Polynomials and Polynomial Functions - Andrews University

Polynomials and Polynomial Functions - Andrews University

Polynomials and Polynomial Functions Algebra 2 Chapter 5 This Slideshow was developed to accompany the textbook Larson Algebra 2 By Larson, R., Boswell, L., Kanold, T. D., & Stiff, L. 2011 Holt McDougal Some examples and diagrams are taken from the textbook.

Slides created by Richard Wright, Andrews Academy [email protected] 5.1 Use Properties of Exponents When numbers get very big or very small, such as the mass of the sun = kg or the size of a cell = m, we use scientific notation to write the numbers in less space than they normally would take.

The properties of exponents will help you understand how to work with scientific notation. 5.1 Use Properties of Exponents What is an exponent and what does it mean? A superscript on a number. It tells the number of times the number is multiplied by itself. Example; x3 = x x x

Base Exponent 5.1 Use Properties of Exponents Properties of exponents product property x2 x3 =

power of a product property (2 x)3 = power of a power property (23)4 = quotient property

power of a quotient property 5.1 Use Properties of Exponents zero exponent property negative exponent property 23 = 22 = 21 = 20 = 2-1

= 2-2 = 2-3 = 5.1 Use Properties of Exponents 5-4 53 = ((-3)2)3 =

(32x2y)2 = 5.1 Use Properties of Exponents 5 2 12 2 4 2 2 3

5.1 Use Properties of Exponents To multiply or divide scientific notation think of the leading numbers as the coefficients and the power of 10 as the base and exponent. Example: 333 #3-23 every other odd, 25-43 odd, 49

8 25 Homework Quiz 5.1 Homework Quiz 5.2 Evaluate and Graph Polynomial Functions

Large branches of mathematics spend all their time dealing with polynomials. They can be used to model many complicated systems.

5.2 Evaluate and Graph Polynomial Functions Polynomial in one variable Function that has one variable and there are powers of that variable and all the powers are positive 4x3 + 2x2 + 2x + 5 100x1234 25x345 + 2x + 1 2/x Not Polynomials in one 3xy2 variable. 5.2 Evaluate and Graph Polynomial

Functions Degree Highest power of the variable What is the degree? 4x3 + 2x2 + 2x + 5

5.2 Evaluate and Graph Polynomial Functions Types of Polynomial Functions Degree Type 0 Constant y = 2 1 Linear y = 2x + 1 2 Quadratic y = 2x2 + x 1 3 Cubic y = 2x3 + x2 + x 1 4 Quartic y = 2x4 + 2x2 1

5.2 Evaluate and Graph Polynomial Functions Functions f(x) = 4x3 + 2x2 + 2x + 5 means that this polynomial has the name f and the variable x f(x) does not mean f times x! Direct Substitution Example: find f(3) 5.2 Evaluate and Graph Polynomial

Functions Synthetic Substitution Example: find f(2) if f(y) = -y6 + 4y4 + 3y2 + 2y Coefficients with placeholders 2 f(2) = 16 -1 -1

0 -2 -2 4 -4 0 0 0 0 3

0 3 2 6 8 0 16 16 5.2 Evaluate and Graph Polynomial

Functions End Behavior Polynomial functions always go towards or - at either end of the graph Leading Coefficient + Even Degree Odd Degree Write f(x) + as x - and f(x) + as x +

Leading Coefficient - 5.2 Evaluate and Graph Polynomial Functions Graphing polynomial functions Make a table of values Plot the points Make sure the graph matches the appropriate end behavior 5.2 Evaluate and Graph Polynomial Functions

Graph f(x) = x3 + 2x 4 341 #1-49 every other odd, 55, 59 5 20 Homework Quiz 5.2 Homework Quiz

5.3 Add, Subtract, and Multiply Polynomials Adding, subtracting, and multiplying are always good things to know how to do. Sometimes you might want to combine two or more models into one big model.

5.3 Add, Subtract, and Multiply Polynomials Adding and subtracting polynomials Add or subtract the coefficients of the terms with the same power. Called combining like terms. Examples: (5x2 + x 7) + (-3x2 6x 1) (3x3 + 8x2 x 5) (5x3 x2 + 17) 5.3 Add, Subtract, and Multiply

Polynomials Multiplying polynomials Use the distributive property Examples: (x 3)(x + 4) (x + 2)(x2 + 3x 4) 5.3 Add, Subtract, and Multiply

Polynomials (x 1)(x + 2)(x + 3) 5.3 Add, Subtract, and Multiply Polynomials Special Product Patterns Sum and Difference (a b)(a + b) = a2 b2

Square of a Binomial (a b)2 = a2 2ab + b2 Cube of a Binomial (a b)3 = a3 3a2b + 3ab2 b3 5.3 Add, Subtract, and Multiply Polynomials (x + 2)3 349 #1-61 every other odd

(x 3)2 4 20 Homework Quiz 5.3 Homework Quiz

5.4 Factor and Solve Polynomial Equations A manufacturer of shipping cartons who needs to make cartons for a specific use often has to use special relationships between the length, width, height, and volume to find the exact dimensions of the carton. The dimensions can usually be found by writing and solving a

polynomial equation. This lesson looks at how factoring can be used to solve such equations. 5.4 Factor and Solve Polynomial Equations How to Factor 1. Greatest Common Factor Comes from the distributive property If the same number or variable is in each of the terms, you can bring the number to the front times everything that is left. 3x2y + 6xy 9xy2 =

Look for this first! 5.4 Factor and Solve Polynomial Equations 2. Check to see how many terms Two terms Difference of two squares: a2 b2 = (a b)(a + b) 9x2 y4 = Sum of Two Cubes: a3 + b3 = (a + b)(a2 ab + b2)

8x3 + 27 = Difference of Two Cubes: a3 b3 = (a b)(a2 + ab + b2) y3 8 = 5.4 Factor and Solve Polynomial Equations Three terms General Trinomials 1. 2. 3. 4.

5. ax2 + bx + c Write two sets of parentheses ( Guess and Check The Firsts multiply to make ax2 The Lasts multiply to make c The Outers + Inners make bx x2 + 7x + 10 = x2 + 3x 18 = 6x2 7x 20 =

)( ) 5.4 Factor and Solve Polynomial Equations Four terms Grouping Group the terms into sets of two so that you can factor

a common factor out of each set Then factor the factored sets (Factor twice) b3 3b2 4b + 12 = 3. 5.4 Factor and Solve Polynomial Equations Try factoring more! Examples: a2x b2x + a2y b2y =

5.4 Factor and Solve Polynomial Equations 3a2z 27z = n4 81 = 5.4 Factor and Solve Polynomial Equations

Solving Equations by Factoring Make = 0 Factor Make each factor = 0 because if one factor is zero, 0 time anything = 0 5.4 Factor and Solve Polynomial Equations 2x5 = 18x

356 #1, 5, 9-29 odd, 33-41 odd, 45, 47, 49, 53, 57, 0 61, 65 25 Homework Quiz 5.4 Homework Quiz

5.5 Apply the Remainder and Factor Theorems So far we done add, subtracting, and multiplying polynomials. Factoring is similar to division, but it isnt really division. Today we will deal with real polynomial division. 5.5 Apply the Remainder and Factor Theorems Long Division Done just like long division with numbers

5.5 Apply the Remainder and Factor Theorems 3 2 +4 3 +10 +2

5.5 Apply the Remainder and Factor Theorems Synthetic Division Shortened form of long division for dividing by a binomial Only when dividing by (x r) 5.5 Apply the Remainder and Factor Theorems Synthetic Division Example: (-5x5 -21x4 3x3 +4x2 + 2x +2) / (x + 4)

Coefficients with placeholders -4 -5 -21 -3 20 4 -1 1 -5 4

-4 0 6 5 + +2+ + 4 4 3 2 2 0

2 2 -8 -6 5.5 Apply the Remainder and Factor Theorems (2y5 + 64)(2y + 4)-1 -2

1 1 0 -2 -2 y4 2y3 + 4y2 8y + 16 2 y 5 64 y 5 32

2y 4 y 2 0 4 4 0 -8 -8 0 16

16 32 -32 0 5.5 Apply the Remainder and Factor Theorems Remainder Theorem if polynomial f(x) is divided by the binomial (x a), then the remainder equals f(a).

Synthetic substitution Example: if f(x) = 3x4 + 6x3 + 2x2 + 5x + 9, find f(9) Use synthetic division using (x 9) and see remainder. 5.5 Apply the Remainder and Factor Theorems Synthetic Substitution if f(x) = 3x4 + 6x3 + 2x2 + 5x + 9, find f(9) Coefficients with placeholders 9

3 3 f(9) = 24273 9 6 2 5 27 2972691 24264 33 299269624273

5.5 Apply the Remainder and Factor Theorems The Factor Theorem The binomial x a is a factor of the polynomial f(x) iff f(a) = 0

5.5 Apply the Remainder and Factor Theorems Using the factor theorem, you can find the factors (and zeros) of polynomials Simply use synthetic division using your first zero (you get these off of problem or off of the graph where they cross the x-axis) The polynomial answer is one degree less and is called the depressed polynomial. Divide the depressed polynomial by the next zero and get the next depressed

polynomial. Continue doing this until you get to a quadratic which you can factor or use the quadratic formula to solve. 5.5 Apply the Remainder and Factor Theorems Show that x 2 is a factor of x3 + 7x2 + 2x 40. Then find the remaining factors. 366 #3-33 odd, 41, 43

2 20 Homework Quiz 5.5 Homework Quiz 5.6 Find Rational Zeros Rational Zero Theorem Given a polynomial function, the rational zeros will be in the

form of p/q where p is a factor of the last (or constant) term and q is the factor of the leading coefficient. 5.6 Find Rational Zeros List all the possible rational zeros of f(x) = 2x3 + 2x2 - 3x + 9 5.6 Find Rational Zeros Find all rational zeros of f(x) = x3 - 4x2 - 2x + 20 374 #3-21 odd, 25-35 odd, 41, 45, 47 1

20 Homework Quiz 5.6 Homework Quiz 5.7 Apply the Fundamental Theorem of

Algebra When you are finding the zeros, how do you know when you are finished? Today we will learn about how many zeros there are for each polynomial function. 5.7 Apply the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra Fundamental Theorem of Algebra A polynomial function of degree greater than zero has at least

one zero. These zeros may be imaginary however. There is the same number of zeros as there is degree you may have the same zero more than once though. Example x2 + 6x + 9=0 (x + 3)(x + 3)=0 zeros are -3 and 3 5.7 Apply the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra Complex Conjugate Theorem

If the complex number a + bi is a zero, then a bi is also a zero. Complex zeros come in pairs Irrational Conjugate Theorem If is a zero, then so is 5.7 Apply the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra

Given a function, find the zeros of the function. 5.7 Apply the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra Write a polynomial function that has the given zeros. 2, 4i 5.7 Apply the Fundamental Theorem

of Algebra Descartes Rule of Signs If f(x) is a polynomial function, then The number of positive real zeros is equal to the number of sign changes in f(x) or less by even number. The number of negative real zeros is equal to the number of sign changes in f(-x) or less by even number. 5.7 Apply the Fundamental

Theorem of Algebra Determine the possible number of positive real zeros, negative real zeros, and imaginary zeros for g(x) = 2x4 3x3 + 9x2 12x + 4 Positive zeros: 4, 2, or 0 Negative zeros: g(-x) = 2x4 + 3x3 + 9x2 + 12x + 4 0 Positive Negative Imaginary

Total 4 0 0 4 2 0

2 4 0 0 4 4 383 #1-49 every other odd, 53, 57, 61

4 20 Homework Quiz 5.7 Homework Quiz 5.8 Analyze Graphs of Polynomial Functions

If we have a polynomial function, then k is a zero or root k is a solution of f(x) = 0 k is an x-intercept if k is real x k is a factor 5.8 Analyze Graphs of Polynomial Functions Use x-intercepts to graph a polynomial function

f(x) = (x + 2)2(x 3) since (x + 2) and (x 3) are factors of the polynomial, the xintercepts are -2 and 3 plot the x-intercepts Create a table of values to finish plotting points around the xintercepts Draw a smooth curve through the points 5.8 Analyze Graphs of Polynomial Functions Graph f(x) = (x + 2)2(x 3)

5.8 Analyze Graphs of Polynomial Functions Turning Points Local Maximum and minimum (turn from going up to down or down to up) The graph of every polynomial function of degree n can have at most n-1 turning points. If a polynomial function has n distinct real zeros, the function will have exactly n-1 turning points. Calculus lets you find the turning points easily.

5.8 Analyze Graphs of Polynomial Functions What are the turning points? 390 #3-21 odd, 31, 35-41 odd 5 20 Homework Quiz

5.8 Homework Quiz 5.9 Write Polynomial Functions and Models You keep asking, Where will I ever use this? Well today we are going to model a few situations with polynomial functions. 5.9 Write Polynomial Functions and Models

Writing a function from the x-intercepts and one point Write the function as factors with an y = a(x p)(x q) Use the other point to find a Example: x-intercepts are -2, 1, 3 and (0, 2) a in front 5.9 Write Polynomial Functions and Models

Show that the nth-order differences for the given function of degree n are nonzero and constant. Find the values of the function for equally spaced intervals Find the differences of the y values Find the differences of the differences and repeat until all are the same value 5.9 Write Polynomial Functions and Models Show that the 3rd order differences are constant of

5.9 Write Polynomial Functions and Models Finding a model given several points Find the degree of the function by finding the finite differences Degree = order of constant nonzero finite differences Write the basic standard form functions (i.e. f(x) = ax3 + bx2 + cx + d

Fill in x and f(x) with the points Use some method to find a, b, c, and d Cramers rule or graphing calculator using matrices or computer program 5.9 Write Polynomial Functions and Models Find a polynomial function to fit: f(1) = -2, f(2) = 2, f(3) = 12, f(4) = 28, f(5) = 50, f(6) = 78

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 5.9 Write Polynomial Functions and Models Regressions on TI Graphing Calculator Push STAT Edit Clear lists, then enter xs in 1st column and ys in 2nd

Push STAT CALC (regression of your choice) Push ENTER twice Read your answer 5.9 Write Polynomial Functions and Models Regressions using Microsoft Excel 1. Enter xs and ys into 2 columns 2. Insert X Y Scatter Chart 3. In Chart Tools: Layout pick Trendline More Trendline options 4. Pick a Polynomial trendline and enter the degree of your function AND pick Display Equation on Chart 5. Click Done

6. Read your answer off of the chart. 397 #1-25 odd, 29 1 15 Homework Quiz 5.9 Homework Quiz 5.Review Page 1014#531 odd,

407#choose 6 = 20 problems

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