Weston, 2009 Physical Properties of Matter So many

 Weston, 2009 Physical Properties of Matter So many

Weston, 2009 Physical Properties of Matter So many ways to describe matter! #1 Whats your job during these notes? 1. Pay attention. Youll learn nothing if you daydream, do other stuff, or spend 5 minutes in the bathroom.

2. Write notes as we go along. For now, youre not responsible for deciding what to writethat will be done for you. However, you should write neatly so that you can read these notes later. 3. Ask questions if youre confused or want clarification. Telling me about your new puppy might not be our best use of time, but ontopic discussions will help everyone in the class. 4. Follow the class expectations so that we have a nice & easy time doing this. #2 Lets get started on your

Write your heading paper. Notes Physical Properties Lets title this. Now heres the important part. To make this set of notes useful to you, it has to be neat & organized. For the rest of the year, Ill make anything you need to write on your paper in red text,

like I did with the title up there. Got it? Lets get started here. #3 What are Physical Properties? Well, we know that all matter has mass (its made of stuff) and it has volume (takes up an amount of space). It doesnt matter if its a flea or a whale

its made of matter. The most enormous stars and the tiniest, microscopic air molecules are matter, too. #4 Yes, and? But matter has properties beyond just mass and volume, right? I mean, after all, if I asked you to describe this object here: you wouldnt just tell me, It has a mass of 34 grams and a volume of 23 milliliters. Youd use words like delicious, gooey, yummy, soft, smells good, and so on and so on. Well, as nice as it would be to just use whatever

adjectives we wanted to describe matter, there are a few that we use all the time that count as physical properties. This is the important partif its a way to describe a substance WITHOUT changing it into a new substance, its a physical property! #5 Definition Notes Physical Properties I like to write notes in I. Physical Properties descriptions of matter that can be observed without changing it into a new something called

substance. outline form. Its a way to use numbering The Roman Numeral I lets you know and lettering to see this is the first major topic in these how things are grouped notes. and related. Youll get the hang of it just be careful with

Notice how I use underlines to your indents for now! make points of emphasisthis helps to really make a point to yourself if you read these notes later. #6 DENSITY Density is a weird one. You know by now that all matter has mass and volume. But density tries to describe how packed in the mass is within that volume. In other words, how compact is the stuff?

This golf ball and marshmallow are about the same size (volume). But which is going to have more mass? The golf ball has way more mass. Since theyre about the same size, you know that the golf ball has a higher density. #7 Density, contd. Whats heaviera pound of steel or a pound of feathers? Well, a pound is a pound, so they have the same weight. But what would those two piles of objects look like?

Hi, Joe. A pound of steel, yeah. Yo. And a pound of feathers. Its clear steel is WAY more dense than feathers.

#8 More on Density Dont forget! Gases and liquids have densities too! Thats why when a lot of substances are put in the same container, they often form layers based on their densities!

#9 Back to Our Notes Notes Physical Properties Since were going to start listing examples of physical properties, we will indent them and letter them to go under the Roman Numeral I. Indent about the width of

your pinky. I. Physical Properties descriptions of matter that can be observed without changing it into a new substance. A. Density describes how compact the matter is in a substance. A bowling ball is more dense than a beach ball. #10 COLOR Well, it might be pretty simple to say that a frog is green or jeans

are blue or Joe is red, but theres some pretty technical reasons for why things have colors. The point is that you can describe a substances color without changing it into a new substance. #11 Write it! Notes Physical Properties I. Physical Properties descriptions of matter that can be observed without changing it into a new substance. A. Density describes how compact the matter

is in a substance. A bowling ball is more dense than a beach ball. B. Color describes how light reflects off a substance. #12 LUSTER Ooohhhlook at that biscuit. Ooohhhlook at this gold ring.

I desire the one on the left for its tastiness. I desire the one on the right for its LUSTER. Luster describes how shiny a substance is. #12 Get it on your paper! Notes Physical Properties I. Physical Properties descriptions of matter that can be observed without changing it into a new substance. A. Density describes how compact the matter is in a substance. A bowling ball is more dense than a beach ball. B. Color describes how light reflects off a

substance. C. Luster describes how shiny a substance is. A diamond has higher luster than tree bark. #13 TEXTURE Some things are smooth. Others are rough. Thats texture for you.

#14 Im going to retire the notebook paper for now. D. Texture describes the smoothness/roughness of a substance. #15 ODOR A substance that gives off an odor, whether good or bad, isnt being changed as it does so! E. Odor describes the smell of a substance.

#16 HARDNESS This one can be a little confusing. Youve probably heard that the hardest substance on Earth is ___________. That means that a diamond can cut any other substance you can think of, even metals. The only thing that can cut a diamond is a slightly more pure diamond! However, that doesnt mean that diamonds are stronger than anything else. Id much rather live in a brick or steel house than a diamond

one. Keep your bricks. Ill take the diamonds! #17 Write it! F. Hardness describes a substances ability to resist shape change. Doesnt always mean strength. #18 CONDUCTIVITY Some substances allow forms of energy,

such as heat, sound, and electricity, to flow through them very easily. Apparently, Joe is one of those substances. These substances are very useful for things like: #18 Conductivity, contd. But other substances are useful to us because theyre NOT good conductors. We call those insulators. . Conductivity describes how well a substance allows heat or

electricity to flow through it. Low conductivity substances are called insulators. #19 MALLEABILITY What do these substances have in common? If you said that they can be pounded with a mallet or hammer or fist or forehead into new shapes easily, then youre right! H. Malleability describes how easily a substance can be formed into new shapes. Opposite of brittle.

#20 DUCTILITY What do THESE substances have in common? Well, of coursetheyre all ductile! That just means they can be stretched or drawn into wires without falling apart or breaking. I. Ductility describes how well a substance can be pulled into thin wires. #21 MAGNETISM

Im not sure how much to say about this. Some substances are magnetic, others arent. J. Magnetism describes if a substance attracts or repels magnets. #22 SOLUBILITY What happens if you take sugar, salt, or kool-aid powder and stir it into water? But you havent made a new substance. The kool-aid and water have just mixed super well because the kool-aid dissolves so easily in water.

#23 The Kool-Aid and Water are Separate? Yep. If you had the worlds best microscope, you could see bits of red kool-aid floating around in clear water. Our eyes just arent good enough to see things that small so it looks like a consistent, red liquid. If you tried the same thing with rocks, youd just have a glass full of wet rocks. Rocks arent soluble, but kool-aid is! K. Solubility describes how well a substance dissolves in another substance like sugar stirred in water. The sugar and water have

NOT made a new substance! #24 STATE OF MATTER A lot of you remembered that matter comes in three states: LIQUID SOLID GAS Whether a substance is solid, liquid, or gas is a physical property. You can easily tell me what it is without having to change the substance.

L. State of Matter describes whether a substance is solid, liquid, or gas. #25 MELTING & FREEZING POINT At what temperature does an ice cube melt into water? At what temperature does liquid water freeze into ice? SAME ANSWER! 320 F or 00 Celsius. This is a property of waterthat 00 Celsius is a magical temperature for this particular substance. Above this temperature it stays liquid, but below it, it freezes to solid. NOTICE that it is still just a physical

property because the water changes, but not into any new substance! M. Melting & Freezing Point describes the temperature at which a solid turns liquid or vice versa. #26 BOILING & CONDENSATION POINT Likewise, whats the magic temperature for water at which the liquid becomes a gas vapor? Yes, 2120 F or 1000 Celsius. N. Boiling & Condensation Point describes the temperature at which a liquid turns gas or vice versa.

#27 Review All these properties that we described are physical properties. This just means that they are ways that scientists commonly describe substances without having to change them into a new substance. Remember this? You should be able to go down your list of physical properties and decide which this cookie has or doesnt have. And then eat

it! #28 And Thats

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