Maximum Flow Networks Suppose G = (V, E)

Maximum Flow Networks Suppose G = (V, E)

Maximum Flow Networks Suppose G = (V, E) is a directed network. Each edge (i,j) in E has an associated capacity uij. Goal: Determine the maximum amount of flow between two specified vertices s and t. The capacity v of a path P is the sum of its constituent edge flows: v = xxij where xij is the flow from vertex i to vertex j. Applications to design: supply networks oil pipelines road traffic 1 Background Assumptions: Integer data Directed network Nonnegative capacities on each arc Vertex s is the source Vertex t is the sink Definitions: Residual network Cut Techniques: 1. Augmenting Paths Examine residual network for s-t paths. 2. Preflow-Push Flow moved according to individual edge not path. 2 Maximum Flow as Linear Programming Problem maximize v subject to x x ji 0 for each i s, t x

sj v x jt v ij j j j j 0 x ij u ij (i, j) E v 0 3 Example 2,4 2 3,9 s 1,2 8,8 3 4 2,6 4,7 t 7,9 Each edge is labeled as (xij, uij) = (flow, capacity). However, this flow value, v(x) = 11, is not a maximum.

4 Residual Network Given a current flow x, keep track of how much further the flow can be increased in each direction of the edge. For any edge in G: The corresponding edge (with capacities) in residual network of G: i xij, uij j uij -xij i j xij The residual network of G, G(x), has edges with positive residual capacity, rij = uij xij + xji. In general, it is the amount by which we can further increase flow from i to j in the current network. 5 Example Re-examined 2,4 2 3,9 s 1,2 8,8 3 4 3 4,7 2,6 t

7,9 Network with flows and capacities. s 2 1 6 1 2 3 2 6 8 4 2 4 2 t 7 3 Residual network with capacities. We know this network flow is not a maximum. How can we get a better one? What do we do in general? 6 Cuts A cut is defined by a partition of the vertex set E into subsets S and S* = E S. The cut [S,S*] consists of all edges with one endpoint in S and the other in S*. The forward edges of [S,S*] are denoted (S, S*). The backward edges are denoted as (S*,S). An s-t cut [S,S*] has s in S and t in S*. The removal of the forward edges in an s-t cut will separate vertices s and t. That is, there is no longer a directed s to t path. The capacity of any cut [S,S*], u[S,S*], is the sum of the capacities of the

forward edges of the cut. u[S,S*] is an upper bound on the amount of flow sent from S to S*. A minimum s-t cut has the smallest capacity among all s-t cuts. 7 Examples of 1-6 cuts 2 10 1 10 4 5 4 8 8 3 5 10 6 8 5 S={ } S* = { } Forward edges of [S,S*]= { } u[S, S*] = = 2 1 10 4

5 4 8 6 8 8 3 5 5 S={ } S* = { } Forward edges of [S,S*]= { } u[S, S*] = = 8 Theorems Theorem If x is any feasible flow and if [S,S*] is any s-t cut, then the flow value, v(x), from s to t is at most u[S,S*]. Corollary the max flow value the minimum cut capacity Max-Flow Min-Cut Theorem For any capacitated network, the value of the maximum s-t flow, x, equals the capacity of a minimum s-t cut, [S,S*]. v(x) = u [S,S*] 9 Improving a Flow Given the flow x, look for a path P from s to t in the residual network G(x) along which flow can be sent. Then send as much flow along P as possible. We call any directed path P from s to t in the residual network an

augmenting path. The residual capacity of such a path is (P) = min{rij:(i, j) P). To augment along P is to send (P) units of flow along each edge of the path. We then modify x and the residual capacities rij appropriately. rij := rij (P) for each edge (i,j) P rji := rji + (P) for each edge (i, j) P Result: flow value, v, increases by (P). 10 Example 2,4 2 3,9 1,2 s 8,8 4 3 4,7 2,6 t s 1 6 1 8 7,9 3

2 2 4 2 3 2 6 4 2 t 7 3 Network with flows and capacities. v Residual network with capacities. =11 Augment along path P = s-2-4-t. (P) = min{6, 2, 3} = 2. new flow value =13 4,4 2 5,9 s 8,8 1,2 3 4 2,6 5 6,7 t 7,9 s

2 1 4 1 8 1 2 6 3 4 4 6 2 t 7 11 Example Augmenting Paths Step 0: initial residual graph is original 2 6 1 4 8 2 8 4 2 4 3 6

2 3 5 1 5 5 4 2 2 3 4 2 1 2 4 1 5 3 2 8 4 3 2 3 5 2 6 6 5

6 Step 2: Push 5 units along path 1-3-5-6 2 6 5 5 Step 3: Push 2 units along path 1-2-5-4-6 4 4 4 3 6 Step 1: Push 4 units along path 1-2-4-6 4 4 1 5 4 2 3 3 2 1 1 5 6 4

2 5 2 6 5 Step 4: Push 1 units along path 1-3-5-4-6 12 Example continued 2 6 1 6 4 2 2 3 1 3 6 7 4 2 5 6 5 2 6 1 No more augmenting paths

8 4 4 8 2 3 6 2 3 5 5 6 2 6,6 1 0,2 6,8 4,4 2,2 3 4 7,8 3,3 5 6 5,5 6,6 Maximum Flow in G is 12

13 THEOREM The following are equivalent statements 1. 2. 3. The s-t flow x with value v(x) is maximum G(x) contains no augmenting path. There is an s-t cut [S,S*] with u[S,S*] = v(x) 14 Generic Augmenting Path Algorithm In this algorithm, we keep sending flow along augmenting paths until no s-t path exists in the residual network. Can carry out calculations entirely on G(x). Flows in G are found at the very end. algorithm augmenting_path; begin x := 0 while G(x) contains a directed path from s to t do begin P = Find_Path(s, t, G(x)); (P) := min{rij: (i,j) P}; augment (P) units of flow along P; update G(x); end; end; 15 Find_Path Options More than one way to pick an augmenting path Poor choices can lead to many augmentations.

Info lost when successive paths are found. Balance effort to find a good path with the reduction in # of augmentations. Maximum capacity select path P such that (P) is as large as possible. Shortest path use the path with the minimum number of edges. Scaling successively solve subproblems with a certain capacity. 3 50 50 1 1 50 4 50 2 16 Distance Labels For the shortest path version of the augmenting path algorithm and for another max flow algorithm, the pre-flow push, the notion of distance labels is needed. The distance label d(j) is a nonnegative integer assigned to each j in G(x). The distance labels are valid if d(t) = 0 d(i) d(j)+1 for each (i,j) G(x) If d(j) are valid, then d(j) is a lower bound on the shortest distance from j to t. If d(s) n then there is no s-t path in G(x). (n = number of vertices in G) An admissible edge in G(x) is one where d(i) = d(j) + 1. An admissible path is a path from s to t consisting of admissible edges and is a shortest

augmenting path from s to t. 3 1 4 5 2 17 Shortest Distance Algorithm Admissible paths are successively built by advancing until vertex t is reached. If no admissible edge is available at some point, then retreat and relabel will be a way of updating distances in the new residual graph. In this way, we maintain valid distance labels without starting from scratch. algorithm shortest augmenting path; begin x:= 0; calculate exact distance labels, d(j) to vertex t; j := s; while d(s) 0}; if E(j) with rjk > 0 empty then d(j) = n; if j s then j := pred(k);

end; algorithm augment; begin derive path P from pred; (P) := min{rij: (i,j) P}; augment (P) units of flow along P; end; 19 Example d(3)=1 3 4 1 5 d(1)=2 3 2 4 1 1 2 3 4 1 1 5 d(4)=0 3 2 4 1 d(2)=1

1. Calculate d(j) 3. Advance 1-2, retreat, relabel vertex 2 d(3)=1 d(1)=2 1 3 4 2 d(3)=1 5 d(4)=0 3 2 4 1 d(2)=1 2. Advance 1-2-4, (P) =1, augment d(1)=2 3 4 1 1 1 5 d(4)=0 3 2 4 1

d(2)=2 4. Advance 1-3-4, (P) =4, augment 20 Example d(3)=1 d(1)=2 3 4 1 1 4 1 3 1 d(3)=1 d(4)=0 4 d(1)=3 5 d(4)=0 2 1 1 2 3 4 1

2 4 1 2 d(2)=2 d(2)=2 5. Advance 1, retreat relabel 1 7. Advance 1, retreat, relabel 1 d(3)=1 d(3)=1 d(1)=3 3 4 1 1 1 3 4 d(1)=4 1 2 d(4)=0 4 1 d(2)=2 6. Advance 1-2-3-4, (P) =1, augment

3 4 5 d(4)=0 2 1 2 1 2 4 1 d(2)=2 8. Maximum Flow achieved 21 Example - Results 4,4 1 2,2 3 5,5 1,3 2 Note monotonicity of distance labels 4 1,1 Note monotonicity of path lengths 1-2-4 1-3-4 1-2-3-4 1 2

3 4 5 6 7 d(1) 2 2 2 2 3 3 4 d(2) 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 d(3) 1 1 1 1 1

1 1 d(4) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 22 Additional Exercises 18 3 22 25 17 11 1 source 13 4 1 source 9 10 2 11 5

8 21 5 6 8 sink 24 6 6 4 30 26 22 7 3 19 17 2 8 6 9 11 7 5 7 3

source 7 sink 4 3 1 2 1 1 4 1 3 2 5 2 2 1 7 6 sink 23 Preflow-push Algorithm Distance labels d(t) = 0; d(i) d(j) + 1 for each (i,j) in G(x) Excess flow e(i) = excess at each vertex for a given preflow Active vertices vertices with positive excess Admissible edges edges that satisfy the condition that d(i) = d(j) + 1 Preflow infeasible solution;

Algorithm strives for feasibility/optimality when all excess at sink and source algorithm preflow-push; begin preprocess; while network contains an active vertex do begin select an active node i; push/relabel(i); end; end; 24 algorithm preprocess; begin x := 0; compute the exact distance labels d(i) from s; xsj := usj for each edge (s,j) in E(s); d(s) := n end; algorithm push/relabel(i); begin if the networks contains an admissible edge (i,j) then push = min{e(i), rij} units of flow from vertex i to vertex j; else replace d(i) by min{d(j)+1: (i,j) in E(i) and r ij > 0}; end; 25 Example 1. Network G 2. preprocess: first residual graph Active nodes: 2, 3 Active nodes: e(1)=0 d(1)=2 e(3)=0 d(3)=1 e(3)=4 d(3)=1 3

3 5 4 3 1 2 4 1 e(4)=0 d(4)=0 e(1)=0 d(1)=4 5 4 3 1 2 4 e(4)=0 d(4)=0 1 2 2 e(2)=0 d(2)=1 e(2)=2 d(2)=1 26 Example Selected node: 2 Active nodes: 3 Selected node: 3

Active nodes: 2 3. Saturating push of 1 unit along 2-4; Relabel distance node 2 Active nodes: 3, 2 e(1)=0 d(1)=4 Active nodes: 2 e(3)=4 d(3)=1 e(3)=0 d(3)=1 3 3 5 4 3 1 4. Push of 4 units along 3-4 2 4 1 e(4)=1 d(4)=0 e(1)=0 d(1)=4 1 4 3 1 2

4 4 e(4)=5 d(4)=0 1 2 2 e(2)=1 d(2)=2 e(2)=1 d(2)=2 27 Example Selected node: 2 Active nodes: Selected node: 3 Active nodes: 5. Push of 1 unit along 2-3 6. Saturating Push of 1 units along 3-4 Active nodes: 3 e(1)=0 d(1)=4 Active nodes: e(3)=1 d(3)=1 e(3)=0 d(3)=1 3 3 1 4

4 2 1 1 2 4 1 2 e(2)=0 d(2)=2 e(4)=5 d(4)=0 e(1)=0 d(1)=4 4 2 1 1 2 5 4 e(4)=6 d(4)=0 1 2 e(2)=0 d(2)=2 28 Preflow-Push: Example 2 10 2

1 10 5 4 8 6 8 8 3 5 5 29 Checking if feasible flow exists Let G = (V,E) be a network with supplies and demands at each vertex b(j) > 0 indicates supply at vertex j b(j)<0 indicates demand at vertex j Assumption: xb(j) = 0 Does a flow, x, exist? Transform into a maximum flow network, G Add a source vertex, s, and a sink vertex, t. Add edge (s, j) with capacity, rsj=b(j), if b(j)>0 Add edge (j, t) with capacity, rjt=b(j), if b(j)<0 Solve max flow from s to t Result: If the max flow in G saturates all the source and sink edges,

then the original problem has a feasible solution. Otherwise, infeasible. 30 Example 1-Feasible Flow? b(2) = 5 2 b(1) = 4 1 6 2 4 4 4 b(4) = -7 8 3 b(3) = -2 31 Example 2-Feasible flow? b(2) = 5 2 b(1) = 4 1 6 3 1 4 4 b(4) = -7 8 3 b(3) = -2 32

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