Building Teams: Broadening the Base for Leadership Copyright

Building Teams: Broadening the Base for Leadership Copyright

Building Teams: Broadening the Base for Leadership Copyright 2014 by The University of Kansas What is a team? A team is a group of people with a commitment to one another, to the team, to a high level of achievement, to a common goal, and to a common vision. Copyright 2014 by The University of Kansas The advantages of teams:

A team broadens what individuals can do. Several heads mean a wider range of ideas. Teams have a great array of talents and skills. Team members learn new skills from their colleagues. Teamwork is more efficient than a number of individuals working singly. Teamwork provides relief when someone's having a

problem. Team workers are more effective. A team member has more ownership of what she's doing. Good teams can build leaders. A shared vision keeps everyone moving forward. Copyright 2014 by The University of Kansas The disadvantages of teams: Team decision-making takes longer. Team effort can be wasted effort. The team's success may hang on the work of the least effective team member. A team might gain momentum in the wrong

direction. The work of team can bog down in interpersonal issues, resentments, and blame. Team members may be reluctant to tell other about their unsatisfactory work. Lost motivation for lack of individual recognition. Copyright 2014 by The University of Kansas When should you build teams? Creating a strategic plan for addressing community issues. Starting up a new organization or initiative. Starting a new program or intervention. Starting a coalition. Planning and carrying out a community

assessment. Evaluating an organization, initiative, or intervention. Copyright 2014 by The University of Kansas When should you build teams? (cont.) Spearheading an advocacy campaign with a specific goal. Running a fundraising event or campaign. Staffing and running an organization or initiative. Engaging in ongoing advocacy. Performing a particular function within a community program or initiative. Changing the community over the long term.

Copyright 2014 by The University of Kansas What makes a good team? Some lessons about Great Groups: Greatness starts with superb people. Great Groups and great leaders create each other. Every Great Group has a strong leader Leaders of Great Groups love talent and know where to find it. Great Groups are full of talented people who can work together. Copyright 2014 by The University of Kansas

Lessons about Great Groups, cont.: Great Groups think they are on a mission from God. Every Great Group is an island -- but an island with a bridge to the mainland. Great Group see themselves as winning underdogs. Great Groups always have an enemy. People in Great Groups have blinders on. Great Groups are optimistic, not realistic. In Great Groups the right person has the right job. The leaders of Great Groups give them what they need and free them from the rest. Great Groups ship (produce results). Great work is its own reward. Copyright 2014 by The University of Kansas

How do you build a team? Start with the best people you can find. Choose team members so they'll have a good fit. Look for members with a diversity of backgrounds and perspectives Look for members with a commitment to the concept of working as a team Look for team members committed to the team's guiding vision Find people with a sense of humor. Copyright 2014 by The University of Kansas Building the team

Start with the vision. Build team bonds. Make sure that the concept of a team is absolutely clear. Involve the team in jointly planning functionality and individual responsibilities. Address personal issues.

Establish team norms. Hash out the logistics of working as a team. Start the team with a doable task that requires teamwork Go back over both successes and failures to learn for the future. Provide both individual and team support. Give people something extra for working as a team. Reward accomplishments like crazy. Copyright 2014 by The University of Kansas

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