Robert Frost The Road not Taken Lesson Objective/s

Robert Frost  The Road not Taken Lesson Objective/s

Robert Frost The Road not Taken Lesson Objective/s To develop an understanding of the destination of The Road Not Taken To be able to discuss Frosts literal and figurative ideas. Outcomes: To write a short summary of each stanza To write a short comment on the destination of the poem your interpretation of potential meanings.

Robert Lee Frost (March 26, 1874 January 29, 1963) was an American poet. He is highly regarded for his realistic depictions of rural life and his command of American colloquial speech. His work frequently employed settings from rural life in New England in the early twentieth century, using them to examine complex social and philosophical themes. We will look at ten poems most of them are from his early collections. The main themes that we will encounter in his poems are: Nature, Death, Fate and Futility

Fate: something that unavoidably befalls a person; fortune; lot: It is always his fate to be left behind. .that which is inevitably predetermined; destiny: Death is our ineluctable fate. Futility the quality of being futile; ineffectiveness; uselessness. .a trifle or frivolity: the large collection of futilities that clutter our minds. a futile act or event. Activity One: I would like you, in your groups, to

read the stanzas and write a sentence down that sums up what is literally happening in each stanza. Write your sentence beside each stanza in your anthology. Robert Frost The Road not Taken Lesson Objective/s To develop an understanding of the destination of The Road Not Taken To be able to discuss Frosts literal and figurative ideas.

Outcomes: To write a short summary of each stanza To write a short comment on the destination of the poem your interpretation of potential meanings. Activity Two: Blast Discuss the images in each stanza: Stanza one Discuss each prompt and be ready to report back in three minutes.

The significance of a yellow wood. Why is he sorry? Why does he stand and look for a long time? What might the fork represent? Activity Two: Blast Discuss the images in each stanza: Stanza two Discuss each prompt and be ready to report back in three minutes.

What differences are there in the roads described? What reason does he give for his choice of road? Activity Two: Blast Discuss the images in each stanza: Stanza three Discuss each prompt and be ready to report back in three minutes. How does he describe each road in the opening two lines? What does this emphasise? He says that he marked the first road for another day but doubts he will come back. Why might this be?

Activity Two: Blast Discuss the images in each stanza: Stanza four Discuss each prompt and be ready to report back in three minutes. Why when he re-tells this story later in life will he do it with a sigh? What does he think has made all the difference? And what do you think that difference is? Do you see a sense of irony in the last stanza? Activity Three Interpretations. Two Statements three minutes on each please. I will choose two

people to discuss. Some critics see this poem as message to seize the day. Or, to avoid the easy route in life, e.g. those who dare in life win! How far do you agree? Some philosophers suggest that there is: No right path to take in our life, just the chosen path and the other one. To what extent does this poem adhere to this thinking. Potential themes and interpretations?

Nature, Death, Fate and Futility In your groups come up with a short interpretation of the poem that supports one of the above themes. I will be asking all groups to speak and justify their ideas.

Recently Viewed Presentations

  • Animal Diversity - Edl

    Animal Diversity - Edl

    Animalia. Kingdom extends far beyond dogs, birds, and humans - vast array of diversity covers 1.3 million animal species - definition is not straight forward because of exceptions to every criterion
  • A Special Big Brother, Shirley Temple and the

    A Special Big Brother, Shirley Temple and the

    Mt. Rushmore - early 1930's. Shirley Temple and First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, June 1938. ... an active Polio support group for the community. They. which includes numerous members. called their group "Polio Plus" in an effort to include .
  • Tuition fees and access to higher education

    Tuition fees and access to higher education

    Tuition fees and access to higher education John Rushforth Deputy Director ... LSE and the Centre for the Economics of Education) and Anna Vignoles (Institute of Education and Centre for the Economics of Education). ... Bursary levels for students eligible...
  • Leading people for results The CRA HR Modernization journey

    Leading people for results The CRA HR Modernization journey

    Vision à long terme pour les RH. Même si nous continuons à planifier pour l'effectif de l'Agence et pour les affaires de la DGRH sur un horizon de 1 à 3 ans, il y a un certain nombre de moteurs...
  • Develop Strategies for Overcoming Lack of Supporting ...

    Develop Strategies for Overcoming Lack of Supporting ...

    DS becomes: Draft DS, Review DS, Edit DS, Review DS, Edit DS, Approve DS. ... Now we see which part of the specs each group is responsible for. ... Develop Strategies for Overcoming Lack of Supporting Documentation for Compliance of...
  • Data Mining: Concepts and Techniques  Slides for Textbook

    Data Mining: Concepts and Techniques Slides for Textbook

    Compressed sparse array addressing: (chunk_id, offset) Compute aggregates in "multiway" by visiting cube cells in the order which minimizes the # of times to visit each cell, and reduces memory access and storage cost.
  • Making a Play in the NCAA

    Making a Play in the NCAA

    NAIA. National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics. Association for smaller schools. Almost all NAIA schools offer athletic scholarships. Texas examples: Jarvis Christian College, University of Houston - Victoria, Wayland Baptist University, and Texas Wesleyan!
  • by Milagros Santos-Ong Director, Library Services Supreme Court

    by Milagros Santos-Ong Director, Library Services Supreme Court

    GOVERNMENT STRUCTURE c) American period (1898-1946) Treaty of Paris on December 10, 1898 Constitution on February 8, 1935, signed by U.S. President Franklin Delano Roosevelt on March 23, 1935 and ratified at a plebiscite held on May 14, 1935.