New Leaders Charlotte

New Leaders Charlotte

DPAS II for Administrators: Principal Supervisor Training Summer 2015 Session Outcomes As a result of active participation, principal supervisors will: 1. Be prepared to implement the DPAS II for administrators appraisal cycle for principals in SY15-16 2. Increase their understanding of Delawares definition of effective principal leadership

3. Increase their skills in key areas of evaluation, including: assessing the quality of student performance targets helping principals establish leadership practice priorities providing accurate and actionable feedback to individual principals New Leaders, Inc. All rights reserved. | 2 Todays Agenda 1. Welcome and overview of the day 2. Review of Purpose of Principal Evaluation 3. Overview of the Principal Supervisor Guide for Evaluating Principals 4. Goal Setting

Assessing the quality of student performance targets Helping principals establish leadership practice priorities 5. Assessing Leadership Practice 6. Implementation: Early Adopters Sharing Practices 7. Close the day New Leaders, Inc. All rights reserved. | 3 Review of Purpose of Principal Evaluation Warm-up Think about your own experience as a principal. Think about how you were evaluated. Write down your reflections on these questions: What was the process?

How did your supervisor know how you were doing in your job? What aspects of being a principal were the focus of your evaluation? In what ways was your evaluation helpful? In what ways was it unhelpful? Turn to a partner and share your reflections with a neighbor. NewLeaders, Leaders,Inc. Inc.All Allrights rightsreserved. reserved. | | 5

New Leadership Matters Amplify Learning Outcomes Attract Great Teachers New Leaders, Inc. All rights reserved. | 6 Key Ideas in DPAS II for Administrators Provides space for professional judgment Supports professional growth

Assures continuous improvemen t of student outcomes Facilitates quality talent managemen t New Leaders, Inc. All rights reserved. | 7 Overview of Principal Supervisor Guide for Evaluating Principals The Guide

New Leaders, Inc. All rights reserved. | 9 Timing and Steps New Leaders, Inc. All rights reserved. | 10 Five Components of Principal Evaluation 1. VISION AND GOALS 2. TEACHING AND LEARNING 3. PEOPLE, SYSTEMS, AND OPERATIONS 4. PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITIES 5. STUDENT IMPROVEMENT

New Leaders, Inc. All rights reserved. | 11 Leadership Practice Components and Criteria 1. VISION AND GOALS 2. TEACHING AND LEARNING Develops a vision for high student achievement Establishes school goals and an aligned school plan using data Establishes and reinforces school values and

behaviors that align to the vision Develops cultural competence and a commitment to equity Implements rigorous curriculum and assessments aligned to Delaware State Standards Implements high-quality instructional practices Increases teacher effectiveness through support and evaluation Monitors student data to drive instructional practices 3. PEOPLE, SYSTEMS, AND OPERATIONS

4. PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITIES Manages resources in alignment with the school plan Organizes school time to support all student learning and staff development priorities Ensures school operations align with mandated policies

Hires and retains high-performing staff members Develops a high-performing leadership team Builds professional relationships and constructively manages change Engages in self-reflection and on-going professional development Demonstrates relentless focus, proactive problem solving and advocacy for students Engages families and the community in student learning New Leaders, Inc. All rights reserved. | 12

Assessing Leadership Practice (Components 1-4) Highly Effective Expert level of performance across components + build the capacity of others to lead Effective Effective leadership practices across components Needs Improvement Knowledge and awareness of effective leadership practices, but not consistent execution Ineffective Unacceptable levels of performance on one or more components New Leaders, Inc. All rights reserved. | 13 Assessing Student Improvement (Component V) New Leaders, Inc. All rights reserved. | 14

Key Steps: Goal-Setting Student Improvement (Required) Two goals (ELA/Math + Other) Measure, baseline data, and target Leadership Priority Areas (Recommended) Leadership actions connected to criteria Indicators of success New Leaders, Inc. All rights reserved. | 15 Key Steps: Evidence Collection Direct Observation Indirect

Observation Artifacts School Data The evaluator is physically present in the school or venue where the administrato r is present and leading The evaluator is

observing systems that but operate without the leader present Materials that document principal practice Concrete results of a leaders work New Leaders, Inc. All rights reserved. | 16

Key Steps: Evidence Collection New Leaders, Inc. All rights reserved. | 17 Key Steps: Mid-Year Conference Critical Questions: What actions has the principal taken to accomplish goals? What positive accomplishments would the principal share? What evidence exists of progress toward goals? What resources/supports does the principal need to help accomplish their goals? New Leaders, Inc. All rights reserved. | 18 Key Steps: Summative Evaluation Leadership Practice (Components 1-4) Student Improvement

(Component 5) Effective (E) or Highly Effective (HE) on all four Exceeds E or HE on at least three + No Ineffective (I) Satisfactory (or higher) Needs Improvement E or HE on one or two + Fewer than three I Satisfactory (or higher)

Needs Improvement E or HE on three or more Unsatisfactory Needs Improvement E or HE on three + one I Satisfactory (or higher) Ineffective E or HE on zero, one or two Unsatisfactory Ineffective

E or HE on zero Satisfactory (or higher) Ineffective Three or more I Any rating Highly Effective Effective New Leaders, Inc. All rights reserved. | 19 Processing Take 10 minutes to read back through the guide. Then we will take questions to ensure your understanding.

QUESTIONS? New Leaders, rights reserved.| 20 | New Leaders, Inc.Inc. AllAll rights reserved. Goal-Setting: Assessing the Quality of Student Improvement Goals

Alignment of Improvement Goals State of Delaware accountability system and goals District performance targets and multi-year goals School performance targets and multi-year goals Administrator Student improvement goals Teacher Student performance measures New Leaders, Inc. All rights reserved. | 22 Guiding Principles for Goal-Setting

Select the right measures Set the right targets Determine how progress to goals will be assessed mid-year and EOY Identify leadership priority areas connected to goals (Recommended) New Leaders, Inc. All rights reserved. | 23 The Student Improvement Goal Quality Test Data Analysis

Explain how the goal demonstrates alignment to district priorities. Does the goals provide an opportunity for the school to move in a coordinated effort toward increases in student achievement? Provide a rationale. Explain how the assessments help you track progress on the goals and what important benchmarks exist throughout the year. Explain how the measures allow you to track growth in addition to attainment, particularly if the goal calls for it. Alignment Measures

Strategies How does the goal address a critical area of growth, a grade or subject not included in state assessment data, or/and a sub-group that has been underperforming at your school? Is the target informed and driven by past performance? Describe. Describe how the principal identified strategies (Components I-IV) will support the target that has been set. Have teachers in appropriate grades and subjects linked their goals to the school-wide goal? . New Leaders, Inc. All rights reserved. | 24 Principal Student Improvement Goal: An example Time bound to June, but set up to

track progress on DRA2 benchmark administrations throughout year. Reading level set up to monitor and measure student growth. This goal also addresses grades not tested in state assessment data. By June 2016, 85% K-2nd grade students at Breakwater Elementary will grow at least 5 levels in reading comprehension, oral reading, and fluency as measured by DRA2 assessment. Reading comprehension is a critical area of growth for all students in all subgroups at Breakwater. Assessment measure has three administrations which allows for monitoring benchmark growth toward

goal. Grade level goals are clearly outlined. Setting ambitious goals for students early on is instrumental in moving toward district goal of all students reading at or above grade level by 3rd grade, The Breakwater Promise. New Leaders, Inc. All rights reserved. | 25 Work Session: Write Student Improvement Goals Think about the school you led as a principal. Consider if you were going to led the school again this year. Step 1: Diagnose and understand the current state of the school as best you can.

Student data identify key areas of need School wide data priority areas for improved student achievement Self-assessment from your prior years evaluation District/superintendent priorities Look back at the quality test questions Step 2: Complete the Goal-Setting Form as if you were principal. Step 3: Complete the Leadership Priority Areas as if you were the principal. New Leaders, Inc. All rights reserved. | 26 Give Feedback | Get Feedback Take your Goal Setting Form and 1. Find a partner from a different table who you do not know or

have not worked with today 2. Each partner will get 3 minutes to read the completed form and describe the intentional through line from measure to target 3. After the measures/targets are shared the partner will ask clarifying questions, apply the quality test, and identify strengths 4. We will do this cycle twice so each partner gives feedback and gets feedback

5. The cycle ends when you return to your seat to refine your measure after the quality test New Leaders, Inc. All rights reserved. | 27 Sharing Best Practices: Goal Setting Some principal supervisors who have already implemented the new system of principal evaluation are here to share their perspectives on setting goals. When do you do your goal-setting process with principals? What prep work do you and your principals do in advance?

How do you structure your conversations? How do you make the links between student improvement goals and leadership performance areas? Walk through your own process for assessing the quality of student improvement goals. Additional questions? New Leaders, rights reserved.| 28 |

New Leaders, Inc.Inc. AllAll rights reserved. Checking for Understanding What strikes you as critical when carrying out this process in your own district? What needs to be in place to get a robust goal-setting process ready to go for 2015-2016? What questions, concerns, ideas do you have about goal setting? New Leaders, rights reserved.| 29 |

New Leaders, Inc.Inc. AllAll rights reserved. Assessing Leadership Practice Effective Leadership Brainstorm Take 5 minutes on your own to list what it takes skills, knowledge, habits, mindsets to be an effective principal in your school district Share and compare with your table group. Where are there similarities? Differences? Together as a team, prioritize the top ten from the lists and put them up on chart paper. Post the paper when you are finished. Take a gallery walk. New

Leaders, rights reserved.| 31 | New Leaders, Inc.Inc. AllAll rights reserved. Toward a Shared Vision of Principal Effectiveness Practice based on each districts definition of effectiveness Practice supported

by a common definition Practice supported by a common definition and shared practice New Leaders, Inc. All rights reserved. | 32 Standards and Rubric Connection DPAS II Component Delaware Administrator Standards (Six ISLLC) 1. Vision and Goals A vision of Learning

2. Teaching and Learning School Culture 3. People, Systems and Operations The Management of Learning 4. Professional Responsibilities Family and Community Collaboration Ethics Societal Context New Leaders, Inc. All rights reserved. | 33 Rubric Design

Directly linked to ISLLC standards. Each component has four criteria and are the basis upon which the performance of an administrator is evaluated. Each criterion has four performance levels described in the rubric. New Leaders, Inc. All rights reserved. | 34 Content and Language of the Rubric Provides lens for evaluating administrators Articulates new performance descriptors for highly effective and effective leadership

Provides common language to describe leadership practice Puts focus on evidence to describe level of performance Orients feedback toward professional growth with descriptors New Leaders, Inc. All rights reserved. | 35 Put Component 1 into Practice: Video Case Study Hyattsville Middle School Observation: Directions:

Watch and listen to Ms. Washington, Hyattsville Middle Schools principal, as she describes a culture that interfered with student achievement. Watch and listen for culture impact and its effect on their vision. This short video clip offers a glimpse of the impact of culture New Leaders, Inc. All rights reserved. | 36 Scripting Observation Notes When note-taking during observations, capture descriptive statements of what you see and hear.

Evidence Judgment Principal speaks to all students & teachers as she starts her school day offering positive comments, nods, recognition and engages in quick conversation. Principals friendly comments and attitudes to teachers and students are received in a positive way. Judgment is a conclusion based on what you see. Ultimately you will have to make a judgment, but you need specific, observable evidence first. New Leaders, Inc. All rights reserved. | 38

Read Component 1 Read Component 1: Vision and Goals across the performance levels. Begin at the criterion level. Next read the indicator language across from highly effective to ineffective. New Leaders, Inc. All rights reserved. | 39 Read the Effective Column of the Rubric New Leaders, Inc. All rights reserved. | 40 Discuss in pairs What features stand out to you as you read down the effective column in Component One: Vision and Goals? Note areas in in Component One: Vision and Goals that

aligns to your tables brainstorm about what it takes to be an effective principal in your district. What area(s) present challenges to determining effectiveness? Why? New Leaders, rights reserved.| 41 | New Leaders, Inc.Inc. AllAll rights reserved. Put Component 1 into Practice: Video Case Study Part 2 Hyattsville Middle School

Observation: Watch and listen as Ms. Washington, Hyattsville Middle Schools principal, creates a Success Web while working with her Leadership Team focusing on students as they create a vision for all students to succeed. Directions: Take notes while you view the video clip. We will only collect evidence for Component One: Vision and Goals.

As you watch the video, only record evidence that you can see or hear. Try to suspend any judgment. New Leaders, Inc. All rights reserved. | 42 Put Component 1 into Practice: Video Case Study Video Debrief : What evidence of principal practice in Component One: Vision and Goals were you able to see in this video? What did you see and hear in this video that aligns to Component One: vision and goals? Come to agreements about WHAT you saw

and heard as a table. Based on the evidence collected, how would you describe the practice on the performance continuum? (Highly Effective, Effective, Needs Improvement, Ineffective?) Why? Calibrate as a table and be ready to defend your answer with concrete evidence. New Leaders, rights reserved.| 44 | New Leaders,

Inc.Inc. AllAll rights reserved. Read Component 2: Teaching and Learning Read the full text of component 2. Criteria and Performance levels. Pay special attention to the distinctions in language between Highly Effective and Effective. What does your group notice about the distinctions between an effective principal and a highly effective principal? New Leaders, Inc. All rights reserved. | 45

Put Component 2 into Practice: Video Case Study East Mary Harris Mother Jones Elementary School Observation: In this video you are going to see Principal Brown leading her team as she focuses on developing teacher leaders. Directions: Take notes while you view two related video clips. We will only collect evidence for Component Two: Culture of Learning

As you watch the video, only record evidence that you can see or hear. Try to suspend any judgment. New Leaders, Inc. All rights reserved. | 46 Distinctions Effective Highly Effective New Leaders, Inc. All rights reserved. | 48 Components 3 and 4 Close Read

Rubric Study: Components 3-4 Read the practice descriptors across the performance levels from Highly Effective to Ineffective for the assigned Component. Each owner will be responsible to complete the following: 1. Study the assigned component first individually, then be ready to discuss key features of the component 2. Select a particular criterion within the component and summarizes the differences between the levels of performance and how you would assess for a principal on this criterion 3.

Share observations with the a partner(s) New Leaders, Inc. All rights reserved. | 50 Sharing Best Practices: Using a Rubric Some principal supervisors who have already implemented the new system of principal evaluation are here to share their perspectives on using the rubric. How have you used the rubric as a tool for reflective practice, professional growth? What has been most helpful about the rubric? What has been most challenging? Have you devised ways to address the challenges?

What tools and methods are you using to generate evidence? Additional questions? New Leaders, rights reserved.| 51 | New Leaders, Inc.Inc. AllAll rights reserved.

Bringing it Together Case Study Directions 1. Make four small groups. Each group will cover one component of the DPAS II rubric. 2. Read the Breakwater Elementary School Case Study. Discuss the evidence in the case study as it relates to your assigned Component. 3. Calibrate the evidence and agree across group members the level of performance for the Component. 4.

One group member will share the final rating for the Component and the rationale/evidence for that rating with large group. New Leaders, Inc. All rights reserved. | 52 Closing the Effective Leadership Loop Look back at the brainstorm of effective leaders in your district. Many of the attributes we already use to define effective principals are found in the DPAS II administrator rubric. We often use different language to describe

effective principals; the rubric gives us common language AND focuses primarily on evidence of performance. New Leaders, Inc. All rights reserved. | 53 Implementation: Consultation with Early Adopters Getting Ready for Implementation Take 15 minutes to sketch out key actions step for yourself? What do I need to communicate now to principals I supervise? What actions do I need to take before the school year starts?

What questions do I still have? Find a new partner and share your action steps. Facilitators will float to give feedback and address questions. New Leaders, rights reserved.| 55 | New Leaders, Inc.Inc. AllAll rights

reserved. Close the Day Wrap up Complete evaluation form, please e Thank you so much for your contributions today! New Leaders, Inc. All rights reserved. | 57 Mission Our mission is to ensure high academic achievement for all children, especially students in poverty and students of color, by developing transformational school

leaders and advancing the policies and practices that allow great leaders to succeed. Vision We envision a day when there is educational excellence and equity in America when our countrys public schools ensure that every student is prepared for success in college, careers and citizenship. www.newleaders.org

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