Poetry Meter and Rhyme - Hortonville Area School District

Poetry Meter and Rhyme - Hortonville Area School District

Poetry Meter and Rhyme What is Poetic Meter? Poetic meter is a generally regular pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables. It is like the rhythmic beat that draws you into music Tyger! Tyger! burning bright In the forests of the night, What immortal hand or eye

Could frame thy fearful symmetry? from The Tyger by William Blake What is a Poetic Foot? A foot is a meters basic unit. A foot consists of one stressed syllable and usually one or more unstressed syllables. Stressed syllables are marked with a (/) above syllable Unstressed syllables are marked with a () above the

syllable mu-sic, for-mu-la In the yard, sing-ing in the rain At noon, the tel-e-phone rang. Basic Metrical Feet

The five basic metrical feet are Iamb unstressed syllable followed by a stressed syllable (da DAH) But soft! What light through yonder window breaks? From Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare Trochee

stressed syllable followed by an unstressed syllable (DAH da) Thou, when thou returnst, wilt tell me from Song by John Donne Basic Metrical Feet Spondee Black two stressed syllables (DAH DAH) rain, and fire, and hail will burst: oh, hear!

From Ode to the West Wind by Percy Bysshe Shelley Anapest On two unstressed syllables the twinkling grass From To a Skylark by Percy Bysshe Shelley Basic Metrical Feet Dactyl one stressed syllable followed by two unstressed

syllables (DAH da da) Like to the lark at the break of day arising from Sonnet 29 by William Shakespeare Counting Metrical Feet To describe the number of feet in a line of poetry, use the following terms: dimeter two metrical feet per line

trimeter three metrical feet per line tetrameter four metrical feet per line pentameter hexameter five metrical feet per line six metrical feet per line

Scansion: Analyzing Poetic Meter Scansion is the act of analyzing poetic meter. To scan a poem, follow these steps. Step 1: Read through the poem, marking stressed and unstressed syllables. Step

2: If possible, identify the type of foot used most often in each line (iamb, trochee, spondee, anapest, Scansion: Analyzing Poetic Meter Step 3: If the poem has a regular meter, count the number of feet per line to determine the name of the metrical pattern. The metrical pattern consists of the name of the meter, followed by the

number of feet. Iambic pentameter, trochaic hexameter, dactylic trimester, etc. Scanning a Poem Had we but world enough, and time, This coyness, Lady, were no crime. We would sit down, and think which way To walk, and pass our long loves day. from To His Coy Mistress by Andrew Marvel What is Rhyme? Rhyme is the musical quality produced through the repetition of accented vowel sounds and all sounds following them in words that

are close together in a poem. The fair breeze blew, the white foam flew, The furrow followed free; We were the first that every burst Into that silent sea. from The Rime of the Ancient mariner by Samuel Taylor Coleridge Types of Rhymes End rhyme occurs at the ends of lines. Tyger! Tyger! burning bright In the forests of the night, from The Tyger by William Blake

Internal rhyme occurs within lines. Out of the sea came he! And he shone bright, and on the right from The Rime of the Ancient mariner by Samuel Taylor Coleridge Types of Rhymes Approximate rhyme occurs when words sound similar but do not rhyme exactly. Willows whiten, aspens quiver, Little breezes dusk and shiver Through the wave that runs forever By the island in the river from The lady of Shalott by Alfred Lord Tennyson

Identifying a Rhyme Scheme The rhyme scheme is the pattern of rhymed lines in a poem. Identify the rhyme scheme by giving each new end rhyme a new letter. (lower case) Whateer the theme, the Maiden sang As if her song could have no ending I saw her singing at her work, And oer the sickle bending;I listend, motionless and still; And, as I mounted up the hill, The music in my heart I bore, Long after it was heard no more. from The Solitary Reaper by William Wordsworth The End

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