Looking Forward 2015: Florida State Report Conducted by

Looking Forward 2015: Florida State Report Conducted by

Looking Forward 2015: Florida State Report Conducted by Association Laboratory Inc. 2015 Overview HOW DID ASSOCIATION LABORATORY CREATE LOOKING FORWARD, THE NATIONS MOST COMPREHENSIVE ENVIRONMENTAL SCAN? Overview of the Project Looking Forward is an annual association environmental scanning project, conducted by Association Laboratory. It identifies critical factors affecting associations and the potential implications for association strategy. To obtain data for Looking Forward 2015, Association Laboratory conducted an online survey targeting association management personnel at various levels including chief executives and their deputies, middle managers and department directors. Consultants and suppliers to the association industry also participated. Data collection occurred in the Fall of 2014. 20 state societies of association executives, including Floridas, cooperated with Association Laboratory to expand awareness of the survey and solicit responses. This report compares results from the national sample to those of respondents based in Florida. o A whitepaper, titled Looking Forward 2015, presents the national findings; it is available at the Association Laboratory website: www.associationlaboratory.com 3 Research has identified 5 areas of concentration 60 Different Strategic Forces 64 Different Implications Association Laboratory Inc. 4 The result of a 4-year continuing process We are now starting to identify patterns. Association Laboratory Inc.

5 National Overview WHAT WERE THE MOST SIGNIFICANT BUSINESS ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS AND WHAT WERE THE PERCEIVED IMPLICATIONS FOR ASSOCIATIONS? Primary Factors Affecting Association Members 56% Managing the volume of information they receive 36% Difficulty identifying/recruiting/retaining qualified staff Managing multiple information sources 33% Keeping pace with changing personal technology 32% Increased competition among organizations within industry 32% Higher employee costs (salary/non-salary) Mergers/acquisitions/consolidation within industry 32% 30% Changing market access regulations, permits, finance rules, tax laws 29% Reduced federal government spending/investment 28% Increased federal regulatory or compliance costs 27% 0% 20% KEY Info Management Workforce Economy Global Government

40% Association Laboratory Inc. 60% 80% 100% 7 Primary Implications for Associations Meeting expectations about convenient delivery methods 79% Reduced sponsorships or contributions 77% Lower meeting or event attendance 77% Reduced member financial engagement 77% Customizing content for different audiences 76% Meeting expectations about information quality 75% More limited ability to pay for/attend development/training activities 74% Lower member time commitment 74% Creating compelling professional development/training programs 73% Lower member retention 73% 0%

20% 40% Association Laboratory Inc. 60% 80% 100% 8 Who Responded? HOW DID THE FLORIDA RESPONDENT GROUP COMPARE TO THE NATIONAL RESPONSE? Distribution of Responses by Job Title/Level, Florida vs. National 60% 52% 50% 44% 40% 30% 20% 20% 13% 11% 10% 7% 0% i oc s As on ti a ff sta f ie ch

offi ce AM r/ C E e tiv u c xe D or ct e ir ex t an ist s As e e tiv u c r di ec 8% 8% OO C r/ to om d or

ni e S ai n e ex 12% e tiv u c ( O, F C i oc s As CM O, on ati c.) t e ff sta g kin r wo 7% 6% in a

m do c cifi e sp ai n ar ea e ss s e sin u B i ce rv 2% 2% er id v o pr er id v o pr M r so g tin e e bi hi x

e e vic r e ss n tio te Ho Total 2014 Florida , ty r e op r lP 2% l te o H ai Ch n e nu e rV e h ot r o l Sa es Distribution of Responses by Job Function, Florida vs. National 60% 50%

46% 48% 40% 32% 30% 29% 26% 21% 20% 21% 17% 17% 13% 10% 0% m Ad a str i in n tio ff ta s c cifi e p ns o (n ar Bo d ip sh r

e ad e l m em be & na di r o co n) o ti rl e te un l vo r e th o r ro e rm e ad a an m ge m Co m t en

i ca n u i bl u P s/ n tio el r c s on ti a ti ca u Ed 10% 9% 10% on e nc a Fin c ,a g tin n u co m rn e v Go Total 2014 t,

en Florida l gu e r 14% 12% y or at ai aff rs M a g tin e rk M ee 21% 24% 19% 17% e nc e er nf o c s/ g tin 13% pl

g in n an M em ip sh r be er Op s on ti a Distribution of Supplier Responses by Area of Business Focus, Florida vs. National 80% 70% 70% 63% 60% 50% 40% 20% 20% 19% A dm is in n tio rt a (n s on cs

ifi c pe ff ta s er d lea & 10% 9% 10% 6% 0% p hi 20% 10% 10% co 30% 28% 30% n tio a n di or ) Ad in tis r ve

Co m m g u tio ca i n / ns Pu on le ati r ic bl Co t en nt s lo ve e d pm d an t en s di 2% 2% n

tio u b tri es iti v ti ac o Gl n l, i a b rn te l na o ati Total nm er v Go Florida 10% 10% 10% 6% 4% en u eg ,t r s air ff ya

or t la M g tin e k ar M g tin ee n co / s ce en r fe n an l p g in O on ati r pe 6% s Pu b n tio a lic s

Distribution of Responses by Type of Organization Represented, Florida vs. National 50% 45% 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% 44% 38% 29% 29% 17% 13% 6% 2% Total 2014 Florida Florida 12% 50% 2% 12% 19% 5% Distribution of Responses by Scope of Constituency Served, Florida vs. National Total 2014 8% 45% 3% 11%

27% 6% Global US + International US only Regional (multi-state or multi-province) State or provincial Local (city or metropolitan area) Distribution of Responses by Organizations Current Annual Budget, Florida 5.00% 2.00% 2.00% 14.00% 5.00% 2.00% 5.00% 10.00% 29.00% 26.00% Less than $500,000 $4 million to $4,999,999 $500,000 to $999,999 $5 million to $9,999,999 $1 million to $1,999,999 $10 million to $14,999,999 $2 million to $2,999,999 $15 million to $19,999,999 $3 million to $3,999,999 I don't know Distribution of Responses by Organizations Size of Membership, Florida 9.90% 9.90% 23.76% 39.60% 16.83%

1 to 99 100 to 499 500 to 999 1,000 to 9,999 10,000 to 99,999 Economic Situation WHAT ARE THE PRIMARY ECONOMIC ISSUES AND THEIR IMPLICATIONS FOR ASSOCIATIONS IN FLORIDA? Anticipated Economic Conditions Facing Association Members in 2015, Florida vs. National 10% Somewhat worse 9% 21% About the same 43% 60% Somewhat better 43% 10% Much better 5% Total 2014 Florida Economic Circumstances with the Greatest Expected Impact on Members in 2015, Florida vs. National 10% 12% New, nontraditional or alternatively trained individuals competing for positions 40% Increased competition among organizations within the industry 32% 31% 32%

Higher employee costs (salary/non-salary) 15% Increased cost of/or limited availability of raw materials 9% 10% 10% Difficulty gaining access to financing or other capital (by employing organizations) 33% Mergers, acquisitions or consolidation within the industry 30% 21% Reduced federal government spending or other investment 28% 25% 24% Reduced state/provincial government spending or other investment 0% Total 2014 5% Florida 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% 45% Respondent Concerns About the Impact of Economic Circumstances on Members, Florida vs. National 38% Increased reliance on competing associations

48% 33% 35% Movement toward consolidation of associations 52% 52% Reduced sale of educational product 60% 59% Reduced advertising sales or publication subscriptions 79% 77% Reduced sponsorships or contributions Reduced exhibitor sales 73% 61% 52% 56% Greater demand for webinars or other forms of online participation 79% 77% Lower meeting or event attendance 29% 32% Members choosing to participate in the local chapter instead of national association activities 65% 67% Reduced volunteer leader engagement 71% 74% Lower member time commitment 77% 77% Reduced member financial engagement 56%

Reduced member acquisition 66% 73% 73% Lower member retention 0% 10% Total 2014 Florida 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% Government Affairs WHAT ARE THE PRIMARY GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS ISSUES AND THEIR IMPLICATIONS FOR ASSOCIATIONS IN FLORIDA? Government Actions with Greatest Expected Impact on Members in 2015, Florida vs. National 10% Increased efforts to collect more revenue from non-profit organizations 12% Federal government inaction or deadlocks on key issues 19% Restrictions on government participation in meetings, membership or professional development 19% 29% 17%

Increased federal regulatory or compliance costs 27% 17% 18% Increased state/provincial regulatory or compliance costs Increased local regulatory or compliance costs 17% 10% 13% Increased federal oversight of the industry/profession 22% 19% 19% Increased state/provincial oversight of the industry/profession 17% Substantial changes in federal laws or regulations 24% Substantial changes in state/provincial laws or regulations 31% 24% Substantial changes in local laws or regulations 10% 0% Total 25% Florida 5% 10% 15% 15% 20% 25%

30% 35% Respondent Concerns About the Impact of Government Actions on Members, Florida vs. National 66% 70% 60% 54% 40% 30% 40% 60% 56% 51% 50% 66% 58% 50% 40% 40% 31% 38% 40% 31% 25% 20% 10% 1% 0% Total Florida 2%

Technology WHAT ARE THE PRIMARY TECHNOLOGY ISSUES AND THEIR IMPLICATIONS FOR ASSOCIATIONS IN FLORIDA? Information Problems with the Greatest Expected Impact on Members in 2015, Florida vs. National Implementing or integrating cloud based technology systems 10% 12% 27% Developing mobile communication and content strategy 22% 29% Pressures on technology infrastructure (failing systems, increased cyber-attacks, etc.) 26% 21% Finding and evaluating relevant communities/networks to discuss professional/industry information 17% 37% Keeping pace with rapidly changing personal technology 32% 29% Managing the receipt of information through different devices 21% 33% 33% Managing multiple information sources 54% 56% Managing the volume of information they receive 15% 17% Difficulty finding information relevant to their problems, concerns or needs 0% Total 2014 Florida 10%

20% 30% 40% 50% 60% Respondent Concerns About the Impact of Information Problems on Members, Florida vs. National 77% Creating or managing the association's social media strategy 70% 71% 76% Customizing content for different audiences Providing relevant, useful information to components (chapters, SIGs, etc.) 54% 57% Protecting intellectual property or other proprietary content/services 56% 55% 58% 52% Competing with self-organizing groups of individuals without defined organizational affiliation in delivering relevant information 56% 51% Competing with our own members in delivering relevant information 56% Competing with other associations to provide relevant information 67% 54% 58% Competing with for-profit organizations to provide relevant information 85% 79% Meeting members' expectations regarding convenient methods of information delivery Managing the 24/7 flow of information

67% 71% Distributing information for use on different or multiple devices 65% 70% 77% Difficulty distributing information through multiple delivery channels 0% Total 2014 Florida 70% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% Workforce WHAT ARE THE PRIMARY WORKFORCE ISSUES AND THEIR IMPLICATIONS FOR ASSOCIATIONS IN FLORIDA? Workforce Factors with the Greatest Expected Impact on Members in 2015, Florida vs. National 13% None of these 8% 10% Customer or public confusion over the credibility of different credentials 13% 27% Meeting compensation expectations 24%

12% Meeting staff expectations for technology support 11% 25% Managing a multigenerational workforce 26% 17% Competing with professionals from other professions or industries 14% 12% Competing with other industries/professions for qualified staff 15% 17% Matching staff/their own skills to organizational needs 14% 13% Challenges in creating an attractive career path (for staff) 20% 19% Problems meeting staff training or professional development needs 14% 44% Difficulty identifying, recruiting or retaining qualified staff 0% 36% 5% 10% Total 2014 15% Florida 20% 25%

30% 35% 40% 45% 50% Respondent Concerns About the Impact of Workforce Factors on Members, Florida vs. National 56% Differentiating the value of the association's education or credentialing products 65% 46% Configuring and pricing education or credentialing products 53% 50% 55% Bundling professional development/training resources or discounts into membership 48% Providing access to a la carte professional development/training options 56% 35% 39% Providing employment benchmarking information for member organizations/members 77% Developing different marketing strategies to address diverse audiences 71% 62% 64% Producing professional development/training to serve diverse audiences 54% Improving public perceptions of member organizations'/members' competence or credibility 63% 52% Supporting member companies/members' employment or career track development goals/goals 60%

63% Providing professional development/training through multiple delivery channels 70% 67% Creating compelling professional development/training programs 73% 63% Members'/organizations' more limited ability to pay for and attend professional development/training activities 74% 56% Members'/organizations' reduced commitment to professional development/training activities 0% Total 2014 Florida 63% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% Global WHAT ARE THE PRIMARY GLOBAL ISSUES AND THEIR IMPLICATIONS FOR ASSOCIATIONS IN FLORIDA? Global Issues with the Greatest Expected Impact on Members in 2015, Florida vs. National 43% None of these 44% 29% Changing market access regulations, permits, finance rules or taxation laws

29% 10% Changing government leadership in emerging economies 9% 10% Disruption caused by trade or other extra-governmental sanctions 7% 16% Members/Clients' members adversely impacted by competition from other countries 10% 24% Members/Clients' members increasing their global or international activity 16% 0% 5% Total 2014 10% Florida 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% 45% 50% Respondent Concerns About the Impact of Global Issues on Members, Florida vs. National 38% Developing local delivery mechanisms for the association's value proposition 36% 31%

Managing multi-cultural (and multi-lingual) Board or Committees 20% 17% Working with international standards committees or work groups 20% 15% Identifying, recruiting or retaining staff/consultants with global competence 20% 27% Developing and maintaining operational systems that support global activity 24% 23% Maintaining volunteer leadership and member support for global activity 26% 29% Incorporating non-US members or stakeholders into the association 24% 27% Supporting members in their global responsibilities 25% 25% 24% Identifying opportunities and developing association activities or initiatives in other countries 19% Managing use of non-US social media (ex: Orkut - Brazil or Renren - China) 13% 25% 26% Creating successful partnerships or coalitions with associations from other countries 33% 32% Educating members on the changing global business/professional environment 0% 5%

Total 2014 Florida 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% Florida associations generally showed more concern for international/global issues. Florida respondents viewed the most important issues as competition and consolidation within industries as well as strategies for addressing diverse audiences. 34 ONLINE Twitter: @associationlab www.associationlaboratory.com WASHINGTON, DC Suite 700 1444 I Street, NW Washington, DC 20005 Telephone: 202-216-9675 Association Laboratory Inc. 2014 CHICAGO, IL Suite 850 35 East Wacker Drive Chicago, IL 60601 Telephone: 312-224-2626

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