Chapter 2 Global E-Business: How Businesses Use Information

Chapter 2 Global E-Business: How Businesses Use Information

Chapter 2 Global E-Business: How Businesses Use Information Systems 2.1 2007 by Prentice Hall Management Information Systems Chapter 2 Global E-Business: How Businesses Use Information Systems LEARNING OBJECTIVES Define and describe business processes and

their relationship to information systems. Describe the information systems supporting the major business functions: sales and marketing, manufacturing and production, finance and accounting, and human resources. Evaluate the role played by systems serving the various levels of management in a business and their relationship to each other. 2.2 2007 by Prentice Hall Management Information Systems Chapter 2 Global E-Business: How Businesses Use Information Systems LEARNING OBJECTIVES (Continued)

Explain how enterprise applications and intranets promote business process integration and improve organizational performance. Assess the role of the information systems function in a business. 2.3 2007 by Prentice Hall Management Information Systems Chapter 2 Global E-Business: How Businesses Use Information Systems Business Processes and Information Systems

Business processes How information technology enhances business processes: efficiency and transformation 2.4 2007 by Prentice Hall Management Information Systems Chapter 2 Global E-Business: How Businesses Use Information Systems Business Processes and Information Systems The Order Fulfillment Process

Fulfilling a customer order involves a complex set of steps that requires the close coordination of the sales, accounting, and manufacturing functions. Figure 2-1 2.5 2007 by Prentice Hall Management Information Systems Chapter 2 Global E-Business: How Businesses Use Information Systems Types of Business Information Systems Systems from a functional perspective Sales and marketing systems Manufacturing and production systems

Finance and accounting systems Human resources systems Systems from a constituency perspective Transaction processing systems Management information systems and decision-support systems Executive support systems Relationship of systems to one another 2.6 2007 by Prentice Hall Management Information Systems

Chapter 2 Global E-Business: How Businesses Use Information Systems Types of Business Information Systems Overview of an Inventory System This system provides information about the number of items available in inventory to support manufacturing and production activities. Figure 2-3 2.7 2007 by Prentice Hall Management Information Systems Chapter 2 Global E-Business: How Businesses Use Information Systems

Types of Business Information Systems Information Systems Help Kia Solve Its Quality Problems Read the Interactive Session: Organizations, and then discuss the following questions: Why was it so difficult for Kia to identify sources of defects in the cars it produced? What was the business impact of Kia not having an information system to track defects? What other business processes besides manufacturing and production were affected? How did Kias new defect-reporting system improve the way it ran its business? What management, organization, and technology issues did Kia have to address when it adopted its new quality control system? What new business processes were enabled by Kias new quality

control system? 2.8 2007 by Prentice Hall Management Information Systems Chapter 2 Global E-Business: How Businesses Use Information Systems Types of Business Information Systems Interrelationships Among Systems The various types of systems in the organization have interdependencies. TPS are major producers of information that is required by many other systems in the firm, which, in turn, produce information for other systems. These different types of systems are loosely coupled in most business firms, but increasingly firms are using new technologies to integrate information

that resides in many different systems. Figure 2-10 2.9 2007 by Prentice Hall Management Information Systems Chapter 2 Global E-Business: How Businesses Use Information Systems Systems That Span the Enterprise Enterprise applications

Enterprise systems Supply chain management systems Customer relationship management systems Knowledge management systems Intranets and extranets E-business, e-commerce, and e-government 2.10 2007 by Prentice Hall Management Information Systems

Chapter 2 Global E-Business: How Businesses Use Information Systems Systems That Span the Enterprise Enterprise Application Architecture Enterprise applications automate processes that span multiple business functions and organizational levels and may extend outside the organization. 2.11 Figure 2-11 2007 by Prentice Hall

Figure 2-12 2.12 2007 by Prentice Hall Management Information Systems Chapter 2 Global E-Business: How Businesses Use Information Systems Systems That Span the Enterprise Example of Supply Chain Management System Customer orders, shipping notifications, optimized shipping plans, and other supply chain information flow among Haworths Warehouse Management System (WMS), Transportation Management System (TMS), and its back-end corporate systems.

Figure 2-13 2.13 2007 by Prentice Hall Management Information Systems Chapter 2 Global E-Business: How Businesses Use Information Systems The Information Systems Function in Business The information systems department Organizing the information systems function 2.14

2007 by Prentice Hall 2.15 2007 by Prentice Hall

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