2009 Referee Program Directives 2009 Referee Program Directives

2009 Referee Program Directives 2009 Referee Program Directives

2009 Referee Program Directives 2009 Referee Program Directives 3 Categories 11 Directives Game Management Updates / Clarifications Technical 2009 Referee Program Directives Game Management Game Management Model Flow, Risk Taking,

& Game Control Updates/Clarifications Contact Above The Shoulder Technical Injury Management Game Disrepute Mass Confrontation Free Kick / Restart

Management Allowance For Lost Time 100% Misconduct Dissent Managing The Technical Area Tactical & Red Card Tackles

Assistant Referee Involvement Handling The Ball Game Management Model: Flow, Risk Taking and Game Control Game Management Model Objective: More game flow and less stoppages Play through: trifling, minor, soft challenges

Michel Platini, UEFA President tells BBC Sport: "Football is based on speed, pace, and rhythm. And if you interrupt the flow of the game, you kill the game's spirit." Game Management Model BIG PICTURE GAME CONTROL SAFETY ENTERTAINMENT

100% MISCONDUCT flow RISK TAKING Game Management Model BIG PICTURE If implemented correctly, the results can be positive:

GAME CONTROL SAFETY ENTERTAINMENT 100% MISCONDUCT flow RISK TAKING MLS 2008: 3.5+ less fouls per game Results in - Approx 2 minutes more time ball in play

Results in - More time for players to exhibit skills Results in - Increased entertainment value Game Management Model What is the CORE? SAFETY Safety of the players over Flow and Risk Taking ENTERTAINMENT Game flow/less stoppage increases enjoyment Think entertainment value Advantage to goal 100% MISCONDUCT

Misconduct is misconduct NO gray areas: discipline is clearly needed Mandated by the Laws of the Game SAFETY ENTERTAINMENT 100% MISCONDUCT Game Management Model What is the TRIANGLE? RISK TAKING Identify the types of small/minor challenges that the players will accept. Appropriate risks are ones that make sense given:

The location on the field The type of challenge committed The opportunity for a successful result from the application of flow The eventual impact on game control given the big picture of the match SAFETY ENTERTAINMENT 100% MISCONDUCT RISK TAKING Game Management Model

What is the TRIANGLE? FLOW The ability of a referee to manage the game so that the ball is in play by eliminating unnecessary stoppages SAFETY ENTERTAINMENT 100% MISCONDUCT flow Correctly differentiating the trifling challenges from the careless/reckless fouls,

officials can ensure more rhythm to the game. Remember this? The game is meant to be played with as little interference as possible. Constant whistling for trifling or doubtful offenses brings the game into disrepute and spoils the pleasure of the spectators. RISK TAKING Game Management Model What is the TRIANGLE? GAME CONTROL

GAME CONTROL The ability of the referee to find the right mix of risk taking and flow SAFETY ENTERTAINMENT 100% MISCONDUCT flow RISK

TAKING How you set the tone for what is acceptable in the game and what is not acceptable Presence and how the referee projects his personality on the game More game control is needed when the players actions indicate they do not want to play within the spirit of the Laws of the Game High level of game control = more risk taking and flow Low level of game control = less risk taking and flow Game Management Model

BIG PICTURE GAME CONTROL What is the BIG PICTURE? SAFETY ENTERTAINMENT 100% MISCONDUCT flow

Atmosphere and mood of the match Referees should consider asking: Does player need the card? Does the game need the card? RISK TAKING Game Management Model BIG PICTURE

BIG PICTURE GAME CONTROL SAFETY ENTERTAINMENT 100% MISCONDUCT flow 100% Misconduct Cautionable Foul or Hard Foul ? Yellow Card ?

or Red Card? There are NO gray areas RISK TAKING Game Management Model BIG PICTURE Considerations for Implementation

Recall previous action Players skill Probability of Success vs. Risk Wait and See Warning Signs Feel GAME CONTROL SAFETY ENTERTAINMENT 100% MISCONDUCT

flow Advantage signal visual/verbal message RISK TAKING Game Management Model BIG PICTURE Trifling / Minor / Soft Challenges

Player safety Not careless, reckless or excessive force GAME CONTROL SAFETY ENTERTAINMENT 100% MISCONDUCT flow Attacking player stops playing

Player has been target Feel RISK TAKING Game Management Model Proper Use of Discretion Leads To Game Flow All fouls are challenges, but All challenges are not fouls Advantage is flow, but Flow is more than advantage

Foul discrimination leads to flow Use your discretion Game Management Model BIG PICTURE Trifling / Minor / Soft Challenges Examples for Flow Upper body challenges Tugs and holds (non tactical) Incidental contact

GAME CONTROL SAFETY ENTERTAINMENT 100% MISCONDUCT flow RISK TAKING Game Management Model

BIG PICTURE WARNING SIGNS? Key indicators that the referee needs: LESS RISK TAKING LESS FLOW MORE GAME CONTROL GAME CONTROL

SAFETY ENTERTAINMENT 100% MISCONDUCT flow RISK TAKING Game Management Model BIG PICTURE

WARNING SIGNS? Foul near the team benches GAME CONTROL SAFETY ENTERTAINMENT 100% MISCONDUCT flow RISK

TAKING Wet field comfort level to make tackles increases Tackles extend from 3 yards to 7 yards Sequence / succession / repetition of challenges in a short time span (cluster fouls) Game Management Model BIG PICTURE WARNING SIGNS?

GAME CONTROL More body contact Mismatched body contact SAFETY ENTERTAINMENT 100% MISCONDUCT flow RISK

TAKING (feet versus chest, head versus knee) Change from containment defense to high pressure and chase Challenges (including 50-50) and apparent challenges on the goalkeeper Near the touchline and no way out for the ball or the player Game Management Model WARNING SIGNS?

BIG PICTURE GAME CONTROL SAFETY ENTERTAINMENT 100% MISCONDUCT Retaliation foul after play restarts flow

RISK TAKING Player into goal to retrieve ball after a score The winning team protecting the ball at the corner flag to use time Excessive fouls on the skillful player (play maker and scorer) Game Management Model WARNING SIGNS?

BIG PICTURE GAME CONTROL SAFETY ENTERTAINMENT 100% MISCONDUCT Escalation in the severity of fouls flow

Frustration level of players increasing Dissent increasing Player feedback from both teams indicating we dont want flow Score and time RISK TAKING Game Management Model Advantage GAME

CONTROL 4 P Principle SAFETY ENTERTAINMENT 100% MISCONDUCT flow Possession of Ball Potential for attack Personnel Proximity to goal

BIG PICTURE RISK TAKING Game Management Model BIG PICTURE Video Examples

GAME CONTROL SAFETY ENTERTAINMENT 100% MISCONDUCT Game Mgt Model 1 Game Mgt Model 5 Game Mgt Model 2 Game Mgt Model 6

Game Mgt Model 3 Game Mgt Model 7 Game Mgt Model 4 flow RISK TAKING 2009 Referee Program Directives Back To Home

Game Disrepute and Mass Confrontation Game Disrepute and Mass Confrontation Game Disrepute Disrespectful to the game, opponent, officials Verbal or Physical Mass Confrontation Disrespectful

to the game, opponent, officials Verbal or Physical More than 2 involved Game Disrepute and Mass Confrontation Game Disrepute: Minimum of 1 player Multiple players from both teams Dead ball situation Detract from enjoyment of the game Aggressive behavior Toward an opponent

Attempt to provoke Disrespectful manner Game Disrepute and Mass Confrontation Mass Confrontation: 3 or more players Toward official(s) Aggressive behavior Surrounding, hindering, forcing movement Try to intimidate Toward opponents by more than one player from a single team

Physical/verbal confrontation Aggressive behavior toward each other Physical contact often happens Game disrepute can quickly escalate into mass confrontation Game Disrepute and Mass Confrontation Characteristics of and Response by the Referee to Mass Confrontation Caused by a trigger issue Issue/foul that is sensitive to players Recognize the trigger issue Pregame Response

Get there to defuse Fast response Game Disrepute and Mass Confrontation Characteristics of and Response by the Referee to Mass Confrontation Separate and disperse Separate immediate players (if possible) 3 or more players Step back and observe Crew takes vantage points to observe When settles, channel opposing

players to safe zones When should AR get involved Triangle Of Control Game Disrepute and Mass Confrontation Characteristics and actions by officials: Observe and prevent others from joining in Focus on different areas Look for positive ways to prevent others from adding fuel to the fire Disperse appropriate misconduct

Get input from other officials Take immediate action if needed otherwise confer with the other officials Disperse appropriate punishment Violent conduct should be the first line of focus Game Disrepute and Mass Confrontation Warning Signs (Some Examples) Severity of foul

Player standing over another Zone of contact Comments between players Ball is often out of play or not playable Delaying a restart Distance player runs to become engaged

Body stance/aggressive display Collision with the goalkeeper Score Challenge off the ball Time Frustration levels Contact above norm Temperament of the game

Game Disrepute and Mass Confrontation How It Should Be Handled Become third man in Once becomes mass confrontation Step Back Form Triangle Act quickly Identify/observe players Defuse before it escalates

Take notes Attempt to separate Isolate players Body language and voice Referee team review if needed Quick justice Issue formal sanctions

Recognize flashpoints/warning signs Get game restarted Game Disrepute and Mass Confrontation Roles and Responsibilities of the Referee Team Entire Team Pregame Discuss Triangle Of Control Closest official becomes third man in Identify participants Pay attention to contact to the face area Post-game paperwork

The roles vary based on the position of the situation on the field and the relative position of the officials to the incident Game Disrepute and Mass Confrontation Roles and Responsibilities of the Referee Team Referee Indentify flashpoints Attempt to intervene unless mass confrontation Consult with crew (if needed) Administer misconduct Restart game as soon as possible Heightened awareness in order to be cognizant of retaliation

Game Disrepute and Mass Confrontation Roles and Responsibilities of the Referee Team Closest AR Enter field if: You can prevent the situation escalating Game disrepute turns into game misconduct (If 4th official is closer, he enters, AR assumes role of 4th and monitors technical areas) Observe if further misconduct occurs Provide information to referee Game Disrepute and Mass Confrontation Roles and Responsibilities of the Referee Team

Furthest AR Enter field if: Game disrepute turns into game misconduct Quickly form the third point in the Triangle of Control Take a very wide view Observe Provide information to referee Game Disrepute and Mass Confrontation Roles and Responsibilities of the Referee Team Fourth Official Remain in the bench area Ensure no one from technical areas

enter the field If closer than AR1 Enter the field and assume same steps as Closest AR1 (AR1 assumes fourth official responsibilities) Game Disrepute and Mass Confrontation Triangle of Control Utilize in all instances of Game Misconduct Game Disrepute and Mass Confrontation Dealing with Misconduct: Taking Official Action

Based upon the severity of the players actions, the referee should make a determination as to whether the misconduct warrants a yellow or red card. 1. Game Disrepute 2. Third Man In 3. Mass Confrontation 4. Use of Hands/Arms: Violent Conduct Game Disrepute and Mass Confrontation Dealing with Misconduct: Taking Official Action Game Disrepute Only 2 players, referee has flexibility and discretion

Instigator/Aggressor Aggressive nature of confrontation Referee encouraged to consider caution both participants KEY: The referee should ensure both players are punished uniformly Game Disrepute and Mass Confrontation Dealing with Misconduct: Taking Official Action Third Man In If causes escalation to mass confrontation Player must be cautioned Sent-Off for violent conduct

If actions warrant Game Disrepute and Mass Confrontation Dealing with Misconduct: Taking Official Action Mass Confrontation Game disrepute becomes mass confrontation Monitor for third man in Appropriate action Should situation warrant, referee should look for a 1 and 1 situation for caution (minimally 1 player from each team) KEY: The referee should ensure offenders are punished uniformly

Game Disrepute and Mass Confrontation Dealing with Misconduct: Taking Official Action Use of Hands/Arms: Violent Conduct Hands out Used to defend vs. Used to intimidate Aggressively inflame situation Referees must take appropriate action Refer to 2009 Directive on Contact Above the Shoulders Game Disrepute and Mass Confrontation Dealing with Misconduct: Taking Official Action

Use of Hands/Arms Location of contact Above the shoulder to the front of the head = Red Above the shoulder from the side to the back of the head Minimal

= Yellow Based on aggressive or violent nature and intent = Red

Game Disrepute and Mass Confrontation Video Examples Game Disrepute/ Mass Confrontation 1 Minimizing Mass Confrontation 1 Game Disrepute 1 Game Disrepute 2 2009 Referee Program Directives Back To Home

100% Misconduct: Tactical and Red Card Tackles 100% Misconduct Tactical Fouls Primarily fouls that dont necessarily endanger the safety of an opponent Committed in order to: Stop a team of an effective attack Gain an advantage in attack Tactical fouls are not only a foul but may also be considered misconduct.

100% Misconduct Tactical Fouls Characteristics Usually in attacking end of the field Attacking team has or will have a numerical advantage Time to defend Prevent the ball and/or player from advancing The defender knows he is beat Minor nature of the challenge. 100% Misconduct Tactical Fouls

Why did the player commit the foul here or at this time? Referee Team must recognize the reason Tactical Foul = Yellow 100% Misconduct Red Card Tackles

Severity of Challenges Law 12: Fouls and Misconduct No Foul Foul Careless USB VC SFP

Caution Send Off Reckless Excessive Force 100% Misconduct Careless Tackles Severity of Challenges Law 12: Fouls and Misconduct

Careless The player has shown a lack of attention or consideration when making a challenge or that he acted without precaution. Miscalculation of strength or A stretch of judgment 100% Misconduct Yellow Card Tackles Severity of Challenges Law 12: Fouls and Misconduct

Reckless The player has acted with complete disregard to the danger to, or consequences for, his opponent. Clearly outside the norm of play Yellow Card required 100% Misconduct Red Card Tackles Severity of Challenges Law 12: Fouls and Misconduct

Using Excessive Force The player has far exceeded the necessary use of force and is in danger of injuring his opponent. The opponent is in considerable danger of bodily harm Red Card required 100% Misconduct Red Card Tackles Criteria for Judgment Speed of play and the tackle Intent Aggressive nature

Position of the tackler in particular, the legs From the side, straight on, or the back Opportunity to play the ball Atmosphere of the game 100% Misconduct Video Examples 100% Misconduct Tactical 1 100% Misconduct Tactical 2 100% Misconduct

Yellow Card 1 100% Misconduct Yellow Card 2 100% Misconduct Yellow Card 3 100% Misconduct Yellow Card 4 100% Misconduct Yellow Card 5

100% Misconduct DOGSO 100% Misconduct Red Tackle 1 2009 Referee Program Directives Back To Home Assistant Referee Involvement Assistant Referee Involvement Keys to defining Involvement:

Pregame discussion Empowerment Defining when the AR has an obligation to be involved Obligation to the referee and to the game Supportive The team must adopt a get-it-right attitude Assistant Referee Involvement Ten Scenarios When Assistant Referee Involvement is Required: 1.

Game critical decisions 2. Off-the-ball incidents 3. Eye contact by the referee 4. Referee is out of position and too far from play

5. AR has better angle 6. Mass confrontation 7. Management style of the referee 8.

Temperature of the match 9. Goal line decisions 10. The whole picture not seen Assistant Referee Involvement When Assistant Referee Involvement is Required 1. Game Critical Decisions AR 100% certain regardless of referee position/attitude Decision game/referee requires vs. simple

foul in midfield like a penalty kick Misconduct - Yellow/Red Card Foul inside/outside penalty area Goal / No goal decision Team gains unfair advantage if not dealt with Trigger event Assistant Referee Involvement When Assistant Referee Involvement is Required 2. Off-the-Ball Incidents Behind the referees back vs. right in front of referee 3. Eye Contact By The Referee

What happened look vs. referee signals play on or the nothing there look Assistant Referee Involvement When Assistant Referee Involvement is Required 4. Referee Out of Position or Far From Play Closer to AR, greater likelihood for involvement Proximity to play Counter-attacks Poor positioning on a free kick 5. Referees Angle of Vision Referee does not have clear view of the action Poor angle

Interposed player(s) Assistant Referee Involvement When Assistant Referee Involvement is Required 6. Mass Confrontation Participation in Triangle of Control Provide misconduct information 7. Management Style of the Referee Adjust involvement accordingly Assistant Referee Involvement When Assistant Referee Involvement is Required 8. Temperature of the Match

Read/feel the game Increased involvement in difficult games to aid game control Assistant Referee Involvement When Assistant Referee Involvement is Required 9. Goal Line Decisions On the goal line for: Ball in/out Goal/No goal Goal kick vs. corner kick Initial indication when in ARs quadrant Assistance/confirmation when in referees quadrant ARs must sprint and follow all balls to the goal line and

maintain position with the second-to-last defender Assistant Referee Involvement When Assistant Referee Involvement is Required 10. The Whole Picture Not Seen Referee may not have seen the entire incident or total impact/severity of the action Information about actions which preceded the violation Assistant Referee Involvement Over-Involvement by the Assistant Referee ARs should refrain from:

Taking over the game Over exuberant in flagging calls that interfere with the referees performance and game flow/risk taking management Over-involvement does not extend to participation in the decisions that the AR is 100% certain and that impact the overall outcome of the game Assistant Referee Involvement Over-Involvement by the Assistant Referee Examples 1. Fouls Called Not Consistent with the Referee

2. Over-Extending Beyond the ARs Area of Control 3. 50/50 Call 4. Flag Because It Is Near Me Syndrome Assistant Referee Involvement Over-Involvement by the Assistant Referee Examples 1. Fouls Called Not Consistent with the Referee Not reading the game like the referee Violation the referee would have: Considered doubtful/trifling

Applied advantage Follow the game management style outlined by the referee in the pregame and watch as that style is implemented Neither the game nor the referee needs the call Assistant Referee Involvement Over-Involvement by the Assistant Referee Examples 2. Over-Extending Beyond the ARs Area of Control

As ARs distance to the event increases, AR involvement generally should decrease (except 100% sure and game critical) Assistant Referee Involvement Over-Involvement by the Assistant Referee Examples 3. 50/50 Call Decisions that may be too difficult for the AR to sell from his position 4. Flag Because It Is Near Me Syndrome

Flag comes up after the whistle Assistant Referee Involvement Involvement Summation If I raise the flag, do I interfere with the referee and if I dont raise the flag, do I fail the game? AR Over Involvement Assistant Referee Involvement Involvement Summation Questions for Involvement Does the referee have a clear view

of the incident? Did I clearly see the infraction? Assistant Referee Involvement Involvement Summation Overall, ARs are empowered to participate in the game if non-involvement means you: Fail the Game Fail the Referee Impact the outcome of the game In many instances, ARs should consider using the wait and see approach and refrain from quick flags. ARs should temper involvement until the game or the referee needs you.

Assistant Referee Involvement Video Examples AR Involvement 1 AR Involvement 4 AR Involvement 2 AR Involvement 5 AR Involvement 3 AR Involvement 6

2009 Referee Program Directives Back To Home CONTACT ABOVE THE SHOULDERS CONTACT ABOVE SHOULDERS Topics to be Covered Game Management Model Criteria defined No foul Foul Misconduct

Ball in play Ball out of play Tool vs. Weapon Video examples Summary REMEMBER THIS?

Italy vs. USA World Cup 2006 WHAT DOES THE PICTURE SAY? CONTACT ABOVE SHOULDERS GAME MANAGEMENT MODEL BIG PICTURE GAME CONTROL SAFETY ENTERTAINMENT

100% MISCONDUCT flow RISK TAKING CONTACT ABOVE SHOULDERS Focus Ball in play Dead ball situations Is the safety of the opponent endangered?

CONTACT ABOVE SHOULDERS No Foul Foul USB VC SFP Caution Send Off

CONTACT ABOVE SHOULDERS GENERAL CRITERIA Where a player uses his hands/arms in a manner that puts a players safety at risk. Contact above the shoulder (face, head and neck region) = Red Card Contact into Chest = Yellow Card However, if an opponent uses excessive force when pushing an opponent in his chest then a Red Card will be issued CONTACT ABOVE SHOULDERS

Why? Consideration should be given to the following factors: F I R E Frustration Intimidation Retaliation Establishing Territory CONTACT ABOVE SHOULDERS FOCUS 1. Ball in play

Aerial challenges Attacker in possession of ball swinging arm Defender using arm to stop opponent Back of head 2. Dead ball situations

To face Back of head CONTACT ABOVE SHOULDERS TOOL vs. WEAPON Consider the following tool vs. weapon comparison as contact above the shoulder occurs. Tool: Consider a foul or yellow card if contact made Weapon: A red card is mandated

CONTACT ABOVE SHOULDERS TOOL vs. WEAPON Arm used for balance Excessive force used Normal body movement

Safety of the player is endangered No swing of the arm INTO the opponent Opponent into arm/elbow/hand not arm/elbow/hand into opponent Arm/elbow was out before the challenge was initiated Not UP and IN just UP Hard surface (forearm/elbow/hand)

and neck region) Arm/elbow UP and IN to opponent leads with arm Arm/elbow/hand is swung toward opponents facial region Injury results CONTACT ABOVE SHOULDERS BALL IN PLAY CRITERIA Does the player lead with the forearm and/or is the arm extended from the jumpers body?

Up and In vs. opponent initiating contact Lead with the forearm or elbow Extended armbattering ram Tool vs. Weapon F-I-R-E EXAMPLES Player jumps INTO opponent leading with arm Player swings arm/elbow CONTACT ABOVE SHOULDERS BALL IN PLAY CRITERIA Is the safety of the opponent endangered?

Solid, hard, unforgiving contact with soft tissue Disregard to player safety Above the shoulder (facial/head/neck region) signals safety is jeopardized CONTACT ABOVE SHOULDERS BALL IN PLAY CRITERIA The result of the contact The result of the forearm and/or elbow contact, not just whether the player swung his arm/elbow to make contact (blood, broken nose, blackened eye,

injury) CONTACT ABOVE SHOULDERS BALL IN PLAY CRITERIA Do not focus solely on the swinging of the arm Referees need to modify their approach and consider the three factors above: Does the player lead with the forearm and/or is the arm

extended from the jumpers body? Is the safety of the opponent endangered? The result of the contact Think before you act Contact with a solid object (forearm or hand) with a soft object (the face) often should be interpreted as excessive force, as the amount of force necessary to injure the opponent is significantly less CONTACT ABOVE SHOULDERS No Foul Aerial

Challenges Foul USB VC SFP Caution Send Off CONTACT ABOVE SHOULDERS

NO FOUL Video Examples No Foul Aerial 1 No Foul Aerial 2 No Foul Aerial 3 No Foul Aerial 4 CONTACT ABOVE SHOULDERS No Foul

Foul Aerial Challenges USB VC SFP Caution Send Off

CONTACT ABOVE SHOULDERS FOUL: No Misconduct Careless: The player has shown a lack of attention or consideration when making a challenge or that he acted without precaution CONTACT ABOVE SHOULDERS Foul: No Misconduct Video Examples Foul Only 1 Foul Only 2

CONTACT ABOVE SHOULDERS No Foul Foul USB VC SFP Caution Send Off

Severity - Force - Result TOOL WEAPON CONTACT ABOVE SHOULDERS MISCONDUCT: YELLOW Reckless: The player has acted with complete disregard to the danger to, or

consequences for, his opponent Think: Severity Force Result More Tool than Weapon and Less Severity, Force and Result than Red Card CONTACT ABOVE SHOULDERS No Foul

Foul USB VC SFP Caution Send Off CONTACT ABOVE SHOULDERS Yellow Card: Ball In Play Video Examples Aerial Challenge

YC 1 Aerial Challenge YC 3 Aerial Challenge YC 2 Aerial Challenge YC 4 Push to Chest YC 1

Elbow Across Chest YC 1 CONTACT ABOVE SHOULDERS No Foul Foul USB VC SFP Caution

Send Off CONTACT ABOVE SHOULDERS Red Card: Ball In Play Video Examples Elbow by Attacker RC 1 Aerial Challenge RC 1 Arm to Face by Attacker RC 1

Elbow by Attacker RC 2 Aerial Challenge RC 2 Arm to Face by Defender RC 1 Elbow by Attacker RC 3 Aerial Challenge

RC 3 Arm to Face by Defender RC 2 Elbow by Attacker RC 4 Aerial Challenge RC 4 Contact with Back of Head RC

CONTACT ABOVE SHOULDERS DEAD BALL SITUATIONS FACE Deliberate Intended to intimidate Insulting Offensive

Provocative Inciting manner RED Not intended to address friendly contact that is not confrontational CONTACT ABOVE SHOULDERS DEAD BALL SITUATIONS FACE Examples: Use of the backhand Open handed slap

Push/slap to the face Jabbing of a finger(s) to the face Grabbing hair Use of a fist CONTACT ABOVE SHOULDERS DEAD BALL SITUATIONS FACE Red Cards Video Examples Push to Face RC 1 Push to Face RC 3

Push to Face RC 2 Push to Face RC 4 Head Butt RC 1 CONTACT ABOVE SHOULDERS DEAD BALL SITUATIONS FACE Red Cards NOT A RED CARD

Friendly Non confrontational Respectful between opponents Hand to Face Acceptable 1 Arm to Face Acceptable 1 CONTACT ABOVE SHOULDERS SUMMARY Tool vs. Weapon Diagram Relate to game management

Match critical issue Progression Directive 2009 Referee Program Directives Back To Home Free Kick and Restart Management Free Kick and Restart Management Two types of free kicks

Quick Ceremonial Free Kick and Restart Management Quick Free Kick Attacking team takes kick as soon as ball is properly placed No separate signal by referee needed Attacking team does not ask for minimum distance (visually or verbally) Should be the method encouraged by the referee except when specific circumstances require a Ceremonial Free Kick

Free Kick and Restart Management Ceremonial Free Kick Referee is required to enforce the distance after: Red/Yellow card On field treatment of injury Substitution Request from attacking team (visually or verbally) Game control purposes Free Kick and Restart Management Set the Tone Address early Prevent Set a standard

Hold players accountable Failure to deal with early = Difficult times later Free Kick and Restart Management Sequence of Actions to Manage Free Kicks Quick Free Kick Ceremonial Free Kick

Whistle Foul Move Toward Spot of Foul (as needed) Ensure Ball Properly Located Read Players Intent: Move to Position Appropriate for the Restart Encourage the Kick by Verbally Managing Opponents Around the Ball to Prevent Interference Team Indicates They Want Ceremonial Restart (CFK) Look for Confirmation of Ceremonial Kick (CFK)

From Attackers Get To Ball Show Wait for Whistle Signal Move the Wall Back: Get 10 yards From Players in All Directions Move to Restart Position Whistle for Restart Free Kick and Restart Management Danger Zone Free Kicks Ball at proper location Referee close but not interfering with a

quick free kick Ask/ascertain if the attacking team wants the wall moved If so, move quickly to the ball Clearly indicate wait for the whistle signal Move wall back: Get 10 yards! Whistle restart Free Kick and Restart Management The Statue The player(s) who immediately stands in front of the ball to prevent the kick from being taken thereby forcing the referee to intervene

Proactive verbally Encourage the statue to move back with you Detect trend Move to the spot of the foul quicker Presence Consider: Did the player run-in to form the statue? or Was he there immediately following the foul? Free Kick and Restart Management The Statue Presence is critical to prevent the statue from

kicking or throwing the ball away Presence = Prevention Delaying a Restart Not Respecting the Required Distance Free Kick and Restart Management How To Prevent Interference Presence Awareness of team and player tactics Communication (verbal/visual) Proactive ARs assistance

Pregame (when and how) If AR assists, wait until AR back in position to restart Free Kick and Restart Management Cautions and Retakes If a player decides to take a free kick and an opponent who is less that 10 yards from the ball intercepts it, the referee must allow play to continue. and If a player decides to take a free kick quickly and an opponent who is near the ball deliberately

prevents him from taking the kick, the referee must caution the player for delaying the restart of play. 2008/2009 FIFAs Interpretation of the Laws of the Game and Guidelines for Referees Free Kick and Restart Management Cautions and Retakes The Key Term . . . . If a player decides to take a free kick and an opponent who is less that 10 yards from the ball intercepts it, the referee must allow play to continue. and If a player decides to take a free kick quickly and

an opponent who is near the ball deliberately prevents him from taking the kick, the referee must caution the player for delaying the restart of play. Free Kick and Restart Management Cautions and Retakes Key Phrase deliberately prevents This means that the player impedes in a manner that the kicker is unable to take the free kick quickly. If the kick is taken, it has not been prevented from being taken and play must be allowed to continue.

The taking of the free kick is a decision of the attacker and, therefore, the attacker must assume responsibility for the consequences Free Kick and Restart Management Ceremonial Free Kick Player Fails To Respect Distance (10 yards) Wall set Referee whistles for kick to be taken Kick is taken Contacts the ball =

CFK: YC/Retake 1 * Retake the Kick: Caution Yellow Card Required + Retake* Free Kick and Restart Management Ceremonial Free Kick Player Fails To Respect Distance (10 yards) Wall set Referee whistles for kick to be taken Kick is taken

No Contact with the ball Referee judges encroachment did interfere No Contact with the ball Referee judges encroachment did not interfere * Retake the Kick: Caution (Caused by defending team) = = Yellow Card

Required + Retake* Continue Play Free Kick and Restart Management Ceremonial Free Kick Player Fails To Respect Distance (10 yards) Referee is setting the wall or has set the wall Player refuses to move the required distance Prior to kick being taken Referee must make every effort to intervene before the kick is taken

1st Time = 2nd Time = Warning Yellow Card Note: This does not prohibit the referee from cautioning on the first encroachment depending upon situation and the big picture of the game

Free Kick and Restart Management Ceremonial Free Kick Attacking Team Takes Kick Prior To Whistle Distance asked for and given Referee gives wait for whistle signal Attacker takes free kick prior to restart whistle Ball goes out of play directly from free kick Ball stays in play Ball goes into goal from free kick =

Retake * * If the referee believes the player intentionally played the ball prior to the whistle to cheat/deceive, then the referee may caution the player Free Kick and Restart Management Quick Free Kick Attacking Team Deliberately Kicks The Ball Into Opponent Defender does not advance/lunge directly toward the ball with the

foot/leg to prevent the kick = Continue Play Regardless of the position of the defending team, the attacking team intentionally kicks/plays the ball directly into the opponent who is less than the required minimum distance from the ball Free Kick and Restart Management Quick Free Kick Defending Team Deliberately Prevents The Free Kick From Being Taken

Defender deliberately prevents the attacking team from putting the ball into play = QFK: YC 1 Did the defender move directly/lunge toward the ball to prevent? Did the attacker know the location of the defender? Referee should attempt to prevent

Intercepts after the kick is taken Did the attacker have the opportunity to play the ball? Did the attacker know the location of defender? Was the defenders leg/foot to the side not directly lunging toward the ball prior to restart? Yellow Card Required + Retake QFK: YC 2 =

Referee Discretion QFK: Ref Decides 1 Free Kick and Restart Management Quick Free Kick Delaying a Restart Defender deliberately: Kicks ball away Carries ball away Tosses ball away Withholds the ball

etc.. = Referee Discretion based on the big picture Instances of delaying the restart often result in game disrepute and mass confrontation as they provoke opponents and lead to physical contact. Referee should take preventative action. Free Kick and Restart Management

Video Examples Free Kick Example 1 Free Kick Example 2 Free Kick Example 3 HB_001 Free FreeKick Kick

Example Example34 2009 Referee Program Directives Back To Home Dissent Dissent Protesting an Officials Decision Referee, Assistant Referee, Fourth Official Verbal Visual

Dissent Why it must be dealt with Erodes the authority of the referee Reduces the flow of the game Reduces the enjoyment of other participants and spectators Can spread if left unchecked Dissent Referees to use criteria to determine if actions are: Emotional Outburst Dissent

Offensive, insulting or abusive language/gesture Dissent Is it ? Public Personal Provocative Dissent YC 1 Dissent Forms of Dissent Examples

Actions (verbal and visual) that bring the game into disrepute Actions which convey aggressiveness to an official Mass confrontation around official

Words, tone, body language, facial expressions which demonstrate a negative, condescending attitude toward an official Dissent Forms of Dissent Examples Extended nature and persistence of players action Waving hands, kicking ball away, charging toward an official, player restrained by other

players Strong, excessive loud comments Gestures directed toward official that show disgust or disrespect Dissent Ask yourself: Is this a quick emotional outburst or dissent? If it is an outburst, consider alternative methods of addressing the behavior. If it is dissent, then the referee must caution the player. Dissent

2009 Instructions to Referees Common Sense Approach Caution or other method The referees response to dissent must be consistent with the potential impact of the dissent Early Recognition, Action and Messages Dissent 2009 Instructions to Referees Stop Sign Visual warning signal

Further dissent may be cautioned Line drawn in the sand Can be used by all officials Designated Player (for use in MLS) Team spokesperson Opportunity to address the referee Responsible and professional All others must remain at a distance Use to defuse situations Dissent 2009 Instructions to Referees Offensive, insulting or abusive

language and/or gestures Red card MUST be issued if it exceeds the boundaries of the Personal, Public and Provocative standards Physical Contact With Officials Deliberate contact to dispute a decision MUST be red carded for violent conduct Offensive/Abusive Language 1 Dissent +

Physical Contact 2009 Referee Program Directives Back To Home Handling the Ball Handling the Ball Criteria To Evaluate 1. Hand / arm to ball 2. Reaction time 3. Making yourself bigger 4. Is the arm or hand in an unnatural position?

5. Did the player benefit? Handling the Ball Hand/Arm To Ball Initiates contact Readjust body to block ball causing the ball to play his hand/arm Handling the Ball Reaction Time Did the player have time to react? The less time a defender has to react, the less likely there has been a handling

offense Distance plays a factor Handling the Ball Making Yourself Bigger Takes away space and passing lanes? Uses the hand/arm as a barrier? Uses the hand/arm to occupy more space by extending his reach? Think: Making the Body Bigger Handling the Ball Making Yourself Bigger Examples

Handball Bigger 1 Handball Bigger 2 Handball Bigger 3 Think: Making the Body Bigger Handling the Ball Unnatural Position? Is arm or hand in a position that is not

normal or natural for a player performing the task at hand? Handling the Ball Unnatural Position? Examples Handball Unnatural Position 1 Handball Unnatural Position 2 Handball Unnatural Position 3

Handling the Ball The Player Benefits Result of players action Defender Attacker Handling the Ball Summary The 5 Criteria 1. Hand / arm to ball 2. Reaction Time 3. Making yourself bigger 4. Is the arm or hand in an unnatural

position? 5. Did the player benefit? 2009 Referee Program Directives Back To Home Injury Management Injury Management Indentifying Seriously Injured Players Law 5, the Referee: Stops the match, if in his opinion, a player is seriously injured and

ensures that he is removed from the field of play. An injured player may only return to the field of play after the match has restarted. Injury Management Multiple factors: The location of the injury Head, neck, facial region should be considered serious in nature Lower extremities are often less serious (cramps are generally not serious) Age of players Immediate reaction of the player

Only when the referee has determined that the player is seriously injured, should the referee stop play regardless of whether the ball is in play or not Injury Management Procedure For Dealing With Injured Players 1. Referee makes assessment 2. Only stops play for serious injury 3. Referee questions injured player(s) at stoppage Does the player require medical attention? 4. Referee signals for medical personnel to enter field (no more than two)

Injury Management Procedure For Dealing With Injured Players 5. Stretcher enters the field Concurrent with entry of medical staff 6. Medical staff assess injury and arranges for safe and swift removal of player 7. No treatment on the field Unless serious injury (e.g.: head/neck, broken leg) Once medical staff are beckoned/authorized onto the field, the player must leave the field Injury Management

Returning To The Field 1. Once play has restarted a) Ball in play Touchline b) Ball out of play Any boundary line 2. Signal from the referee 3. AR and 4th may verify readiness of the player to reenter the field a) Ensures injured player meets requirements of Law b) AR/4th signals referee player is ready referee authorizes reentry Injury Management Team Responsibility

Each team determines whether to continue play Team with injured player Continues to play: they assume responsibility if they lose the ball Opposing team injured player Not required to play ball out Fair Play Injury Management Referee Stops Play (Ball Is In Play) Restart

Dropped Ball Location: According to Law Teams encouraged to utilize Fair Play when returning the ball Referee not responsible nor legislates manner in which ball returns into play Injury Management Goalkeeper Injury Exceptions: Only the goalkeeper injured Treatment permitted on field Not required to leave the field

Goalkeeper and field player(s) If the goalkeeper is treated, then no player is required to leave Injury Management Video Examples Allow Play To Continue Stop Play Non-Serious Injury 1 Serious

Injury 3 Non-Serious Injury 2 2009 Referee Program Directives Back To Home Allowance For Time Lost Allowance For Time Lost Only When Delays are Excessive Substitutions

No Specified Time Assessment of Injury By Medical Staff Transportation of an injured player Time Wasting Any other cause (Law 7) Excessive goal celebration Invasion of the field Specific Amount Added Discretion of the Referee

Allowance For Time Lost Time Wasting Recommended Action Early stages of delay = Excessive delay = Blatant and obvious delay

= Specific Amount Added Discretion of the Referee Warning (Verbal or visual) Discretionary Warning or Yellow Card Yellow Card

Allowance For Time Lost Communicating The Amount of Time Remember, the amount of time displayed is the MINIMUM amount If the referee indicates 2 minutes of additional time, then 2 minutes must be played Additional time may be added extending the time beyond 2 minutes based upon occurrences on the field All reasonable efforts should be used to communicate to the coaches if a significant amount of additional time will be played over that originally indicated 2009 Referee Program Directives Back To Home

Managing The Technical Area Managing The Technical Area Important to overall presentation of the game Emphasized over the past few seasons Must get better Managing The Technical Area Failure to conduct themselves in a responsible manner Coaches Team personnel

Substitutes Substituted players Ask, Tell, Remove Managing The Technical Area Failure to conduct themselves in a responsible manner Kicking/hitting the benches, signboards or other items Leaving the technical area without permission Throwing/kicking items on the field Using abusive, insulting or offensive language or gestures Inflammatory and/or aggressive behavior

Interfering with the AR or 4th official in performance of their duties Managing The Technical Area Techniques - Referee Pre-game Listen / heightened awareness Eye Contact Body and hand motions Proximity - Presence lends conviction Acknowledge the coach Flyby Take ownership Empower the Fourth Official and

Assistant Referee Managing The Technical Area Techniques Assistant Referee Maintain concentration Communicate with bench personnel Communicate with fourth official Support fourth official Feel the point of no return Acknowledgement Managing The Technical Area Techniques Fourth Official Introduce yourself, before the game

Space for coach to vent Sounding board without coach crossing the line Find Peacemaker on the bench Positive presence Equal time Develop a plan Confirm with AR1 Ask, Tell, Remove Managing The Technical Area Ask, Tell, Remove ASK

Request to stop TELL Insist to stop REMOVE Dismissal required Steps not necessary if the behavior and conduct of personnel within the technical area requires immediate dismissal

Managing The Technical Area What You Can Say I hear you or I understand you, coach Coach, talk to me Coach, I will listen to you but not the rest of the bench I will pass along the message I will talk to the ref/AR We will talk about it at half time Talk to me rather than shouting I know how important this game is to you, it is just as important to us Coach, I understand you are upset but you need to calm down I can see you dont agree with the call, but PLEASE settle down Please stop being so visual. Talk to me but dont wave your hands

The refs got it, give him a chance Managing The Technical Area What You Can Say (continued . . . ) Where are you going? Dont do it The ref was there This is a game of angles; we have a different angle than the referee If I have to call the referee over, you will be dismissed

Coach, please talk to your assistant, he is getting close to my having to take official action Remind the coach of proper bench decorum Managing The Technical Area What You Cant Say Avoid open ended phrases that conjure up debate or add fuel to the fire Curse, use abusive or insulting language Criticize the members of the referee team Attack or criticize the coach or his team Say what you would have done in that situation Make physical contact with bench personnel

Issue threats unless you are ready to enter the Remove phase Use phrases that invite further debate or negative discussion Managing The Technical Area Reasons We Dont Take Action Feel assignments will be impacted negatively They will not be Want to be friends with bench personnel Lack of confidence to deal with any altercation Dont want confrontation Intimidated by coaches Want to be friends with bench personnel Will see the coach again

The referee may have made a bad decision Other officials dont want to negatively impact the referees game Managing The Technical Area Actions That Cross The Line Leaving technical area to dispute/dissent a call Throwing/kicking anything while disputing a call Kicking/hitting advertising boards or bench in dispute of a call Directed abusive, insulting or offensive language and/or gestures Inflammatory and/or aggressive behavior with the opposition Interfering with the restart of play and field players Making unwanted and/or aggressive contact with opposing players

Interfering with the AR or fourth official in the performance of their duties Managing The Technical Area 2009 Instructions to Referees Preventative Escalation Measure Fourth Official determines that the TELL step did not work Ready to escalate to REMOVE Fourth official shall notify the referee At a stoppage, the referee shall approach the technical area and warn the coach Any further irresponsible behavior means immediate dismissal

Pregame: Referee team to establish an escalation procedure to cover: Process for fourth official to notify referee Process of referee notifying the coach Managing The Technical Area Video Examples Managing Technical Area 1 Managing Technical Area 3 Managing Technical Area 2

Managing Technical Area 4 2009 Referee Program Directives Back To Home Week In Review www.ussoccer.com Text http://www.ussoccer.com/referees/index.jsp.html Podcast http://www.ussoccer.com/sights/audio/index.jsp.html

Documents 2009 Referee Program Directives Game Management Game Management Model Flow, Risk Taking & Game Control Game Disrepute and Mass Confrontation 100% Misconduct: Tactical and Red Card Tackles Assistant Referee Involvement Updates / Clarifications Contact Above The Shoulder Free Kick and Restart Management Dissent Handling the Ball

Technical Injury Management Managing the Technical Area 2009 Referee Program Directives

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