GLOBAL GRANTS 2014 2014 TOPICS/GOALS FOR THIS SESSION

GLOBAL GRANTS 2014 2014 TOPICS/GOALS FOR THIS SESSION

GLOBAL GRANTS 2014 2014 TOPICS/GOALS FOR THIS SESSION

Global Grant basics How to select/design a Grant Significant rules Learn how to apply for a Global Grant and get it Approved Execution Reporting 2014

PROCESS OVERVIEW Qualify your Club

Find or Create a Global Grant Apply for District Match (DDF) Apply for World Fund Match Implement the Project Report Spread the Word 2014 CLUB QUALIFICAT

ION 2014 CLUB QUALIFICATION Attendance by at least one Club member at the Districts Grant Management Seminar. Club Memorandum of Understanding read, understood, and signed by future Club President (2014-2015)

President-elect (2015-2016 President) Club must be current on all grant reporting. Club must be current on District dues. Club must be current on RI dues. 2014 GLOBAL GRANT BASICS

2014 WHAT IS A GLOBAL GRANT? It is a large-scale project that Aligns with an Area of Focus Responds to a need that the benefiting community has identified Includes the active participation of the benefiting community Is designed to enable the community to help itself

after the Rotary club has concluded its work Has measurable results 2014 HOW IS A GLOBAL GRANT ORGANIZED? It is carried out by two Qualified Rotary clubs in different countries. The Host Sponsor Club is in the area where the project takes place. The International Sponsor Club is the

supporting club. Project funding comes from Rotary clubs, other organizations, and individuals District Designated Funds (DDF) World Fund Match 2014 TYPES OF GLOBAL GRANTS Humanitarian

Global Scholar Packaged Grants 2014 HOW PROJECTS ARE FUNDED Cash provided by Clubs, Members, and other sources. District Designated Funds (DDF) Match Matches Club and Member cash up to $10,000 per club, if allocated by the DRFC.

Clubs can cooperate to handle larger projects. World Fund Match Cash is matched at 50% DDF is matched at 100% 2014 CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE FOUNDATION Contributions to the Annual Program FundSHARE from the Rotary clubs in a District are

directed into two funds: Fifty percent is credited to the World Fund to provide the World Fund Matches for Global Grants. Fifty percent is credited to the Districts District Designated Fund for allocation to District and Global Grants. This happens three years after the money is donated, and Rotary uses the income to pay for Operations in the meantime. 2014

FUNDING EXAMPLE: MINIMUM PROJECT Cash Word Fund Total Project DDF

Totals $10,000 (Club, etc.) $10,000 (District) $20,000 $5,000

$10,000 $15,000 $35,000 2014 ROTARY GLOBAL GRANT REQUIREMENTS Must support Rotarys Mission Statement.

Must deal with at least one of Rotarys Areas of Focus. 2014 AREAS OF FOCUS Peace and conflict prevention/resolution Disease prevention and treatment Water and sanitation Maternal and child health

Basic education and literacy Economic and community 2014 ROTARY GLOBAL GRANT REQUIREMENTS Must support Rotarys Mission Statement. Must deal with at least one of Rotarys Areas of Focus. Must be large enough to require at least $15,000 World Fund Match ($35,000

project minimum). At least 30% of project funding must come from outside the Host country. 2014 DISTRICT 5340 GRANT POLICIES Club cash will be matched by DDF on a 1:1 basis up to $10,000 per Club for approved projects. Project Description and Financing must be posted on the District Global Grants website.

The project must be fully pledged to be considered for DDF. Projects will be evaluated quarterly, starting July, 2014, as long as there is DDF available. A Club may sponsor more than one Global Grant. Clubs can partner to create larger projects. 2014 FINDING

A PROJECT 2014 FINDING A PROJECT The best projects build on existing relationships and past successful projects. Consult with a Friends of District ______ contact. Find new partners and projects on the District

Global Grants website. Go to a Global Grant Fair Visit exhibitors at the RI Convention Involve your club members and board in the selection process. 2014 GLOBAL GRANT FRIENDS OF __________ District Coordinator

3000, India (Tamil Nadu) Dee Doe [email protected] 4100, Mexico Bill Sparks [email protected]

4400, Ecuador David Ballesteros [email protected] 9211 & 9212, East Africa Philippe Lamoise [email protected] 9370, South Africa

Marty Rosenstein shamartr[email protected] 3400 (3420), Indonesia Kathleen Roche-Tansey [email protected] 2014 VETTING A NEW CLUB

Before committing to a partnership with a new Host Club, correspond with the club and determine the timeliness and quality of their responses. Find out how much experience the Host Club has had with Global Grants. Contact the TRF Staff Person for the region of the project and make sure the Host District is Qualified, and that the Club has no delinquent projects. 2014

CREATING A PROJECT Understand the needs of the community. Make sure the community is involved in planning and execution. Define Project Measurements and establish a baseline. Make sure there is a way to achieve Sustainability. Make sure that everyone understands the Stewardship requirements, particularly how

the money is handled, and records are kept. 2014 APPLYING FOR DISTRICT DESIGNATED FUNDS (DDF) 2014 APPLYING FOR DDF

On the Districts Global Grants website: Submit the Project. Complete the Description in some detail. Include a preliminary budget. Discuss Measureability Discuss Sustainability On the Financing page, enter known pledges.

Work to get the project fully pledged. 2014 DISTRICT GLOBAL GRANTS WEBSITE http://www.matchinggrants.org/global 2014 EVALUATION CRITERIA

Meets a well-defined significant need. Deals with a Rotary Area of Focus

Efficiency (people served/$ DDF) Community involvement Rotarian involvement Sustainability Overall quality of proposal/planning Annual Fund giving 2014 APPLYING FOR

WORLD FUND MATCH 2014 THE CHALLENGES This is the second year of the new system and weve learned a lot. There are two challenges: Mastering the website Getting Grant approval with the first draft!

We have the information and tools to handle both challenges. 2014 GETTING STARTED Agree on a name for the project. Identify a Primary Contact person from each club. (Those people should be somewhat computer savvy,

because they will be the only ones at the club level who can access the project.) Identify two additional members from each club to serve on each club's Project Committee. 2014 THE WEBSITE www.rotary.org 2014

GLOBAL GRANT FIRST STEPS 2014 GLOBAL GRANT FIRST STEPS 2014 APPLICATION

2014 APPLICATION 2014 THE APPLICATION The Grant Application Tool contains a series of questions that allows you to describe your project. We have found that there are a particular

set of issues that are of most interest to the staff reviewers. Make sure you deal with the following six areas in a way that the reviewer knows you are doing it, and doing it well. 2014 THE TOP 6 2014

6. AREA OF FOCUS SUPPORT Keep it simple. Make it specific. More than one Area of Focus is not necessarily a plus. 2014 5. COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT Describe how the local community was

involved in assessing the need, and planning the project. 2014 4. ROTARIAN INVOLVEMENT Describe the role of both the Host and International Rotarians in conceiving, planning, and executing the project

2014 3. THE BUDGET Show specifically what kinds of items will be purchased for the project. Provide for Overhead, Contingency and Project Measurement as allowed by the Terms and Conditions document. Do not include Needs Assessment. 2014

2. MEASURABILITY Establish numerical goals that you can measure, and set baselines for those goals. You will be given suggested choices, depending on your Area of Focus. 2014

1. SUSTAINABILITY Show how the project will be selfsustaining, or benefits maintained after the Rotary money has been expended. 2014 SIX PILLLARS OF SUSTAINABILITY

Community: Needs and Strengths Materials & Technology: Local if possible Funding: Long term Knowledge: Training & Outreach Motivation: Incentives & Ownership Monitoring: For at least three years

2014 EXECUTING THE PROJECT 2014 WHEN PROJECT IS APPROVED BY TRF

Set up Project Bank Account. Collect pledges. Send money to TRF using a Multiple Donor Form for each club contributing. Get special MOUs signed. Spend money on project only after TRF has transferred funds to the Bank Account. 2014 TIMELINE FOR 2014-2015

Applications for DDF and World Fund match can be entered into each system now. Evaluations for DDF will occur quarterly starting in July, as long as there is DDF available. From DDF approval to RI Application approval: six months. From RI approval to completion of fundraising: six months. An overdue project may lose its DDF allocation. Progress Report due every 12 months. Final Report due two months after project

completion. 2014 REPORTIN G 2014 REPORTING A Progress Report is due 12 months after TRF funds are disbursed, and every 12

months thereafter. The Final Report is due two months after completion of project and includes an explanation of variances greater than 10%. Reports are submitted online through RI Member Access, completing the appropriate forms plus uploads. Bank statements for all expenses are required for both Progress and Final Reports. 2014

REPORT CONTENT How partners were involved Type of activity Evaluation of project goals

How Area of Focus goals were met How funds were spent Number of beneficiaries and how they benefited. 2014 DONT BE LATE! A late District or Global report will prevent the consideration of a Club for District Designated Funds (DDF).

A late Global Grant report will prevent any approvals by TRF for that club. Too many late Global Grant reports within the district will prevent any action by TRF for any club. 2014 CONGRATULATIONS! You and your Host Club have completed your Global Grant Project. Now tell the world about it.

Upload pictures and stories. Write a press release. Offer to do Club presentations Write an article for the Rotarian. 2014

RESOURC ES 2014 2014 TWO MAIN REFERENCES Grant Management Manual Terms and Conditions for District

and Global grants (More documents and links will be posted on the Rotary Foundation page on the district website.) 2014 Questions 2014

2014 TITLE Content 2014

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