GCSE Religious Studies Specification A Getting Ready to

GCSE Religious Studies Specification A Getting Ready to

GCSE Religious Studies Specification A Getting Ready to Teach Agenda 09:3010:00 10:0011:00 11:0011:45 11:4512:30 Welcome, registration and coffee Session 1 Specification structure and content overview Session 2 Part (a) questions: Structure and assessment Session 3 Part (b) questions: Structure and assessment 12:3013:15 Lunch

13:1514:00 14:0015:00 15:0015:25 15:2515:30 Session 4 Session 5 Session 6 Feedback Part (c) questions: Structure and assessment Part (d) questions: Structure and assessment Resources and support and finish Session 1 Specification structure

and content overview Inspiring great teaching A specification to suit everyone With our suite of two Full Courses and two Short Courses, you can pick the one that meets the needs of all your students Familiar topics Our Areas of Study focus on the key questions in Ethics, Philosophy, as well as focusing on the beliefs, teachings and practices for each religion

Clear and straightforward question papers, mark schemes and assessment grids Excellent support with planners, mapping documents, Getting Started guides and exemplars GCSE reform Fully linear structure and updated subject criteria for content and assessment New 9-1 grading scale with 9 being the top level

Tiering only in certain subjects, such as Maths and Science Policy of external assessment only, unless non-examined assessment (coursework) is the only valid option; GCSE RS is 100% external assessment (exam) Grading Broadly the same proportion of students will achieve a grade 4 and above as those currently achieving a grade C and above.

Broadly the same proportion of students will achieve a grade 7 and above as those currently achieving a grade A and above. The bottom of grade 1 will be aligned with the bottom of grade G. Timeline Specification 2016 Current Specification

Summer series as normal New 2016 Specification First teaching of two-year GCSE 2017 2018 Last assessment First

assessment for Full Course The last available assessment for the current GCSEs will be June 2017. The reformed GCSEs will be reported in the 2018 performance tables. The GCSE reforms: DfE requirements Students must study two religions. More content has been added to the criteria and now details Areas of Study for each religion.

Specific philosophical, ethical and religious themes have been introduced. The criteria have been split into two parts (A & B) to allow specifications to be designed with two different approaches: one allows a 75/25 split between two religions one allows a 50/50 split between two religions. The GCSE reforms: Religions Students must study two religions, chosen from the following:

Buddhism Christianity or Catholic Christianity Hinduism Islam Judaism Sikhism The GCSE reforms: Assessment objectives Objective Weighting

AO1 Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of religion and belief including: beliefs, practices and sources of authority influence of individuals, communities and societies similarities and differences within and/or between religions and beliefs 50% AO2 Analyse and evaluate aspects of religion and belief, including their significance and influence.

50% Our research We have worked with the teaching community, higher education, learned societies and subject associations to design our new GCSE Religious Studies specifications for 2016. Our ambition has been to develop Religious Studies qualifications that you will know and recognise, and to allow you to teach topics and religions you know your students will enjoy.

We have commissioned and conducted our own research, including international benchmarking and trialling. This research will help us to build on the strengths of our current specification and to identify the skills students need to progress to further study in Religious Studies. Specification A: Faith and Practice in the 21st Century 75% of the course based on the study of one religion, allowing you to focus on one religion in depth Offers choice between Philosophy and Ethics and Textual Study of Marks Gospel or the Qur'an, to help you build a course to suit your students Brings to life the foundations of faith and practice GCSE Specification A:

Full Course overview Paper 1 Study of Religion (50%) Choose 1 religion: Christianity, Catholic Christianity or Islam Content: Beliefs and Teachings, Practices, Sources of Wisdom and Authority, Forms of Expression and Ways of Life Assessment: Exam (1 hour 45 mins) Paper 2 - Second Religion (25%) Choose from Christianity, Catholic Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, Judaism, Sikhism must be different from primary religion *students cannot study Christianity and Catholic Christianity together

Content: Beliefs and Teachings, Practices Assessment: Exam (50 mins) EITHER: Philosophy and Ethics (25%) Same as primary religion Content: Existence of God, Relationships and Families in the 21st century Assessment: Exam (50 mins) OR: Textual Studies (25%) Same as primary religion Content: Choice of Marks Gospel or the Quran Assessment: Exam (50 mins)

Specification A Full Course: Assessment structure Paper 1: Short open, open response and extended writing questions for questions 14 SPaG and specialist language is assessed in Part (d) of questions 1 and 3, totalling 6 marks 102 marks in total Papers 2, 3, 4:

Two questions including short open, open response and extended writing responses SPaG and specialist language is assessed in Part (d) of question 1, totalling 3 marks 51 marks in total GCSE Specification A: Short Course overview Study of Religion (50%) Choose one religion: Christianity, Catholic Christianity, Islam, Judaism Content: Beliefs and Teachings, Practices Assessment: Exam (50 mins) Study of Religion (50%) Choose a second religion: Christianity, Catholic Christianity, Islam, Judaism Students must study two different religions

*students cannot study Christianity and Catholic Christianity together Content: Beliefs and Teachings, Practices Assessment: Exam (50 mins) GCSE Specification A: Co-teachability of Full and Short Courses The Short Course for Specification A has been designed to be taught alongside the Full Course. The religions for Paper 1 and Paper 2 of the Short Course are the same as the full GCSE.

The content is the same, with Short Course students focusing solely on Beliefs and Teachings and Practices. In addition, Full Course students are required to look at Sources of Wisdom and Authority and Forms of Expression and Ways of Life in Paper 1, and also choose between Paper 3 and Paper 4. Session 2 Part (a) questions: Structure and assessment Specification A assessment: Paper 1: Catholic Christianity

Question 1: Beliefs and Teachings a) State three of the religious traditions, other than Christianity, in Great Britain (3) b) Explain two reasons why belief in the incarnation is important for Catholics. (4) c) Explain two Catholic teachings about the Trinity. In your answer you must refer to a source of wisdom and authority. (5) d) Belief in hell is very important. Evaluate this statement, considering arguments for and against. In your response you should: refer to Catholic teachings refer to different Christian points of view reach a justified conclusion. (15; 3 for SpaG)

Assessment objective for Part (a) questions These questions are designed to test AO1. They require candidates to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of religion and belief including: beliefs, practices and sources of authority influence of individuals, communities and societies similarities and differences within and/or between religions and beliefs.

Part (a) question format Part (a) questions will generally follow a set format: They will ask candidates to Outline three. They will require candidates to provide three one-sentence answers to the question. Candidates receive one mark per correct response to a maximum of three marks. Part (a) question format Some part (a) questions could also assess the students ability to recognise other religious traditions in Great Britain.

These questions will only need single word responses and the command word for these questions will be State. For example: a) State three of the religious traditions, other than Christianity, in Great Britain Example question and mark scheme Question: Outline three features of the sacrament of reconciliation. Award one mark for each point identified up to a maximum of three: The The The

The The penitent confesses their sins. (1) penitent makes an act of contrition. (1) priest offers advice to the penitent. (1) priest gives a penance. (1) priest gives absolution. (1) Accept any other valid response. Example question and mark scheme Question: State three of the religious traditions, other than Christianity, in Great Britain. AO1 3 marks:

Judaism (1) Islam (1) Buddhism (1) Sikhism (1) Hinduism (1) Accept any other valid response. What do outline and state mean? Simple! Provide knowledge of religion and belief by recalling factual

information No more than one sentence per mark is required for outline; no more than one word per mark is required for state. Outline and state do not require: development added description added examples added quotations. What will students be asked to outline? This can vary:

Features Ways Beliefs Responses to something Events in Reasons for doing something Teachings Elements

Types Characteristics Examples of different outline questions Outline three features of the sacrament of reconciliation. Outline three roles of the minister in the Church. Outline three ways Christian Aid works to relieve suffering.

Outline three events that happen on Hajj. Outline three characteristics of the Almighty. Activity 1: Write a possible Part (a) question Ensure you have blank paper, a pen, a copy of the specification and a copy of the SAMs Select one section of the specification that you are likely to

teach. Select a bullet point in that section. Attempt to write a Part (a) question for that bullet point: it cannot be non-religious, and it cannot show the religion in a negative light. Swap it with the person next to you to check. Session 3 Part (b) questions:

Structure and assessment Specification A assessment: Paper 1: Catholic Christianity Question 1: Beliefs and Teachings a) State three of the religious traditions, other than Christianity, in Great Britain (3) b) Explain two reasons why belief in the incarnation is important for Catholics. (4) c) Explain two Catholic teachings about the Trinity. In your answer you must refer to a source of wisdom and authority. (5) d) Belief in hell is very important. Evaluate this statement, considering arguments for and against. In your response you should: refer to Catholic teachings refer to different Christian points of view

reach a justified conclusion. (15; 3 for SpaG) Part (b) question format They will ask students to Explain two. For example: Explain two reasons why Holy Week is important for Christians. Explain two ways the Muslim identity is expressed in the ummah. Explain two reasons why belief in the incarnation is important for Catholics.

There will be some variation in the way these are asked, but they are essentially asking the same thing. Assessment objective for part (b) questions The questions are designed to test AO1. They require candidates to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of religion and belief, including: beliefs, practices and sources of authority

influence of individuals, communities and societies similarities and differences within and/or between religions and beliefs. Answering Part (b) questions Part (b) questions have four marks. Candidates give two reasons; they will not be credited for giving more than 2 reasons. They need to demonstrate a higher level of understanding

by giving a reason and then by developing it. Development: Answering Part (b) questions Marks are awarded for the reason (1) and for the development of the reason (1). It is therefore important candidates understand what development is. Development must address the both the question set and the reason already given; they must link clearly. The best forms of development are quotations,

exemplification and evidence which supports the reason. To get full marks, candidates need to: give a reason and then develop it give a second (different) reason and develop it in a way different to the first reason. Development: Answering Part (b) questions Development must link to the reason given and give more information about the question asked. For example, when dealing with the question: Explain two reasons why belief in the incarnation is important for Catholics.

An acceptable reason is because the incarnation is a central message of the Bible and life of Jesus. Acceptable development would be it is the belief that God became human in the person of Jesus. It is not acceptable to develop by saying and the Bible is important to Christians because it contains the word of God the question is about the Trinity, not about the Bible, so this is not relevant development. Example question and mark scheme Question: Explain two ways Catholics respond to the problem of suffering. Acceptable content:

Humans have been given freewill by God, (1) which some use wrongly to cause harm to others. (1) Catholics will follow the example of Jesus during his mortal life, (1) by helping people who are suffering(1) St Paul suggests that God does not place burdens/ temptations on people that they cannot bear, (1) which shows that God is benevolent and helps sufferers. (1) Comparison of Christianity and other religions Students will be expected to study their chosen religion with the context of the wider British society whose religious traditions are, in

the main, Christian. Students should compare and contrast the areas of belief and practice within other religions with Christianity. The two areas of content where this is a requirement are marked with asterisks (*) in the specification. For example, in Area of Study 1 for Catholic Christianity they are: Beliefs about the afterlife and their significance (1.8)* The practice and significance of worship (2.2)* Example of a Part (b) question: Question: Describe two differences between worship in the Catholic Church and the main religious tradition of Great Britain. AO1 4 marks Students are required to recognise that Christianity is the main religious tradition of Great Britain Award one mark for describing a relevant Catholic belief/practice. Award a second mark for a contrasting description from another Christian tradition.

The Catholic Church believes that the bread and wine become the body and blood of Christ during the Eucharist (1) whereas in other Christian traditions, worshippers believe the bread and wine are purely as remembrance of the death of Christ (1) The Eucharist is central to Catholic worship with communion being offered at Mass (1) whereas some Christians do not celebrate the Eucharist (1) Catholic worship follows a fixed pattern and includes structured liturgy (1) whereas in other Christian traditions worship is more charismatic focusing on the Bible and guidance by the Holy Spirit (1) Activity 2: Part (b) question practice

Ensure you have some sticky notes or your activity booklet, a pen, a copy of the specification and a copy of the SAMs. Select one section of the specification that you are likely to teach. Select a Part (b) question in that section. Write a reason that answers the question on your sticky note or in your activity booklet.

Swap with the person next to you; they have to write a development on your reason. Check each others answers. Lunch We will resume at 13:15 for Session 4. Session 4 Part (c) questions: Structure and assessment Specification A assessment: Paper 1: Catholic Christianity

Question 1: Beliefs and Teachings a) State three of the religious traditions, other than Christianity, in Great Britain (3) b) Explain two reasons why belief in the incarnation is important for Catholics. (4) c) Explain two Catholic teachings about the Trinity. In your answer you must refer to a source of wisdom and authority. (5) d) Belief in hell is very important. Evaluate this statement, considering arguments for and against. In your response you should: refer to Catholic teachings refer to different Christian points of view reach a justified conclusion. (15; 3 for SpaG)

Part (c) question format Part (c) questions will ask candidates to Explain two. For example: Explain two Explain two Explain two Explain two reasons why Catholics work for peace. ways Diwali is celebrated. Jewish teachings about the covenant with Abraham. Sikh teachings about rebirth. There will be some variation in the way these are asked, but candidates will need to respond in the same way. Candidates must also refer to a source of wisdom and authority in their response The sources of wisdom provided in the specification and on the MS are

there to assist teachers, and other sources will be accepted as valid responses Assessment objective for Part (c) questions The questions are designed to assess AO1. One mark will be awarded for each reason/belief. Further marks will be awarded for each development of the reason/belief, up to a maximum of four marks. One further mark will be awarded for any relevant source of wisdom or authority. Example question and mark scheme Question: Explain two Islamic teachings on the importance of prophethood. In your answer you must refer to a source of wisdom and authority. For example:

Belief in the first prophet, Adam, shows that Islam existed from the beginning of man (1) and has been central for all of time (1) We make no distinction between any of them (Surah 2:136) showing a consistent chain of prophecy from Allah since he created mankind(1) Prophethood is the channel between Allah and mankind (1) therefore without it humanity could not reach akhirah (1) as Allah has revealed his truth through the stories of the prophets in the Quran. (Surah 2:136) (1) Activity 3: Part (c) question practice

Ensure you have paper, a pen, a copy of the specification, a copy of the SAMs, and a copy of the exemplar in your activity booklet. Write notes on the exemplar. We will go through it on the board as part of this presentation. Check your assessment of the exemplar with the trainer and the person sitting next to you. Activity 3: Exemplar Question: Explain two Islamic teachings on the importance of

prophethood. In your answer you must refer to a source of wisdom and authority. Prophethood is the way that Allah communicates with mankind, therefore without it humanity could not gain a positive afterlife. Belief in prophethood is one of the six beliefs and so is an essential belief in order to be a Muslim which is shown in the Quran that makes it clear that disbelief in prophethood is disbelief in Allah. Activity 3: Exemplar marked Question: Explain two Islamic teachings on the importance of prophethood. In your answer you must refer to a source of wisdom and authority. Prophethood is the way that Allah communicates with mankind, therefore without it humanity could not gain a positive afterlife. Belief in prophethood is one of the six beliefs and so is an essential belief in order to be a Muslim which is shown in the

Quran that makes it clear that disbelief in prophethood is disbelief in Allah. Session 5 Part (d) questions: Structure and assessment Specification A assessment: Paper 1: Catholic Christianity Question 1: Beliefs and Teachings a) State three of the religious traditions, other than Christianity, in Great Britain (3) b) Explain two reasons why belief in the incarnation is important for Catholics. (4) c) Explain two Catholic teachings about the Trinity. In your answer you must refer to a source of wisdom and authority.

(5) d) Belief in hell is very important. Evaluate this statement, considering arguments for and against. In your response you should: refer to Catholic teachings refer to different Christian points of view reach a justified conclusion. (15; 3 for SpaG) Part (d) question format (Example 1) Part (d) questions will ask candidates to evaluate. For example: Belief in hell is very important. Evaluate this statement, considering arguments for and against. In your response you should: refer to Catholic teachings refer to different Christian points of view reach a justified conclusion.

This is from a Catholic paper but the format is the same on all Part (d) questions. There is a stimulus quotation, which is meant to allow discussion of two views and allow candidates to reach a conclusion. There is a requirement to refer to the religion which students have studied for this examination paper. Part (d) question format (Example 2) Part (d) questions will ask candidates to evaluate. For example:

The purpose of sex is to have children. Evaluate this statement, considering arguments for and against. In your response you should: refer to Catholic teaching refer to non-religious points of view reach a justified conclusion. This is from a Catholic paper, but the format is the same on all Part (d) questions. There is a stimulus quotation, which is meant to allow discussion of two views, and allow candidates to reach a conclusion. There is a requirement to refer to the religion and non-religious points of

views which candidates have studied for this examination paper, as indicated in some of the bullet points within the specification. Part (d) question format (Example 3) Part (d) questions will ask candidates to evaluate. For example: Religious experiences prove the existence of God. Evaluate this statement, considering arguments for and against. In your response you should: refer to Christian teaching refer to non-religious points of view refer to relevant philosophical arguments reach a justified conclusion. There is a stimulus quotation, which is meant to allow discussion of two views, and allow candidates to reach a conclusion.

There is a requirement to refer to the philosophical and ethical responses to certain topics which candidates have studied for this examination paper, as indicated in some of the bullet points within the specification. Assessment objective for Part (d) questions These questions are designed to assess AO2. For AO2: Analyse and evaluate aspects of religion and belief, including their significance and influence. Mark scheme for Part (d) questions Part (d) questions are marked using a levels mark scheme. To get the top level, candidates need to:

critically deconstruct religious information/issues, leading to coherent and logical chains of reasoning consider more than one point of view demonstrate a sustained, accurate and thorough understanding of religion and belief make connections between the full range of elements in the question

construct coherent and reasoned judgments of the full range of elements in the question ensure judgments are fully supported by the comprehensive appraisal of evidence, leading to a fully justified conclusion. Activity 4: Part (d) question practice Ensure you have paper, a pen, a copy of the specification, a copy of the SAMs, and a copy of the exemplar in your activity booklet.

Write notes on the exemplar. We will go through it on the board as part of this presentation. Check your assessment of the exemplar with the trainer and the person sitting next to you. Activity 4: Exemplar Evaluate this statement: Belief in hell is very important. Belief in hell may not be very important for Catholics because forgiveness is a key belief, they believe if God is all forgiving then there is no one whose sins cannot be forgiven; therefore no one should be condemned to hell; this would even apply to a serious sinner who repents at the end of their life. Hell might also not be important as Roman Catholics teach that purgatory is a place that purifies and punishes sinners which will allow access to heaven eventually as God is believed. Other Christians suggest that the reality of hell was affirmed at the Council of

Nicaea and in the Bible; this belief in hell keeps Christians faithful to their beliefs; as such it encourages them to keep the commandments because they want to avoid hell. In conclusion I would suggest that belief in hell is very important as it helps people avoid sin and encourages Catholics to go to confession regularly; in this way they will always be prepared whenever death comes. Activity 5: Part (d) question practice Ensure you have paper, a pen, a copy of the specification and a copy of the SAMs. Work in a small group.

Write one of the Part (d) question stimuli on the piece of paper. Write anything you feel might be appropriate reasons, quotations, strengths, weaknesses. As a group, link up the ideas to make a coherent argument with a line. This shows what a candidates answer could be like.

What is your groups conclusion? SPaG for Q1 and Q3: Part (d) questions Each paper will assess spelling, punctuation and grammar (SPaG) and use of specialist terminology. SPaG contributes to a minimum of 5% of marks towards the overall weighting of the paper.

Each paper has six marks for SPaG. The Part (d) questions on Q1 and Q3 have 3 marks awarded for SPaG. SPaG: Mark grid Descriptors 0 marks No marks awarded

The learner writes nothing The learners response did not relate to the question The learners achievement in SPaG did not reach the threshold performance level, for example errors in spelling, punctuation and grammar severely hinder meaning 1 mark Threshold performance Learners spell and punctuate with reasonable accuracy Learners use rules of grammar with some control of meaning and any errors do not significantly hinder meaning overall

Learners use a limited range of specialist terms as appropriate 2 marks Intermediate performance 3 marks High performance

Learners spell and punctuate with considerable accuracy Learners use rules of grammar with general control of meaning overall Learners use a good range of specialist terms as appropriate Learners spell and punctuate with consistent accuracy Learners use rules of grammar with effective control of meaning overall Learners use a wide range of specialist terms as appropriate Session 6 Resources and support Supporting great Religious Studies teaching Plan

Develop Teach Track & Assess Free qualifications support: www.edexcel.com/RS16Support Free support for planning Course planners for two- and three-year courses Course planners for Full and Short Courses Scheme of work following two-year course planners Free support for teaching

Mapping documents to current GCSE content Mapping to the Catholic Directory Getting Started guide Published resources We are committed to helping teachers deliver our Edexcel qualifications and students to achieve their full potential. To do this, we aim for our qualifications to be supported by a wide range of high-quality resources, produced by a range of publishers. However, it is not necessary to purchase endorsed resources to deliver our qualifications. Resources* by other publishers We are working with a range of publishers who are looking towards getting their resources endorsed:

Hodder: Victor Watton and Hodder Education will guide you through the 2016 GCSE RS specifications with brand new students books. OUP: Oxford is publishing new resources for Edexcel GCSE RS. Visit the OUP website to find out more. ZigZag: Photocopiable and digital resources for the new GCSE and A level RS specifications, for learning, revision and exam practice. *These resources have not yet been endorsed. This information is correct as of January 2016, but may be subject to change.

No paid-for products or services are required to deliver Pearson Edexcel qualifications. Support for tracking and assessment Additional specimen papers so you can get to grips with the format of the new papers and the level of demand as quickly as possible, and have extra papers to use with students for exam preparations Student exemplars with commentary Mock-exam marking training ResultsPlus and examWizard ResultsPlus provides the most detailed analysis available of your students exam performance. This free online service helps you identify topics and skills where students could benefit from further learning, helping them gain a deeper understanding

of Religious Studies. examWizard is a free exam preparation tool containing a bank of past Edexcel Religious Studies exam questions, mark schemes and examiners reports, so you can create mock papers, homework or practice tests in minutes. Contact details Contact the Religious Studies team with any questions: Email: [email protected] Tel: 0844 463 2817 webpage: www.edexcel.com/gcsereligiousstudies16 Sign up for Religious Studies emails to get the latest news AS and A level Religious Studies are also being redeveloped for 2016 AS and A level Religious

Studies Redeveloped for first teaching September 2016 First assessment: AS 2017, A level 2018 Students choose three out of four components: Philosophy of Religion Religion and Ethics New Testament Studies Study of Religion from a choice of six Pearson is recruiting Pearson is recruiting for GCSE and GCE Religious Studies. We have exciting opportunities for those wishing to become

an examiner for Religious Studies: Get closer to the qualification you are teaching Gain insight on National Standards Grow your career Apply via the Pearson website Next steps Please complete your evaluation form (in your pack) for todays event. Sign up to our updates by email: T [email protected]

Visit the website to download copies of the draft specification and support materials: www.edexcel.com/gcsereligiousstudies16 Would you like to help produce exemplars? Please note on the evaluation form if so. Questions?

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