Data Teams Process for New School Leaders 2014

Data Teams Process for New School Leaders 2014

Data Teams Process for New School Leaders 2014 2015 SY Objectives: Develop an understanding of why data teams are essential to the implementation of RTI, PLCs, and Value Added Describe the characteristics of Data Teams Go through the Data Teams process Consider preparatory steps for principals Review next steps and available support Essential Understandings: During the 2013 2014 SY, APS began a district-wide

rollout of Data Teams Data Analysts have passed rigorous requirements and have become certified to deliver the Data Teams content It is the expectation that ALL schools have functioning Data Teams in the 2014 2015 SY Ongoing support will be provided Data Teams and RTI: This graphic

represents the function of RTI. Notice how the center of it is Data Based Decision Making. This is the work of Data Teams. Data Teams provide a framework to implement RTI with fidelity. We just started PLCs!!! Is this more? PLCs are who we ARE Data Teams are what we DO. How do Data Teams align with our PLCs?

Data Teams are not new! The work of DTs is embedded in the work of PLCs. Its not more. It is structured! The model of PLCs that APS adopted is the Dufoors model. Dr. Rick DuFour defines a professional learning community (PLC) as a group of people working interdependently toward the same goal. Interdependence is an essential element because it: Provides equal access (equity, or universal access) to quality teaching by strengthening each teachers practice through collaboration, coaching, and shared planning End teacher isolation (thus reducing burnout) Help teachers work smarter by sharing the tasks of analyzing data, creating

common assessment tools, and devising research-based instructional strategies for both students who struggle and those who need more challenge What are Data Teams? Data Teams are small, grade-level, department, course-alike, or organizational teams that examine work generated from a Common Formative Assessment (CFA). Your teachers, most likely, already have scheduled team meetings that look like the ones described above. So, whats the difference? Heres the difference . . . Data Teams adhere to: Continuous improvement cycles Examine patterns and trends Establish specific timelines, roles, and

responsibilities to facilitate analysis that results in action. The Data Teams Process for Results This is the process of Data Teams work inside the PLCs. Structured, not more! Step 1: Collect and Chart Data Step 2: Analyze Data and Prioritize Needs Data Teams Process

Step 6: Monitor and Evaluate Results Step 5: Determine Results Indicators Step 4: Select Common Instructional Strategies Step 3: Set SMART

Goals Connection to Student Growth (Value-Added) Connection to Student Growth Value-Added VA information allows educators to better identify what is working well and areas for improvement to help students. VA data provides important diagnostic information not previously available with traditional achievement reporting. VA data allows educators to

assess the impact their programs and practices have on student learning. Data Teams DTs work, in its highest fidelity, is data-driven, strategic, and continuously monitored to make midcourse changes to provide equitable access to achievement for ALL students at ALL schools. With DTs, there are NO more random acts!

Systemic, standardized, effective practices emerge from purposeful data driven work of PLCs. OUR Data Gathering Exercise Data Analysts visited schools and learned a lot about how we are currently using data in APS. We know our school culture, weve done our observations, we have seen some great practices in place, but we have also seen pockets where some important components are missing (namely instructional strategies). We have been asked by stakeholders in schools to ensure there

is a consistent, standardized DTs process in place to make sure all of our kids, no matter where they attend school in APS, attend a school where a functioning DT is in place. Considerations for Principals There are some key components principals will have to consider to make the roll-out of Data Teams a success in their schools. Formation of the TEAMS Start thinking about how these teams might be formed in your schools. This will impact your Master Scheduling (which must be conducive to support

Data Teams meetings) How will the teams be organized to best improve student learning? Choosing Data Team Leaders Start thinking about who you can select to lead each of your Data Teams (DTs). Characteristics of Data Team Leaders Knows instruction Organized Is not currently tapped for multiple obligations in the school

Shows leadership potential Should NOT be someone who is in a leadership position already (coach, assistant principal, department chair, etc.) Characteristics of Data Team Leaders Good Listener Effective facilitator of dialogue Must Sincerely believe that students can achieve at high levels with support from adults Must be willing to challenge the views of peers Must be well informed about instructional strategies Your Data Teams Calendar Start thinking about the districts assessment calendar (i.e., Computer

Adaptive Assessment) and your internal benchmark dates A word about assessments Schools should be administering pre and post Common Formative Assessments (CFAs) for each unit of instruction. Note: C&I has created Pacing Guides for all content areas, and there will be two Formative Assessment Specialists to support this work. Assessments must be aligned to CCGPS. Appropriate levels of DOK must be considered.

How will Data Teams receive feedback? (monitoring for improvement) Guiding Questions How will Data Teams communicate their minutes to you? (i.e., SharePoint) How will you ensure that the adult actions (cause data) truly lead to improved student achievement? How will you ensure that the assessments are being used to inform instruction?

How will you provide specific feedback to your data teams? What will your presence mean for the team? Finallylets weed the garden! Think about this: If we implement Data Teams with FIDELITY, what might we be able to remove from the work load of our teachers? Will there be any duplication of meetings or processes that are currently in place? FAQs Is the term Data Team necessary? Can

we just continue saying PLCs? The term Data Team is a copyrighted term created by the Leadership and Learning Center, whose program we purchased and are implementing. It must be used. You can also use PLCs/Data Teams (DTs). FAQs Will there be more training on PLCs before we are required to implement Data Teams? Data Teams are the structured, strategic work of PLCs. It is not separate work. It will streamline the work of PLCs. FAQs What will the support look like in the schools? Who do we call for support? Your assigned Data Analyst will be available to support the analysis and

interpretation of the data. Content Coordinators will support with aligning instructional strategies. Formative Assessment Specialists will support with creating the common formative assessments (CFAs). The RTI Coordinator will support with interventions and tiered instruction. FAQs Will Data Team Leaders receive a stipend? No, Data Team leaders are simply the leaders of the teams chosen by principals or the respective teams. Data Team leaders demonstrate the characteristics necessary to sustain the Data Team work. (No Administrative Duties) FAQs Will there be more training dates available for new principals and new staff.

The next training is on July 30, 2014, for new school leaders. We are currently looking at the district calendar to determine what dates can be offered to train incoming leaders and newly hired or previously unavailable staff during the upcoming school year. FAQs Are there forms to support monitoring? The training includes forms that can be adjusted for your teams in your manuals. Also, all forms and an electronic Data Teams tracking tool can be located at the R&E website: http://atlantapublicschools.info Questions? Lets Practice the Data Teams Process

Principles of Decision Making for Results (DMR) Antecedents Adult Actions (Cause Data) Accountability * Instructional Strategies * Administrative Structures * Conditions for Learning * Congruence * Respect for Diversity * Fairness * Specificity * Accuracy * Universality

* Feedback for continuous improvement Collaboration Collaboration has to be built into every step of data management and integrated into every data-driven decision. Data Teams Data Teams is a six-step process that allows you to examine student data at the micro level (classroom practitioner level). Data Teams provide a structure for teachers to specifically identify areas of student need and

collaboratively decide on the best instructional approach in response to those needs. Data Teams Definitions: Data Teams use common standards, generate common formative assessments (CFAs), and use common scoring guides to monitor and analyze student performance. Data Teams are small, grade-level, department, course, content, or organizational teams that examine work generated from a common formative assessment (CFA) in order to drive instruction and improve professional practice.

Data Teams have scheduled, collaborative, structured meetings that concentrate on the effectiveness of teaching and learning. ` We are a Professional Learning Community. We do Data Teams. We are a PLC. We do Data Teams. ` PLC s and Data Teams are not competitive practices. We dont advocate one over the other The PLC model provides

the foundation DTs provide the structure, the fuel, and the power behind the PLC See the DuFours work if you have more questions about PLCs An excellent website is allthingsplc.info/ (maintained by Solution Tree) Four Critical Questions that guide a PLC: 1. What are students supposed to know and be able to do? COMMON CORE STANDARDS 2. How do we know when our students have learned? COMMON FORMATIVE ASSESSMENTS 3. How de we respond when students haven't Learned? INTERVENTION 4. How do we respond when students already know the DIFFERENTIATION

content? Data Teams Six-Step Process Step 1: Collect and Chart Data Step 2: Analyze Data and Prioritize Needs Data Teams Process Step 6: Monitor and Evaluate

Results Step 5: Determine Results Indicators Step 4: Select Common Instructional Strategies Step 3: Set SMART Goals The DATA TEAM Meeting Cycle

Meeting 1: First Ever Understand the purpose of Data Teams and their alignment with the beliefs of the school Understand the purpose of Data Teams Understand the six-step Data Teams process [Note: The actions of Meetings 1 & 2 can occur at the same time if time permits.] The DATA TEAM Meeting Cycle Meeting 2: Before Instruction

Meet with the Team to determine the roles, responsibilities, and commitments Determine the common standards or areas of student learning on which the Data Team will focus first Create the short-cycle, common formative pre-assessment to measure a small chunk of learning Identify the date to administer the pre-assessment [Note: The actions of Meetings 1 & 2 can occur at the same time if time permits.]

The DATA TEAM Meeting Cycle Meeting 3: Before-Instruction Collaboration Analyze the pre-assessment results Follow the Six-Step Data Teams process (Note: Examples of the Six-Step Data Teams process follows on the next 6 slides) Step 1: Collect & Chart Data 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0% 0% 0%

0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0% 0%

0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% [Enter Students' Names] [Enter Students' Names] [Enter Students' Names] [Enter Students' Names] [Enter Students' Names] [Enter Students' Names] [Enter Students' Names] [Enter Students' Names] 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Example on pg. 64 in the Training Manual (TM) 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%

[Enter Students' Names] [Enter Students' Names] [Enter Students' Names] [Enter Students' Names] [Enter Students' Names] [Enter Students' Names] [Enter Students' Names] [Enter Students' Names] Name of Intervention Students (Far to Go and Not Likely to Become Proficient) % Intervention # Intervention Name of Students Far To Go But Likely to Become Proficient % Far to Go But Likely to Become Proficient

# Far to Go But Likely to Become Proficient Name of Students Close to Proficiency % Close to Proficiency # Close to Proficiency # Proficient and Higher # Students Teacher 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 TEAM % Proficient and Higher Step 1: Collect and Chart Data 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% [Enter Students' Names] [Enter Students' Names] [Enter Students' Names] [Enter Students' Names] [Enter Students' Names] [Enter Students' Names] [Enter Students' Names] [Enter Students' Names]

Step 2: Analyze Data and Prioritize Needs Why? To identify causes for celebration and to identify areas of concern Considerations: Performance Strengths Needs (Errors and Misconceptions) Performance behavior Inference/Rationale Step 2: Analyze Data and Prioritize Needs

Step 2: Analysis - Identify Strengths and Performance Errors or Misconceptions Identify the prioritized need for each group of students by placing a 1 in the column next to that need. Students Close to Proficiency Performance Strengths Inference Performance Errors and/or Misconceptions Inference Students Far to Go But Likely to Become Proficient Performance Strengths Inference Performance Errors and/or Misconceptions

Inference Intervention Students (Far to Go But Not Likely to Become Proficient) Performance Strengths Inference Performance Errors and/or Misconceptions Inference Example on pgs. 65 66 in the Training Manual (TM) Step 3: Set SMART Goals Why? To identify your most critical goals for student achievement for each category of students (e.g., Proficient, Close to Proficient, Intervention, etc.)

Criteria: Specific (What exactly will we measure)? Measurable (How will we measure it)? Achievable (Is this a reasonable goal)? Relevant (Are goals aligned with the CIP)? Timely (Does each goal have a defined timeframe)? Step 3: Set SMART Goals Step 3: SMART Goal Statement 0% Group: Current Proficiency: End of Unit Date: Topic:

0% Projected Goal: 0% 0% Adjustment: Assessment Tool: Modified Goal: 0% The percentage of students proficient or higher in will increase from 0% to 0% by as measured by a(n) given on .

Example on pg. 67 in the Training Manual (TM) Assessment Date: Step 4: Select Common Instructional Strategies Why? Adult Actions will impact student achievement Strategies are: Action-oriented Measurable

Specific Research-based Considerations: Instructional Strategies should be the main focus during the Data Teams process Instructional Strategies should be research-based Step 4: Select Common Instructional Strategies Step 4: Select Instructional Strategies Review the list below and record selected strategies in the chart. Name of Students Close to Proficiency Identified Need:

Inference: Selected Instructional Strategy Learning Environment Time - Duration of the Teaching of Specific Concepts and Skills Materials for Teachers and Students Assignments, Assessments - Where will students be required to use the strategy? Name of Students Far To Go But Likely to Become Proficient Identified Need: Inference: Selected Instructional Strategy

Learning Environment Time - Duration of the Teaching of Specific Concepts and Skills Materials for Teachers and Students Assignments, Assessments - Where will students be required to use the strategy? Name of Intervention Students (Far to Go and Not Likely to Become Proficient) Identified Need: Inference: Selected Instructional Strategy Learning Environment Time - Duration of the Teaching of

Specific Concepts and Skills Example on pgs. 68 69 in the Training Manual (TM) Materials for Teachers and Students Assignments, Assessments - Where will students be required to use the strategy? Step 5: Determine Results Indicators Why? To Describe explicit behaviors (both student and adult) we expect to see as a result of implementing the instructional strategies plan. How will you know that the strategies are working? Look-fors and evidence/artifacts of learning? What are proficient students able to do successfully?

Considerations: Serve as an interim measurement Used to determine effective implementation of a strategy Used to determine if strategy is having the desired impact Used to help determine midcourse corrections Step 5: Determine Results Indicators Step 5: Results Indicators Name of Students Close to Proficiency Identified Need: Inference:

Results Indicators: Selected Strategy: Adult Behaviors: Student Behaviors: Look fors in Student Work: Name of Students Far To Go But Likely to Become Proficient Identified Need: Inference: Results Indicators: Selected Strategy: Adult Behaviors: Student Behaviors: Look fors in Student Work:

Name of Intervention Students (Far to Go and Not Likely to Become Proficient) Identified Need: Inference: Results Indicators: Selected Strategy: Adult Behaviors: Student Behaviors: Look fors in Student Work: Example on pgs. 70 71 in the Training Manual (TM) The DATA TEAM Meeting Cycle Monitoring Meetings Occur between Meeting 3 and Meeting 4

Discuss the strategies. Are they working? Are the strategies having the desired impact on student learning? Bring student work samples showing evidence of effectiveness of strategies Make mid-course corrections if necessary Model the strategies to ensure fidelity of implementation

if needed Step 6: Monitor and Evaluate Results Why? To engage in a continuous improvement cycle that: Identifies midcourse corrections where needed Adjusts strategies to ensure fidelity of implementation Example of Step 6 (Monitor and Evaluate Results): Monitoring Plan Template Cluster or School

Team Date Goal Targeted Strategies Has This Strategy Been Implemented? Not Implemented Partially Implemented Implemented Fully Has This Activity Had Impact? Yes No Reasons Implementation Was Incomplete or Did Not Occur?

Dates of Next Monitoring Cycle Reasons Expected Impact Did or Did Not Occur: Evidence of Actual Impact on Instructional Practice and/or Student Learning: Suggested Adjustments or Recommendations: Reflections: Other Relevant Information: The DATA TEAM Meeting Cycle Meeting 4: After-Instruction Collaboration Review Post-Assessment Data from your common formative assessment (CFA)

If the incremental goal was met, create or select the next pre-assessment for the upcoming unit of instruction If the goal was not met, repeat steps of the Data Teams process The DATA TEAM Meeting Cycle The Cycle Continues Meeting before instruction (same as Meeting 3)

Monitoring Meetings Meeting after instruction (same as Meeting 4) Questions? Website Resources Data Teams Resources http://atlantapublicschools.info Student Growth Percentiles (SGP) http://www.WhatIsSGP.com

R&E Dashboards http://dashboard.atlantapublicschools.info 2014 2015 Curriculum Resources https://my.apsk12.org/ci/sites/Teaching%20and%20Learning/default.aspx RTI Resources https://my.apsk12.org/ci/sites/Teaching%20and%20Learning/Pages/Response-to-Instruction-and-Intervention.aspx Additional Support: Data Teams Refresher Courses will be offered during the 2014-15 SY. Check MyPLC for updates and to register. Always Feel free to Contact your Regional Data Analysts

in the department of Research & Evaluation for School Improvement: East Region Stacey L. Johnson ([email protected]) West Region Curtis L. Grier ([email protected]) South Region Adrienne T. Johnson ([email protected]) North Region Vacant (TBD) CLL Adam Churney ([email protected])

Recently Viewed Presentations

  • how detached is technical writing? Teaching interpersonality ...

    how detached is technical writing? Teaching interpersonality ...

    These models possess asymmetrical steady states for symmetric shapes of the catalyst, and some of them exhibit a rich dynamic behavior that includes quasi-periodic phenomena. ... using in the first place the unidimensional model and in the second place the...
  • Vitamins, Minerals, & Water - New Providence School District

    Vitamins, Minerals, & Water - New Providence School District

    Vitamins. Vitamins: nutrients that are made by living things, are required in small amounts, and that assist many chemical reactions. Vitamins help the body with various processes, including the use of other nutrients
  • PERIODONTAL LIGAMENT/ PDL WABeresford ENAMEL DENTINE GINGIVA PULP

    PERIODONTAL LIGAMENT/ PDL WABeresford ENAMEL DENTINE GINGIVA PULP

    PERIODONTAL LIGAMENT/ PDL PULP DENTINE ENAMEL CEMENTUM PERIODONTAL LIGAMENT/ PDL ALVEOLAR BONE GINGIVA WABeresford TOOTH DESIGN: Spear me ENAMEL CEMENTUM DENTINE Shaft is hollow for PULP Hand represented by PERIODONTAL LIGAMENT & ALVEOLAR BONE Refinements Closer to true proportions PERIODONTAL...
  • Blank Jeopardy - Mt. San Antonio College

    Blank Jeopardy - Mt. San Antonio College

    Terms Artists Color Media Techniques 10 10 10 10 10 20 20 20 20 20 30 30 30 30 30 40 40 40 40 40 50 50 50 50 50 * * This type of painting uses several values of...
  • Development of Oxygen Electrodes for High Temperature and

    Development of Oxygen Electrodes for High Temperature and

    ECerS conference 2017, Budapest. Motivation for the work. Selection of materials. Electrochemical activity towards the OER. Chemical stability of materials at high temperature. Processing porous LaNi. 0.6. Fe. 0.4. O. 3. electrodes. 2017-07-13. Motivation and past results (high current density...
  • Aligning learning and assessment - University of Western Sydney

    Aligning learning and assessment - University of Western Sydney

    Paul Parker, UWS Student Learning Unit ''But it's not really user friendly' Student perceptions of criteria & standards and exemplars Learning guides should include: 29(d) Annotated models of student essays or reports, or marking guides, to clarify expectations about what...
  • What is a Global Citizen 1. Who is

    What is a Global Citizen 1. Who is

    Lesson 4: Ch 7 & 8 - Will Callum and Sephy's relationship last? To know. the plot and theme of the story. To understand . the relationships in the story are developing as the plot progresses.
  • AGE DATING THE EARTH Geologic Techniques and The

    AGE DATING THE EARTH Geologic Techniques and The

    AGE DATING THE EARTH Geologic Techniques and The Geologic Time Scale Principles of Dendrochronology The dating of past events (climatic changes) through study of tree ring growth A chronology (arrangement of events in time) can be made by comparing different...