As you walk in: Grab some breakfast &

As you walk in:  Grab some breakfast &

As you walk in: Grab some breakfast & coffee! Please sign in Pick up the following items: Personalized Binder Cover Name Tag Binder Solar System Exploration Pre-Service Teacher Institute Christine Shupla, Education Lead

Carol Waters, Education Specialist Dr. Alexandra Matiella Novak, Education Specialist LPI Education Facebook Page WiFi Password = marsorbust Lets get to know your binder! Table of Contents Organized by topic Tab 1 Resources Agenda Participant Contact Info. Presenter Contact Info. Be a Fan! Implementation Notes

Cornell Note Paper Solar System Essential Question How can using scale models of the solar system help students understand scale, orbit, and limitations of models? Size & Scale of the Solar System What is accurate about this depiction of the solar system? What is not accurate? Size & Scale of the Solar System What pre-conceptions do you think your audiences may have about the size and scale of the solar system?

In general, how do the sizes of planets and the distances between them change as you go away from the sun? How does the Sun-Jupiter distance compare to the Sun-Saturn distance? Sorting the Solar System What are the objects in our solar system? Work with your team to organize the cards into categories There is no right or wrong way If you finish early, re-sort into new categories Which types of categories are useful? Creative and unique? Why do we sort objects into categories?

A Think-Pair-Share Assessment The intent is to ask questions that require the students to use reasoning and critical thinking skills, then invite them to share their thoughts with each other. These are not fair test questions. Best procedures: read quietly to yourself (so you dont give any subconscious clues) As the instructor, we read it too, for timing, then ask if anyone needs more time If not, its time to vote simultaneouslyuse your fingers, right in front of your chest so others dont see (anonymous) An Assessment If the Sun were the size of a large

pizza (40 cm), then Earth would be about as big as 1. A slice of pepperoni (about 5 cm) 2. A small piece of diced onion (about 0.5 cm) 3. A red pepper flake (about 0.5 mm) 4. A medium pizza (about 30 cm) Arrange the following according to distance from Earth (from least to greatest): 1. Mercury, Saturn, the North Star, the Andromeda Galaxy 2. The North Star, Saturn, Mercury, Andromeda Galaxy

3. Saturn, Mercury, the North Star, the Andromeda Galaxy 4. Mercury, Saturn, the Andromeda Galaxy, the North Star 5. Two of these are the same distance Which of these analogies works best? 1. Saturn: Solar System as electron: atom 2. Earth: Solar System as atomic nucleus: atom 3. Solar System: Galaxy as atom: proton 4. North Star: Solar System as neutron: atom 5. Jupiter: Mercury as electron:

proton Seasons Essential Question How can analyzing data and using models help students understand the Sun-Earth system and seasons? Seasons in the Sun What would you be wearing if you were in Nairobi, Kenya today? Temperatures for January 2016 (Daily Average) Temperatures for July 2016

(Daily Average) Temperatures around the World: Heating Things JanuaryUp April July October Average Daily High Temperature s (C) in Tourist Cities)) Anchorage (Alaska)

-4 6 18 5 Buenos Aires (Argentina) 29 22 15

22 Cape Town (South Africa) 28 23 18 21 Caracas (Venezuela) 25

27 26 27 Houston (Texas) 15 25 33 26

London (United Kingdom) 9 15 23 16 Mexico City (Mexico) 21 25

22 23 Montreal (Canada) -4 11 26 14 Nairobi (Kenya)

26 25 22 27 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) 30 28 25

26 Singapore (Singapore) 30 31 31 31 Stockholm (Sweden) -1

9 22 10 Sydney (Australia) 26 23 17 22

Tokyo (Japan) 8 17 28 20 Lets Graph Each person will graph data for 3 cities on their graph sheet; each table should collaborate so that all of the cities are graphed.

Graphs will be line graphs. Please label each graph with the name of the city. You have 4 minutes to complete this part of the activity. 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

january april july october Color-code and Analyze Your Data Each table will color-code the cities on their maps, based on the shape of the graphs: Flat graphs are green Increasing then decreasing (mountainshaped) graphs are red Decreasing then increasing (valley-shaped) graphs are blue

100 80 You have 5 minutes for 60 40 this task 20 0 january april july october Map for Heating Things Up

Discussion Comparison by latitude Comparison by geographic location Modifications? Celsius vs. Fahrenheit Map (projected or regular) Using markers over initial graphs Using color-coded dots next to cities Reason for Seasons: Preliminary Topics Before students can understand the reason for seasons, they need to understand: The Earth orbits the Sun in a year When the Sun is higher in the sky, the sunlight is

more intense (we receive more energy) The scale of the Sun and Earths sizes and distance. Students have misconceptions that make this particularly difficult: Some confuse rotation and revolution Many think were closer to the Sun in summer Some think Earth takes a day to orbit the Sun Some think the tilt makes us closer to the Sun Some think the tilt changes directions as Earth orbits Reasons for Seasons Model the motion of the Earth around the Sun: Keep its axis tilted toward the North Star (Polaris) Identify the different seasons

Initial questions: As your model of Earth orbits the Sun, which position in its orbit would you predict for summer here in Columbus? Which position in its orbit would you predict for winter in Australia? You have 3 minutes for this task Reasons for Seasons One person in each group facilitateseveryone in the group needs to answer a different question: Facilitated questions:

How much of the time is Houston in daylight in the fall? How does the amount of daylight compare for spring and fall in Houston? If the Earths axis had no tilt, what would happen to the seasons? What do the seasons look like if the tilt was 90 degrees? You have 5 minutes for this task Consider having students create a 2D sketch of this after they are finished modeling. Conclusion Heating Things Up Reasons for Seasons

Daylight Hours How would you modify these activities for your classroom? What other resources do you need for these activities? Other suggestions and questions? This graph shows the average daytime temperatures in Fahrenheit. Which city has its summer in January and winter in July? 90 1. Japan 2. Australia

3. England 80 70 60 50 Japan 40 Austral ia 30 20

10 0 January April July October This graph shows the number of hours of daylight three different cities have for different times of the year. Which city has equal days and nights all year?

1. City A 2. City B 3. City C 20 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 0

City A City B City C January April July October This graph shows the number of hours of daylight three different cities have for different times of the year. Which city has the longest

nights, and in which month? 1. City A, January 2. City A, July 3. City B, October 4. City C, January 5. City C, July 20 18 16 14 12 10

8 6 4 2 0 City A City B City C January April July

October Which is true? In Texas in January, a. shadows are longer at lunchtime than in June during lunchtime. b. the weather is usually cooler or colder than in June. c. the days are longer than the nights. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Just a

Just c a and c a and b b and c All activities are online on LPIs STEP website Implementation Discussion Collaboration/Reflection How can you use any of the activities/ presentation content from today in your programs/activities? What barriers may present themselves? How can you modify activities to suit your needs? Do you have suggestions for your colleagues?

Are there ways you can partner with anyone here?

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