WELCOME MELBOURNE ALUMNI TO OUR SEMINAR Superfoods or

WELCOME MELBOURNE ALUMNI TO OUR SEMINAR Superfoods or

WELCOME MELBOURNE ALUMNI TO OUR SEMINAR Superfoods or Supermyths? Presented by Associate Professor Tim Crowe School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences Deakin University 2 March 2016 Deakin University CRICOS Provider Code: 00113B

ON TODAYS MENU What is behind the branding of foods as super? Superfood wins and fails Top foods to consume Tips for a varied diet Deakin University CRICOS Provider Code: 00113B WHAT IS A SUPERFOOD? A food with a high phytonutrient content (e.g. antioxidants, fibre, selenium, omega-3s etc.) that may offer health benefits

No legal definition Has no meaning among nutrition scientists More an over-used marketing tool Deakin University CRICOS Provider Code: 00113B COCONUT OIL: THE MAGIC ELIXIR Deakin University CRICOS Provider Code: 00113B COMMON SUPERFOODS

Blueberries Pomegranates Wheatgrass Goji Noni Mangosteen Aai Chia seeds Deakin University CRICOS Provider Code: 00113B Broccoli

Garlic Pumpkin seeds Tea Soy Coconut oil Spirulina Quinoa GOJI Claims they have the highest level of vitamin C of all plants (up to 500 times an orange!) 18 amino acids

Life extension claims Can interfere with blood-clotting medications and increase bleeding risk Deakin University CRICOS Provider Code: 00113B WHEATGRASS Claims: Blood cleanser and detoxifier attributed to the 'natural plant enzymes and the chlorophyll content Common claim that a shot is equivalent to a kilogram of

vegetables is a complete myth Floret of broccoli, or tablespoon of spinach, contain more folate and vitamin C than 30 mL of wheatgrass juice Chlorophyll not absorbed by the body, requires sunlight for activation, and its supposed high levels are no higher than other green vegetables Deakin University CRICOS Provider Code: 00113B ACAI Cherry-sized purple berry fruit of the acai palm Lab studies suggest it may have anti-cancer and antiinflammatory effects, as well as a possible use in treating heart disease

Limited human studies on its health effects It is a poster child of the power of the Internet to promote products for which only limited phytochemical and pharmacological information is available Heinrich M et al. Phytochemistry Letters 2011;4:10-21 Deakin University CRICOS Provider Code: 00113B OATS VS QUINOA Kilojoules USDA National Nutrient Database

www.ars.usda.gov Deakin University CRICOS Provider Code: 00113B Protein Fat Carbohydrat e Fibre Minerals Gluten-free Complete protein

Oats 1634 kJ 17 g 7g 66 g Quinoa 1546 kJ 11 g

Simil ar ? No 7g Similar 14 g 6g 64 g

Yes Yes ANTIOXIDANTS Total antioxidant capacity (TAC) measured using ORAC (oxygen radical absorbance capacity) test Wu et al. J Agric Food Chem. 2004;52:40264037 Deakin University CRICOS Provider Code: 00113B

AN APPLE A DAY Deakin University CRICOS Provider Code: 00113B WHY BUY THEM? Superfruit juices contain a range of nutrients, but marketing spin vastly exaggerates their health benefits Typically sold at high cost through multi-level marketing Until better scientific evidence arises, cheaper and wiser to get antioxidants from traditional fruit and vegetable sources Since July 2007, marketing of products as superfoods is prohibited

in the EU unless accompanied by a specific medical claim supported by credible scientific research Deakin University CRICOS Provider Code: 00113B TOP FOODS TO CONSUME Literally thousands of natural chemicals in foods that can affect our health There is no one superfood Think super diets instead Rather than focus on the effect of a single nutrient, focus on the total effect of food to health

Deakin University CRICOS Provider Code: 00113B 10. YOGHURT Great source of calcium Low in fat and high quality protein Source of good bacteria Reduced-fat yoghurt may have more calories than regular yoghurt check the labels! Deakin University CRICOS Provider Code: 00113B 9. TOMATOES Contain a powerful antioxidant lycopene

Found in red/orange coloured fruit and veggies May offer protection against prostate cancer Cooking makes the lycopene more available to the body (especially with a small amount of oil) Deakin University CRICOS Provider Code: 00113B 8. SOY High-quality protein Contains isoflavones that have weak estrogen activity Soy protein found to lower LDL-cholesterol

Lower breast cancer risk and good for postmenopausal symptoms??? Better evidence for soy than isoflavone supplements Deakin University CRICOS Provider Code: 00113B 7. DARK CHOCOLATE Dark chocolate has typically 2-3 times more cocoa as milk chocolate Rich source of flavanols which are potent antioxidants Clinical trials show it can: blood pressure oxidation of LDL-cholesterol

blood flow Improve the action of insulin Regular eaters of cocoa-containing foods have lower rates of heart disease Deakin University CRICOS Provider Code: 00113B 6. FISH High in omega-3 fatty acids Good sources: salmon, herring, sardines and capsules Edible bones for calcium Offers protection against:

Heart disease (stops blood from clotting, improves heart beat rhythm, lower blood fats) Rheumatoid arthritis (anti-inflammatory) Mental health: depression, ADHD Dementia, Alzheimers Deakin University CRICOS Provider Code: 00113B 5. BERRIES Includes blueberries, blackberries, cranberries, raspberries, strawberries and even goji and acai berries Fibre

High in antioxidants and polyphenols Three servings per week linked with a lower risk of heart attacks Deakin University CRICOS Provider Code: 00113B 4. TEA Rich in flavonoids (a class of polyphenols that have antioxidant activity) May slow cancer growth and lower heart disease Black and green tea are both good, though greater evidence for green tea for heart disease

Some evidence of anti-depressant effects Good source of water Deakin University CRICOS Provider Code: 00113B 3. NUTS AND SEEDS High in good mono- and polyunsaturated fat High in vitamin E Good source of fibre and protein Associated with favourable body weight outcomes Linked with heart disease and diabetes protection Deakin University CRICOS Provider Code: 00113B

2. OATS Good source of protein and B-group vitamins Low in fat Great source of fibre for keeping blood sugar and cholesterol levels under control Help with feelings of fullness after a meal Deakin University CRICOS Provider Code: 00113B 1. CRUCIFEROUS VEGETABLES Broccoli, cauliflower, turnips,

Brussels sprouts, kale, bok choy, cabbage, and radishes Broccoli: vitamins A, C, B group, and fibre Potent cancer protection: inactivate cancer-causing molecules and act as antioxidants Deakin University CRICOS Provider Code: 00113B TIPS FOR FOOD VARIETY There are over 50 different types of fruits and vegetables available any time of the year

Go nuts for nuts Choose recipes with lots of ingredients Alternate your breakfasts Deakin University CRICOS Provider Code: 00113B FOOD VARIETY CHALLENGE How many different foods do you eat each day? 30 is the target The average Australian eats between 15 and 18

Deakin University CRICOS Provider Code: 00113B www.facebook.com/ thinkingnutrition www.thinkingnutrition.co m.au @CroweTim [email protected] Deakin University CRICOS Provider Code: 00113B QUESTIONS Presented by

Tim Crowe 2 March 2016 Deakin University CRICOS Provider Code: 00113B

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