Growing Older 1 Kings 11and 14 The Fallin

Growing Older 1 Kings 11and  14 The Fallin

Growing Older 1 Kings 11and 14 The Fallin of the King Wiser Solomon & Faith the Reign of King Jeroboam Remaining Class Schedule Main Scripture Temptation of Date Text Focus Older Saints 29 April 1 Kings 11:29-43 Morbidity

6 May1 Kings 12:1-24 Feeling Abandoned 13 May 1 Kings 12:25 - 13:10 Bitterness 20 May 1 Kings 13:11-34 Despair & Doubt 27 May 1 Kings 14:1-20 Losing Faith The Last Word An epitaph is the last word on a person's life Written on a tombstone or other monument, the meaning of someone's existence is captured in one short sentence or a few lines of poetic verse Some epitaphs remind us of our own mortality, like the famous Latin inscription that reads: Hodie mihi, cras tibi Any Latin scholars here "Today for me, tomorrow for

today? thee" Kohima Monument (Nagaland, India) Other epitaphs remind us of the debt that we owe to soldiers who died fighting for our freedom, like the inscription from John Maxwell Edmonds that appears on the World War II Kohima Monument: "When you go home Tell them of us and say For your tomorrow We gave our today" Christian Epitaphs Then there are the

epitaphs that testify to the saving, sanctifying grace of Jesus Christ David Livingstone was a pioneer missionary to inland Africa His tomb in London's Westminster Abbey reads, "For thirty years his life was spent in an Christian Epitaphs Ruth Bell Graham's epitaph says less about her work, and more about the help of the Holy Spirit She borrowed it from a highway road sign: "End of Construction: Thank You for Your

Patience Tombstones One day death will come for each of us, as it comes for everyone If death does not come today, it will come on some tomorrow When it comes, what will people write on your tombstone? What will they say when your time on earth is done? Based on what we know about the life of Solomon, what epitaph should we The Last Word on Solomon There are many good lines to choose from his own writings

If we consider the way he began, by asking God for the wisdom to rule over Israel, we might choose Proverbs 1:7: "The fear of the LORD is the beginning of knowledge If we look at the way the king lived, especially in his later days, we might choose Ecclesiastes 5:18 instead: "Eat and drink and find enjoyment ... under the sun But Solomon learned how empty it is to live without God, so maybe we should choose Ecclesiastes 1:12 instead: "Vanity of The Last Word on Solomon However, if we are hopeful about Solomon's salvation, as I believe we could be, then we could draw an epitaph from the love song he wrote for his Savior in Song of Songs 2:4:"He brought me to the banqueting house, and His Back soon

See you on banner over me was love Sunday Whatever epitaph we write for Solomon, the fact that he needs an epitaph at all is a reminder of his limitations Praise God that we know the greater Solomon of a greater kingdom, who still has grace for us we know Jesus Christ the King without an epitaph for His tombstone Growing Older 1 Kings 11and 14 The Fallin of the King

Wiser Solomon & Faith the Reign of King Jeroboam Week #9 1 Kings 11:26-4 1 Kings 11:26-28 Jeroboam the son of Nebat, an Ephraimite of Zeredah, a servant of Solomon, whose mother's name was Zeruah, a widow, also lifted up his hand against the king. 27And this was the reason why he lifted up his hand against the king. Solomon built the Millo, and closed up the breach of the city of David his father. 28The man Jeroboam was very able, and when Solomon saw that the young man was industrious he gave him charge over all the forced labor of the house of Joseph. 26 Re

zo n The disintegration of Solomons empire came at the hands of his enemies adversaries directly raised by God Himself Hadad attacked from Edom in the south Rezon raided Israel from the north Where does Jeroboams attack come from? d a H From inside Solomons own

kingdom d a 1 Kings 11:26-28 Jeroboam the son of Nebat, an Ephraimite of Zeredah, a servant of Solomon, whose mother's name was Zeruah, a widow, also lifted up his hand against the king. 27And this was the reason why he lifted up his hand against the king. Solomon built the Millo, and closed up the breach of the city of David his father. 28The man Jeroboam was very able, and when Solomon saw that the young man was industrious he gave him charge over all the forced labor of the house of Joseph. 26 Where is Jeroboam from? Is this significant?

An Ephraimite of Zeredah ? "Ephraimite" is used in reference to members of the tribe of Ephraim (see Judges 12:5) Zeredah is used to further clarify Jeroboam's northern status (see 2 Chronicles 4:17 as a reference to the northern locale of this city) Jeroboam of Ephraim is a member of one of the northern tribes while serving King Solomon who was a southern sympathizer 1 Kings 11:26-28

Jeroboam the son of Nebat, an Ephraimite of Zeredah, a servant of Solomon, whose mother's name was Zeruah, a widow, also lifted up his hand against the king. 27And this was the reason why he lifted up his hand against the king. Solomon built the Millo, and closed up the breach of the city of David his father. 28The man Jeroboam was very able, and when Solomon saw that the young man was industrious he gave him charge over all the forced labor of the house of Joseph. 26 What does it mean to say that Jeroboam lifted up his hand against the king? This is another way of saying that Jeroboam rebelled against the kings rule

Lifted Up His Hand How exactly does Jeroboam rebel (literally "lift his hand") against the king? The most recent character to lift a hand against the king is Sheba son of Bieri in 2 Samuel 20, who ends up losing his head in memorable fashion Is Jeroboam a rebel like Sheba or a servant who participates in a rather different kind of rebellion against his superior? Biblical commentators offer a dizzying array of hypotheses on the meaning of the phrase with one theory rebelling against the other Instead, The difficulty,

ofwe course, is that is nothe what are given quantifiable rebellion is described circumstances of Jeroboam's 1 Kings 11:26-28 Jeroboam the son of Nebat, an Ephraimite of Zeredah, a servant of Solomon, whose mother's name was Zeruah, a widow, also lifted up his hand against the king. 27And this was the reason why he lifted up his hand against the king. Solomon built the Millo, and closed up the breach of the city of David his father. 28The man Jeroboam was very able, and when Solomon saw that the young man was industrious he gave him charge over all the forced labor of the house of Joseph. 26

According to the ESV text, what appears to be the reason why [Jeroboam] lifted up his hand against the Based on a cursory reading of the text, the implication is that Jeroboam rebels against King Solomon 1 Kings 11:26-28 Jeroboam the son of Nebat, an Ephraimite of Zeredah, a servant of Solomon, whose mother's name was Zeruah, a widow, also lifted up his hand against the king. 27And this was the reason why he lifted up his hand against the king. Solomon built the Millo, and closed up the breach of the city of David his father. 28The man Jeroboam was very able, and when Solomon

saw that the young man was industrious he gave him charge over all the forced labor of the house of Joseph. 26 Lets take a quick look at what the Millo construction project was all The Millo The Millo is part of the City of David It is usually understood as some sort of defense structure in the city of Jerusalem, and this project is where Jeroboam is employed The Millo consists of the terraces and retaining walls on

the eastern slope of the wall surrounding Jerusalem The most common assumption among archaeologis ts and historians of ancient Israel is that the Millo is the Stepped Stone Structure uncovered Stepped-Stone Structure 1000 BC

Stepped-Stone Structure The etymology of the Hebrew word millo may be derived from the verb ml, to fill up The Stepped Stone Structure is built of a fill of stones The Millo: Biblical Background

It is during the repairs to the breach and the building of the Millo that Jeroboam attracts Solomon's attention This is not the first time that the Millo has been mentioned in the narrative Back in 1 Kings 9:15 the Millo is referred to along with other projects that Solomon built using forced labor, and the Millo is again mentioned in 1 Kings 9:24 Based on these references, biblical scholars calculate that the project was undertaken in Solomon's twenty-fourth year The Millo: Biblical Background The significance of such a statistic, to my mind, reveals another sign of Gods patience and

long-suffering with Solomons sins If the Millo project was not started until the 24 th year of Solomon reign, that would mean Jeroboam's rise to prominence begins after the two direct divine warnings to the king in 1 Kings 6:11-13 and 9:3-9 Therefore, Jeroboam is further revealed to be an instrument of justice after Solomon has been given ample latitude to reform 1 Kings 11:26-28 Jeroboam the son of Nebat, an Ephraimite of Zeredah, a servant of Solomon, whose mother's name was Zeruah, a widow, also lifted up his hand against the king. 27And this was the reason why he lifted up his hand against the king. Solomon built the Millo, and closed up the breach of the city of David his father. 28The man Jeroboam was very able, and when Solomon

saw that the young man was industrious he gave him charge over all the forced labor of the house of Joseph. 26 So what about Solomon building the Millo would cause Jeroboam to lift up his hand against the king? Rebel With A Cause? Some commentators insist that the cause of the division of the kingdom can be attributed to Solomon's inequitable forced labor practices (a point we will address in 1 Kings 12:4) They then assume that Jeroboam led a protest by the forced laborers Jeroboam may have used

his position to sidetrack some of Solomons taskmaster (Adoniram) harsher commands Jeroboam: Social Justice Warrior? Solomon, removed from the man in the street in his palace, was insulated from the plight of the masses But not Jeroboam; working with the common people on the construction projects in Jerusalem and as an overseer of the labor force from the House of Joseph, he had a chance to learn firsthand about the bitterness of the oppressed citizens Jeroboam sympathized with the bitterness of those with whom he worked as they chafed

Another Possibility Verse 27a (this is the reason why he lifted up his hand) contains an important wordplay that escapes translation The Hebrew word translated as reason by the ESV is dabar The Hebrew dabar can mean a story or an affair, which is the sense in which the ESV takes it, "This is the reason (or affair) that But dabar can be caused him to

rebel understood equally well in another way as either "word" or 1 Kings 11:26-28 Jeroboam the son of Nebat, an Ephraimite of Zeredah, a servant of Solomon, whose mother's name was Zeruah, a widow, also lifted up his hand against the king. 27And this was the reason why he lifted up his hand against the king. Solomon built the Millo, and closed up the breach of the city of David his father. 28The man Jeroboam was very able, and when Solomon saw that the young man was industrious he gave him charge over all the forced labor of the house of Joseph. 26 If dabar was translated as word or speech instead of

reason in verse 27, what would be the meaning/implication? And this was the word why Another Possibility Understood this way, the dabar in question is, then literally a divine "word," the prophetic oracle Ahijah delivers in the following verses (vv. 31-39) And it is this word itself that causes rebellion ("raises a hand") against the king Causation is to be sought in God's historical will & the communication of the will through the prophetic word As God raises up the two foreign adversaries Hadad and Rezon, so God raises up Jeroboam's hand by means of

the prophetic word as we will examine 1 Kings 11:26-28 Jeroboam the son of Nebat, an Ephraimite of Zeredah, a servant of Solomon, whose mother's name was Zeruah, a widow, also lifted up his hand against the king. 27And this was the reason why he lifted up his hand against the king. Solomon built the Millo, and closed up the breach of the city of David his father. 28The man Jeroboam was very able, and when Solomon saw that the young man was industrious he gave him charge over all the forced labor of the house of Joseph. He is dubbed a gibbor How does hayil in verse 28 verse 28 (traditionally translated describe as a

mighty man of What do you Jeroboam? valor (KJV) think this 26 Jeroboam was very able This phrase gibbor hayil is literally a hero of strength It is used on a number of occasions as designation for characters in biblical Hebrew Other examples include : Jephthah in Judges 11:1

Boaz in Ruth 2:1 Kish (Saul's father) in 1 Samuel 9:1, and Naaman (commander of the army of the king of Syria) in 2 Kings 5:1 Based on these examples, scholars deduce that the phrase refers to either a warrior (as in the cases of Jeroboam was very able As for what the designation means in Jeroboam's case, commentators can be found on both sides Some argue that because Jeroboam's mother is a widow, Jeroboam inherits the family property, while others maintain that warrior-like qualities are stressed in 11:28 In either scenario, both meanings of the phrase "hero of strength" will be applicable to Jeroboam in the days ahead: He will be both a man of war whose troops battle against Judah's military, and A man of considerable property holdings (the

1 Kings 11:26-28 Jeroboam the son of Nebat, an Ephraimite of Zeredah, a servant of Solomon, whose mother's name was Zeruah, a widow, also lifted up his hand against the king. 27And this was the reason why he lifted up his hand against the king. Solomon built the Millo, and closed up the breach of the city of David his father. 28The man Jeroboam was very able, and when Solomon saw that the young man was industrious he gave him charge over all the forced labor of the house of Joseph. 26 What does Solomon do with this hero of strength, this very able young man? Its A Promotion! Just as Saul promotes David after benefiting from his skillful playing, so Solomon promotes Jeroboam when he sees that he is an

industrious worker Since Solomon has 700 wives and 300 concubines and presumably, therefore, not a lot of spare time on his hands catching the king's eye is no mean feat Jeroboam is promoted because he is proficient at helping 1 Kings 11:26-28 Jeroboam the son of Nebat, an Ephraimite of Zeredah, a servant of Solomon, whose mother's name was Zeruah, a widow, also lifted up his hand against the king. 27And this was the reason why he lifted up his hand against the king. Solomon built the Millo, and closed up the breach of the city of David his father. 28The man Jeroboam was very able, and when Solomon saw that the young man was industrious he gave him charge over all the forced labor of the house of Joseph. 26

Who is Jeroboam placed in charge over? What is the significance of this advancement? Jeroboams Advancement Remember that Jeroboam is from the tribe of Ephraim, one of the most important tribes of the northern kingdom Solomon put him in charge of "all the forced labor of the house of Joseph" The "house of Joseph" was the most important power bloc of the northern kingdom, comprising the tribes of Manasseh and, yes, Ephraim In other words, Jeroboam was view appointed

How might Jeroboam this to be the foreman in charge of oppressing his promotion? own people! 1 Kings 11:29-32 And at that time, when Jeroboam went out of Jerusalem, the prophet Ahijah the Shilonite found him on the road. Now Ahijah had dressed himself in a new garment, and the two of them were alone in the open country. 30Then Ahijah laid hold of the new garment that was on him, and tore it into twelve pieces. 31And he said to Jeroboam, "Take for yourself ten pieces, for thus says the Lord, the God of Israel, 'Behold, I am about to tear the kingdom from the hand of Solomon and will give you ten tribes 32(but he shall have one tribe, for the sake of my servant David and for the sake of Jerusalem, the city that I have chosen out of all the tribes of Israel) 29

1 Kings 11:33-36 33because they have forsaken me and worshiped Ashtoreth the goddess of the Sidonians, Chemosh the god of Moab, and Milcom the god of the Ammonites, and they have not walked in my ways, doing what is right in my sight and keeping my statutes and my rules, as David his father did. 34Nevertheless, I will not take the whole kingdom out of his hand, but I will make him ruler all the days of his life, for the sake of David my servant whom I chose, who kept my commandments and my statutes. 35But I will take the kingdom out of his son's hand and will give it to you, ten tribes. 36 Yet to his son I will give one tribe, that David my servant may always have a lamp before me in Jerusalem, the city where I have chosen to put my name. 1 Kings 11:37-40 And I will take you, and you shall reign over all that your soul desires, and you shall be king over Israel. 38And if you will listen to all that I command you, and will walk in my ways, and do what is

right in my eyes by keeping my statutes and my commandments, as David my servant did, I will be with you and will build you a sure house, as I built for David, and I will give Israel to you. 39And I will afflict the offspring of David because of this, but not forever. '" 40 Solomon sought therefore to kill Jeroboam. But Jeroboam arose and fled into Egypt, to Shishak king of Egypt, and was in Egypt until the death of Solomon. 37 1 Kings 11:29-32 And at that time, when Jeroboam went out of Jerusalem, the prophet Ahijah the Shilonite found him on the road. Now Ahijah had dressed himself in a new garment, and the two of them were alone in the open country. 30Then Ahijah laid hold of the new garment that was on him, and tore it into twelve pieces. 31And he said to Jeroboam, "Take for yourself ten pieces, for thus says the Lord, the God of Israel, 'Behold, I am about to tear the kingdom from the hand of Solomon and will give you ten tribes 32(but he shall have one tribe, for the sake of my servant David and for the sake of

Jerusalem, the city that I have chosen out of all the tribes of Israel) 29 Solomon is not the only person for who Jeroboam becomes an object of attention Who else singles out Jeroboam The prophet Ahijah the Shilonite 1 Kings 11:29-32 And at that time, when Jeroboam went out of Jerusalem, the prophet Ahijah the Shilonite found him on the road. Now Ahijah had dressed himself in a new garment, and the two of them were alone in the open country. 30Then Ahijah laid hold of the new garment that was on him, and tore it into twelve pieces. 31And he said to Jeroboam, "Take for yourself ten pieces, for thus says the Lord, the God of Israel, 'Behold, I am about to tear the kingdom

from the hand of Solomon and will give you ten tribes 32(but he shall have one tribe, for the sake of my servant David and for the sake of Jerusalem, the city that I have chosen out of all the tribes of Israel) At the same time when What is Jeroboam is vaulted into ironic about prominence by the king, he is the timing of also appointed to replace this event? 29 1 Kings 11:29-32 And at that time, when Jeroboam went out of Jerusalem, the There Ahijah may well be layered thisNow phrase

prophet the Shilonite foundmeanings him on theto road. Ahijah Ondressed the surface thisgarment, refers to had himselfof in it, a new andgeographical the two of them were movement alone in the open country. 30Then Ahijah laid hold of the new Jeroboam was presumably in the capital, perhaps

on 31 garment that was on him, and tore it into twelve pieces. And he official business said to Jeroboam, "Take for yourself

ten pieces, for thusperhaps says the And now he is on his way somewhere else, Lord, the to God of Israel, 'Behold, I amgangs about to tear the kingdom back supervise the labor 32 from hand of

and will give youthe ten tribes (butofhehis shall Butthe in view ofSolomon the disaffection that mention rebellion reveals, in my view of the seditious nature of have

one tribe, for the and sake of servant David and for the sake of the oracle Ahijah is chosen about out to pronounce, when Jerusalem, thethat city that I have of all the tribes of Israel) 29

Jeroboam went out of Jerusalem" can also imply an intention Why it is fitting that a destiny) to break He is departing (or at least away from Jeroboam'sservice appointment as from Solomon's Solomon's the principal inheritor of capital and will Solomon's kingdom takes not return to 1 Kings 11:29-32 And at that time, when Jeroboam went out of Jerusalem, the prophet Ahijah the Shilonite found him on the road. Now Ahijah

had dressed himself in a new garment, and the two of them were alone in the open country. 30Then Ahijah laid hold of the new garment that was on him, and tore it into twelve pieces. 31And he said to Jeroboam, "Take for yourself ten pieces, for thus says the Lord, the God of Israel, 'Behold, I am about to tear the kingdom from the hand of Solomon and will give you ten tribes 32(but he shall have one tribe, for the sake of my servant David and for the sake of Jerusalem, the city that I have chosen out of all the tribes of Israel) 29 What is the meaning behind Ahijah tearing his coat? The torn cloak was a sign of God's judgment: Solomon's kingdom would be

1 Kings 11:29-32 And at that time, when Jeroboam went out of Jerusalem, the prophet Ahijah the Shilonite found him on the road. Now Ahijah had dressed himself in a new garment, and the two of them were alone in the open country. 30Then Ahijah laid hold of the new garment that was on him, and tore it into twelve pieces. 31And he said to Jeroboam, "Take for yourself ten pieces, for thus says the Lord, the God of Israel, 'Behold, I am about to tear the kingdom from the hand of Solomon and will give you ten tribes 32(but he shall have one tribe, for the sake of my servant David and for the sake of Jerusalem, the city that I have chosen out of all the tribes of Israel) 29 The Hebrew word for "cloak" (salma) is based on the same three consonants as the name Solomon (shlomoh) It is almost as if the king himself

would be divided 1 Kings 11:29-32 And at that time, when Jeroboam went out of Jerusalem, the prophet Ahijah the Shilonite found him on the road. Now Ahijah had dressed himself in a new garment, and the two of them were alone in the open country. 30Then Ahijah laid hold of the new garment that was on him, and tore it into twelve pieces. 31And he said to Jeroboam, "Take for yourself ten pieces, for thus says the Lord, the God of Israel, 'Behold, I am about to tear the kingdom from the hand of Solomon and will give you ten tribes 32(but he shall have one tribe, for the sake of my servant David and for the sake of Jerusalem, the city that I have chosen out of all the tribes of Israel) 29 What is so monumental about the event Ahijah foretells?

Up to this point, the twelve tribes of Israel had always been united even when they were slaves in Egypt But from this point forward, 1 Kings 11:29-32 And at that time, when Jeroboam went out of Jerusalem, the prophet Ahijah the Shilonite found himlooking on the road. Now However, ahead in Ahijah the text, had dressed himself in a new garment, and the two

of them were there is one tribe whose loyalties 30 divided alone in the open country. are Then Ahijah laid hold of the new originally a northern 31 garment that was on him, Benjamin, and tore it into

twelve pieces. And he tribe, is so immediately adjacent to said to Jeroboam, "Take forJerusalem yourself tenthat pieces, for thus says thenot Rehoboam dare Lord, the God of Israel, 'Behold, to tear the kingdom leaveI am its about territory under northern

from the hand of Solomoncontrol and will give you ten tribes 32(but he shall He incorporates Benjamin or at have one tribe, for the sake of myas servant for the sake of least muchDavid of itsand territory as he Jerusalem, the city that I have of ten all the of tribes Israel) out can chosen

manage to seize tribes under The northern 29 Judahite sovereignty (see 1 Kings are for Jeroboam and 12:21) Jeroboam is to get ten Judah is set aside for the Davidic house tribes, with one tribe The simplest reserved for Solomon

explanation is that the What happens to the 1 Kings 11:33-36 33because they have forsaken me and worshiped Ashtoreth the goddess of the Sidonians, Chemosh the god of Moab, and Milcom the god of the Ammonites, and they have not walked in my ways, doing what is right in my sight and keeping my statutes and my rules, as David his father did. 34Nevertheless, I will not take the whole kingdom out of his hand, but I will make him ruler all the days of his life, for the sake of David my servant whom I chose, who kept my commandments and my statutes. 35But I will take the kingdom out of his son's hand and will give it to you, ten tribes. 36 Yet to his son I will give one tribe, that David my servant may always have a lamp before me in Jerusalem, the city where I have chosen to put my name. It signifies What might the

widespread corruption as switch in pronouns though the king led from he (v. 32) to 1 Kings 11:33-36 33because they have forsaken me and worshiped Ashtoreth the goddess of the Sidonians, Chemosh the god of Moab, and Milcom the god of the Ammonites, and they have not walked in my ways, doing what is right in my sight and keeping my statutes and my rules, as David his father did. 34Nevertheless, I will not take the whole kingdom out of his hand, but I will make him ruler all the days of his life, for the sake of David my servant whom I chose, who kept my commandments and my statutes. 35But I will take the kingdom out of his son's hand and will give it to you, ten tribes. 36 Yet to his son I will give one tribe, that David my servant may always have a lamp before me in Jerusalem, the city where I have

chosen to put my name. That kings Much of this first part of Ahijah's oracle is negative and focuses on the reasons for Solomon's rejection who disobey can be dislodged 1 Kings 11:37-40 And I will take you, and you shall reign over all that your soul desires, and you shall be king over Israel. 38And if you will listen to all that I command you, and will walk in my ways, and do what is right in my eyes by keeping my statutes and my commandments, as David my servant did, I will be with you and will build you a sure house, as I built for David, and I will give Israel to you. 39And I will afflict the offspring of David because of this, but not forever. '"

40 Solomon sought therefore to kill Jeroboam. But Jeroboam arose and fled into Egypt, to Shishak king of Egypt, and was in Egypt until the death of Solomon. At Solomon's expense, 37 What staggering promise is given here in the second part of the oracle? Jeroboam is assured an enduring dynasty if he does "what is right He is offered the chance to become a new David and sire a 1 Kings 11:37-40 And I will take you, and you shall reign over all that your soul

desires, and you shall be king over Israel. 38And if you will listen to all that I command you, and will walk in my ways, and do what is right in my eyes by keeping my statutes and my commandments, as David my servant did, I will be with you and will build you a sure house, as I built for David, and I will give Israel to you. 39And I will afflict the offspring of David because of this, but not forever. '" 40 Solomon sought therefore to kill Jeroboam. But Jeroboam arose and fled into Egypt, to Shishak king of Egypt, and was in Egypt until the death of Solomon. Why is this promise so 37 Jeroboam was notsurprising? the legitimate heir to Israel's throne He did not belong to the house and line of David 1 Kings 11:37-40

And I will take you, and you shall reign over all that your soul desires, and you shall be king over Israel. 38And if you will listen to all that I command you, and will walk in my ways, and do what is right in my eyes by keeping my statutes and my commandments, as David my servant did, I will be with you and will build you a sure house, as I built for David, and I will give Israel to you. 39And I will afflict the offspring of David because of this, but not forever. '" 40 Solomon sought therefore to kill Jeroboam. But Jeroboam arose and fled into Egypt, to Shishak king of Egypt, and was in Egypt until the death of Solomon. He did everything he could 37 What does Solomon do when he hears about Ahijahs to stop it from ever coming

true Just as Saul had once tried to kill David, Solomon tried to assassinate Jeroboam, 1 Kings 11:37-40 And I will take you, and you shall reign over all that your soul desires, and you shall be king over Israel. 38And if you will listen to all that I command you, and will walk in my ways, and do what is right in my eyes by keeping my statutes and my commandments, as David my servant did, I will be with you and will build you a sure house, as I built for David, and I will give Israel to you. 39And I will afflict the offspring of David because of this, but not forever. '" 40 Solomon sought therefore to kill Jeroboam. But Jeroboam arose and fled into Egypt, to Shishak king of Egypt, and was in Egypt until the death of Solomon. 37 What does

Jeroboam do in response to Solomons He flees to the king of Egypt and stays there until Solomons death Jeroboam's flight toand Egypt But Jeroboam arose fled reminds of theking refuge into Egypt, us to Shishak

of Hadad of Edom had found Egypt, and was in Egypt until the there a generation earlier death of Solomon. (11:18-20) The irony is strong Early in the Solomon story we learned of a great political coup: Solomon became Pharaoh's son-in-law (3:1) Frequent mentions of his marriage to Pharaoh's daughter (7:8; 9:16; 9:24; 11:1) kept before our eyes the presumably harmonious

relations that continued between Egypt and Israel Since the reader will later learn that Shishak invades Jeroboam Israel (see 1Flees Kings 14:25), to Egypt one suspects that the king of Egypt is politically motivated to protect Jeroboam from Solomon Jeroboam = David Lets take a look at all the parallels weve seen in these passages between King David and Jeroboam

1. Like David, Jeroboam is a valiant warrior and a potentially royal figure 2. Jeroboam faithfully serves Solomon, a rising star of the royal administration The original pattern for this scenario comes from the story of Joseph, but this is refracted through the story of David, who faithfully serves Saul 3. Jeroboam meets a prophet from Shiloh, who Jeroboam = David Lets take a look at all the parallels weve seen in these passages between King David and Jeroboam 4. Ahijah symbolizes the tearing of the kingdom by tearing a "new cloak' that he wears Similarly, the kingdom taken from Saul is symbolized by the torn robe of Saul

5. Once Solomon finds that Jeroboam has been designated as his successor, he attempts to kill him, just as Saul attempts several times to kill the anointed prince, David 1 Kings 11:41-43 Now the rest of the acts of Solomon, and all that he did, and his wisdom, are they not written in the Book of the Acts of Solomon? 42And the time that Solomon reigned in Jerusalem over all Israel was forty years. 43And Solomon slept with his fathers and was buried in the city of David his father. And Rehoboam his son reigned in his place. 41 The account of Solomon ends with the first instance of a standard pattern for recording the death of a monarch and succession The Book of the Acts of Solomon was

evidently a unique source separate from the Book of the Chronicles of the Kings 1 Kings 11:41-43 Now the rest of the acts of Solomon, and all that he did, and his wisdom, are they not written in the Book of the Acts of Solomon? 42And the time that Solomon reigned in Jerusalem over all Israel was forty years. 43And Solomon slept with his fathers and was buried in the city of David his father. And Rehoboam his son reigned in his place. 41 How long did King Solomon reign? He reigned 40 years If he was 25 when he assumed the throne as most biblical

scholars attest, then he was 65 years old 1 Kings 11:41-43 Now the rest of the acts of Solomon, and all that he did, and his wisdom, are they not written in the Book of the Acts of Solomon? 42And the time that Solomon reigned in Jerusalem over all Israel was forty years. 43And Solomon slept with his fathers and was buried in the city of David his father. And Rehoboam his son reigned in his place. 41 Verse 43 marks the end of King Solomons remarkable reign Never again would it be said of a king in his obituary that he reigned over all Israel Lets take a look at how things How Things Went For Gods

People Under Solomons Reign What Should We Say at Solomon's Funeral? He definitely had positive traits, namely wisdom and eloquence He used his wisdom to write, organize, develop efficient foreign policy, build the temple, grow the economy, trade and build great fortresses He also offered a magnificent prayer to God at the dedication of the Temple of God We should remember these positive traits about Solomon What Should We Say at Solomon's Funeral? Unfortunately we must also note his flaws: He broke clear commands like taking

many foreign wives He used oppressive measures to gain wealth And worst of all, he enabled and committed gross idolatry, which led to national disaster This wise leader of Israel acted no better than the most foolish of his subjects What Should We Say at Solomon's Funeral? Perhaps you have gained it all wealth, power, sexual pleasure, a big home but you don't have Christ Jesus asks this question: For what does it benefit a man to gain the whole world yet lose his life?" (Mark 8:36) Eternal life is in the balance! We can die well because our King finished

well For Davids sake, God remained faithful to His people (2 Sam 7:14-15) What Should We Say at Solomon's Funeral? He doesn't wipe out Israel, though they will face dreadful consequences Eventually the One greater than Solomon did come This King wouldn't turn away from God's Law, but would keep it perfectly and then die on behalf of idolaters This King would also go to a grave, but he would only sleep with His fathers for three days He is the perfect Mediator, the ultimate Protector and Provider, the perfectly

Temptations We Face as Older Believers Selfishness Feeling Worthless Stinginess Giving Up Morbidi Morbidity ty Feeling Abandoned Bitterness Despair Doubt Losing Faith Morbidity Younger people dont think much about death

Even when they do, it is usually about the death of others However, older people face death frequently Somewhere in their 50s most people begin to actually read obituaries in the newspaper (or their digital equivalents) and notice the age of the newly dead During their 50s and 60s they watch the Morbidity They eventually see a person in the obituary younger than them Checking ages of the dead can become a morbid habit and they begin counting down Eventually half of those dead are younger And finally they come upon the

day when they see that all of the obituary notices are people younger than they are Morbidity Older people attend funerals more often They bury their parents They bury their best friend They bury their spouse And, if they live long enough, they may bury one of their own adult children All this can tempt older adult to succumb to morbid despair Morbidity At many funerals Ive attended, I especially notice younger pastors who often have little to say about heaven or the resurrection during

the service They focus instead on celebrating the life and work of the dead person, as if all that counts is what people do In addition, Ive talked to several pastors from various denominations about their older congregants Morbidity Now perhaps it is because they are in the early stages of their own death Or theyve been constantly told that life is all that matters This is how older saints plunge into an ever-spiraling funk of morbidity They start thinking only of their coming departure and thinking little of the life beyond

Morbidity is a besetting One Foot in the Grave Victor Meldrew of the British sitcom television series One Foot in the Grave is a cantankerous old codger whose extreme grumpiness provides the humor in each episode The show ran from 1990 -2001 (6 series & 7 Christmas specials) We never know what Meldrew was like as a Always Shrouded in Death The only vitality about him is the intensity of his

annoyance and irritation at the state of the world He has lost all sight of the goodness of life and the blessings it lavishes on him He lives shrouded in death Old age has made him the kind of person whothan will never happy until his one foot Rather living be shrouded in theBible grave is joined death,inthe

teaches usby to the other Resisiting the Focus on Morbidity How can we resist the sin of morbidity? Quit reading the obituaries mathematically Read them to find people to pray for, but avoid seeing the death of others as your own mathematical curtain call Accepting our own deaths is good, but

dwelling on it is Resisiting the Focus on Morbidity How can we resist the sin of morbidity? Encourage our pastors to preach faithbuilding sermons on the resurrection, heaven, and running the Christian life well to the end Faith comes by hearing Read and study books on these subjects Ask the session to consider a Sunday School class taught on these topics as well Resisiting the Focus on Morbidity

How can we resist the sin of morbidity? Tenderly confront other aged friends who are soaking in a bath of morbidity Lovingly draw them out so they focus on what they still have left to gain and to give Resisiting the Focus on Morbidity How can we resist the sin of morbidity? So far we have looked at how older saints can combat this morbid temptation But while this is a besetting sin of old age, it is not like the aged celebrate their 60th birthday and then fall into these temptations The old man, like a snail, carries his house on his back

He may change neighbors or locations or companions, but he cannot get away from himself and his own past Building Our House Our certain death must invigorate our current lives Putting one foot in the grave is the way to plant the other on the path of life Victor Meldrew is a comic anti-hero, the exact opposite of the kind of person to be in old age precisely because he is grumpy rather than grateful and this is a sin Old age is the harvest of all the years that have gone before It is the barn into which all the sheaves have been gathered

Building Memories We can make our homes very beautiful We can adorn it with taste and filling it with objects that will minister to our pleasure, comfort and power We may lay up in store great supplies of provision upon which to feed in the days of hunger and feebleness Or we can make our house very gloomy We may make beds of thorns to rest upon We may lay up nothing to feed upon in the hunger and craving of declining years Living a Pure and Holy Life Nothing brings such pure peace and quiet joy at the close as a well-live past

Every day we should be gathering away bundles of wood to keep the fires blazing brightly in the long winter days and nights of old age We are hanging up pictures about the walls of our hearts that we we shall have to look at when we sit in the shadows How important it is that we live pure and holy lives! Even forgiven sins will mar the peace of old age, for the ugly scars will remain Make and Keep Friendships There are some people who do not seem to want to make friends They are unsocial, unsympathetic, cold, distant, selfish Others make no effort to retain the few friends they have I remember the day one of my coworkers opened their fortune

They cast them away for the slightest cause cookie during a luncheon that said "Make new friends and see what happens" Following this advice, he made three new friends and nothing happened Make and Keep Friendships By refusing to make and/or keep friendships we are robbing our later years of joys we cannot afford to lose If we want to walk in the warmth of friendships

beams in the late evening-time, we must seek to make ourselves loyal and faithful friends in the hours that come before We can do this by a ministry of kindness and

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