cited using the recommended citation below. If content is removed, added, or adapted from the original material in this publication, these modifications should be clearly noted. Recommended Citation National Center for School Mental Health and MHTTC Network Coordinating Office. (2019). Trainer manual, National School Mental Health Curriculum. Palo Alto, CA: MHTTC Network Coordinating Office. National School Mental Health Curriculum 3 Agenda Definition Value Quality Indicators and Best Practices Strategic Planning

National School Mental Health Curriculum 4 What Do We Mean by Impact? Long-term effects or changes that occur as a result of the programs, practices, or policies implemented within a comprehensive school mental health system. National School Mental Health Curriculum 5 Why Document and Report Impact? Describe your successes and challenges.

Use the information to inform continuous quality improvement. Advocate for system maintenance, growth, and change. National School Mental Health Curriculum 6 Quality Indicators Quality Indicators: Impact # of students who: Were eligible to receive Tier 2 or Tier 3 school mental health services Received at least one Tier 2 or Tier 3 service Impact

Demonstrated documented improvement in educational functioning Demonstrated documented improvement in social, emotional, and behavioral functioning Use best practices to: Document impact on educational outcomes. Document impact of social, emotional, and behavioral outcomes. Disaggregate student mental health service and support data to examine student-level outcomes based on subpopulation characteristics. Document and broadly report the impact of your comprehensive school mental health system. National School Mental Health Curriculum 7 Quality Indicators Quality Indicators: Documenting Tiers 2

and 3 Services and Supports Documenting Tiers 2 and 3 Services and Supports How many unduplicated* students were identified through a systematic screening or other referral process to possibly receive Early Intervention (Tier 2) and/or Treatment (Tier 3) services and supports? What was the total number of unduplicated* students who received at least one Tier 2 or Tier 3 school mental health service or support? How many unduplicated* students who received Tier 2 and/ or Tier 3 services and supports have documented improvement in: Educational functioning? Social, emotional or behavioral functioning?

*If a student received more than one type of Tier 2 or 3 service, the student should only be counted once. National School Mental Health Curriculum 8 NCSMH Student NCSMH Student Information Systems Brief Information Systems Brief Student Information Systems Promote early identification of students who need additional supports. Support decision-making about how to match student needs to services. Identify gaps in services that may need to be filled. Alert staff when a service or support is

not helping a student. Document the impact of services and supports on target outcomes. National School Mental Health Curriculum 9 Resources District Example One rural school district in Kansas created a systematic approach to document the impact of Tiers 2 and 3 services and supports on educational and social, emotional, and behavioral outcomes. Modeled after their documentation of Tiers 2 and 3 academic services, new codes were developed in PowerSchool (a student information system) to track referrals and provision of mental health Tiers 2 and 3 services. Their data showed that Tiers 2 and 3 mental health services and supports were provided to students with high levels of disciplinary events (68%), suspensions (55%), chronic absence (52%), and poverty

for 3 or more consecutive school years (65%). Based on one school year of data, they found that of students receiving Tiers 2 and 3 mental health services, 65% no longer required Tier 2 Language Arts supports and 61% no longer required Tier 2 Mathematics supports. National School Mental Health Curriculum 10 Reflection Questions to Consider Reflection: How effective is your districts process for gathering and using student data to inform decisions

about and understand the impact of services and supports? What student information system(s) does your district currently use to gather and report on student educational and social, emotional, and behavioral functioning? What improvements are needed to more effectively gather and use student data? What partnerships exist (or need to be established) to support data collection efforts?

11 Quality Indicator Quality Indicator To what extent did your district/school use best practices to document the impact of your CSMHSs effectiveness on educational outcomes? National School Mental Health Curriculum Best Practices Develop a theory of change about how mental health services or supports impact educational outcomes. Identify existing and potential data. Develop a plan for data collection.

Establish data infrastructure that allows for easy collection, analysis, and reporting. Examine educational data to understand student progress and service affect. Engage diverse individuals to provide qualitative feedback. 12 Select Educational Data That: Are likely to be affected by school mental health services and supports Are readily available or could be reasonably collected (e.g., attendance) Are of most importance and most useful to different groups who use, fund, or are affected by the services and supports Can be shared within and beyond the school team

National School Mental Health Curriculum 13 Quality Indicator Quality Indicator Best Practices To what extent did your district/ school use best practices to document the impact of your CSMHSs effectiveness on social, emotional, and behavioral outcomes? National School Mental Health Curriculum Develop a theory of change about how mental health services or supports affect social, emotional, and behavioral outcomes.

Identify existing and potential data. Develop a plan for data collection. Establish data infrastructure that allows for easy collection, analysis, and reporting. Examine social, emotional, and behavioral data to understand student progress and service impact. Engage diverse individuals to provide qualitative feedback. 14 Select Social, Emotional, and Behavioral Data That: Are likely to be affected by school mental health services and supports Are readily available or could be reasonably collected (e.g., selfreported distress and well-being) Are of most importance and most useful to different groups who use, fund, or are affected by the services and

supports Can be shared within and beyond the school team National School Mental Health Curriculum 15 https://healthysafechildren.org/learning-portal Resources: Learning Portal Lever, N., Connors, E., Freeman, E., & Stephan, S. (n.d.). 16 Resources Resources Program Evaluation Module

17 Continuum of Program Evaluation Module 18 Resources Quality Indicator Quality Indicator Best Practices To what extent did your district/ school use best practices to disaggregate student mental health service and support data to examine student outcomes based on subpopulation

characteristics? National School Mental Health Curriculum Review current student information or data. Add variables relevant to subpopulation characteristics and develop a data collection plan. Identify student outcomes that inform action steps to improve service delivery and effectiveness. Examine overall student outcomes and compare to outcomes for subpopulations. Develop strategies to address inequities or disparities in mental health access or outcomes. 19 Resources

Blueprint for for Using Data to Reduce Disparities/ Blueprint Using Data to Reduce Disparities/ Disproportionalities Disproportionalities Enables communities and states to develop and implement data-driven strategies Disaggregation of data to compare with local, county, state, or national data to assess differences and similarities or over- and underrepresentation

20 Martinez, K., Francis, K., Poirer, J., Brown, L., & Wang, M. (2013) Common Barriers to Collecting and Sharing Data Reflection: What barriers does your district have related to collecting or sharing data? What actions do you think could help address these barriers? National School Mental Health Curriculum Inability to share data across systems (e.g., school and community mental health

providers) Lack of staffing capacity Lack of technological options/infrastructure Lack of knowledge, training, or time to create a data collection system 21 Quality Indicator Quality Indicator Best Practices Develop reports and newsletters or host meetings to share data. To what extent did your district/ school use best practices to report the impact of your CSMHS to a broad and diverse group of stakeholders?

Prepare a 1-to 2-page document that compellingly communicates school mental health impact. Prepare an elevator speech that highlights students served and key impact. Present at relevant conferences and meetings. Develop a social marketing campaign. Use news media outlets to disseminate information about your services, supports, and impact. Use social media to communicate impact. Include information about CSMHS services and findings on the school or district website. National School Mental Health Curriculum 22 District Example One large Midwestern school district-community partnership developed a data system for community-partnered mental health

clinicians to submit Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaires for all students served in Tier 3 services every 3 to 6 months. After several years, there is now a large dataset that this team uses to monitor trends in student outcomes and the relation between mental health and academic outcomes, and to communicate findings to education partners and other stakeholders. The team has also successfully used the data to demonstrate the positive impact of mental health services on student outcomes and to leverage findings to secure additional state funding. National School Mental Health Curriculum 23 Reporting the Impact of School Mental Health Resources Reporting the Impact of School Mental Health

Safe Schools/Healthy Students state grantees State leaders are provided with a template with recommended sections: Background Highlights Local examples Quotes from key stakeholders Impact data Implications National School Mental Health Curriculum 24 Nevada Department of Education (n.d.) Resources Reporting the Impact of

Reporting the Impact of School Mental Health School Mental Health Safe Schools/Healthy Students grant program Features the goal of the program, framework, and national impact Can be customized to any multisite, multi-program effort to support student mental health and well-being National School Mental Health Curriculum 25 Nevada Department of Education (n.d.) Reporting Impact Reporting thethe

Impact of of anan Evidence-Based Program Evidence-Based Program Safe Schools/Healthy Students state grantees Infographic to illustrate impact of an evidence-based practice Description of intervention Participant details Impact data National School Mental Health Curriculum 26 (Safe Schools/Healthy Students, n.d.)

Resources Reflection Questions to Consider Reflection: What do you think would be the most compelling finding to highlight about school mental health in your district and how would you best share the information? National School Mental Health Curriculum 27

From whom are you trying to get buy-in? What matters most to this group? What can you share about school mental health that would matter to them? What qualitative information (e.g., success stories, descriptive experiences) would be useful?

How can you best share the information? Discussion Strategic Planning State a specific goal for your district within this domain. List 3 potential action steps to move this goal forward. Discussion How does this content fit with your district understanding and policy/practice related to documenting and sharing school mental health impact? National School Mental Health Curriculum 28

Resources Resources Connors, E., Moffa, K., Lever, N., & Hoover, S. (2019). Student information systems issue brief. National Center for School Mental Health, Baltimore, MD. Retrieved from http://bit.ly/SISbrief Lever, N., Connors, E., Freeman, E., & Stephan, S. (n.d.). Implementing a comprehensive school mental health program. Retrieved from: http://airhsdlearning.airws.org/SMHModule3/story_html5.html Martinez, K., Francis, K., Poirier, J.M., Brown, L.D., & Wang, M. (2013). Blueprint for using data to reduce disparities/disproportionalities in human services and behavioral health care. American Institutes for Research. Retrieved from https://www.air.org/resource/blueprint-using-data-reduce-disparities-disproportionalities-human-services-an d-behavioral Nevada Department of Education. (n.d.). Nevada state and community partnerships creating safe and healthy schools. Safe Schools/Healthy Students. Retrieved from https://healthysafechildren.org/sites/default/files/GranteeProfile-NV-508.pdf Safe Schools Healthy Students. (n.d.). PAX program fact sheet: Academic year 2015-2016. Retrieved from http://bit.ly/2Vzmh90 National School Mental Health Curriculum 29

References Lang, J. (2018). Connecticut update. Presented at the Healing Connecticuts Children: The Trauma Focused Evidence-Based Practice Conference, Hartford, CT. References Safe School/Healthy Students. (n.d.). Innovation that works: Children deserve to thrive: The Safe Schools/ Healthy Students difference. Retrieved from https://healthysafechildren.org/sites/default/files/SS-HS_infographic.PDF National School Mental Health Curriculum 30 Acknowledgments Acknowledgments This work is supported by grant SM081726 from the Department of Health and

Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Module content was developed by the National Center for School Mental Health in partnership with the MHTTC Network Coordinating Office. National School Mental Health Curriculum 31

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