Preparation - Missouri EduSAIL

Preparation - Missouri EduSAIL

Professional Development to Practice Developing Assessment Capable Learners Part 2: Where Am I Now? The contents of this presentation were developed under a grant from the US Department of Education to the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (#H323A120018). However, these contents do not necessarily represent the policy of the US

Professional Development to Practice Acknowledgements Special thanks to all contributors to the development and revision of this module. The original collection of learning packages was rolled-out for use by Regional Professional Development Center (RPDC) Consultants in July 2013 after being developed by a team of content experts. The collection of learning packages was developed through efforts funded by the Missouri State Personnel Development Grant (SPDG). The following individual/groups are thanked immensely for their hard work in developing this package. Content Development and Revision Support UMKC Institute for Human Development Ronda Jenson, Director Arden Day

Stefanie Lindsay Carla Williams Jodi Arnold SPDG Management Team The contents of this presentation were developed under a grant from the US Department of Education to the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (#H323A120018). However, these contents do not necessarily represent the policy of the US Professional Development to Practice

Initial Content Development Team, 2013 Mary Richter, Team Leader, MO SW-PBS Ginger Henry, DESE Winona Anderson, South Central RPDC Amy King, Kansas City RPDC Julie Blaine, Central RPDC Debbie Litner, Southeast RPDC Deb Childs, MO SW-PBS Jana Loge, Southwest RPDC Janet Crafton, South Central RDPC Kris Luginbill, Southwest RPDC Susan Feeback, Central RPDC Robert Rethemeyer, Central RPDC

Diane Feeley, MO SW-PBS Patty Wilmes, Northwest RPDC Doug Hatridge, Central RPDC Liz Condray, South Central RPDC (Enhancent, 14) 2016 Revision Team Nancy Steele, Facilitator, NE SIS Alan Bancroft, C RPDC Beverly Colombo, StL RPDC Ginger Henry, DESE

Bev Kohzadi, C RPDC Stephanie Kuper, SE RPDC Lori Ladwig, NE RPDC Sarah Spence, C SIS Terri Steffes, Hook Center The contents of this presentation were developed under a grant from the US Department of Education to the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary

Education (#H323A120018). However, these contents do not necessarily represent the policy of the US Professional Development to Practice Opening & Introductions The contents of this presentation were developed under a grant from the US Department of Education to the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (#H323A120018). However, these contents do not necessarily represent the policy of the US

Professional Development to Practice Developing Assessment Capable Learners Professional Development to Practice nt e m s s e

s As e l b a Cap ers n r : a y e

f L ti n e d i can I m A re

e h 1. W g? I Goin m A re e h 2. W ? Now an I ?

C ow Gap H . 3 e h t e Clos Professional Development to Practice

Professional Development to Practice Hatties Barometer of Influence Medium (Hattie, 2009) Professional Development to Practice Assessment Capable Learners (Self-Reported Grades) (1.33 effect size)

(Hattie, 2015) Professional Development to Practice Missouri Teacher Standards Standard 1: Content knowledge aligned with appropriate instruction. Standard 2: Student Learning, Growth and Development Standard 6: Effective Communication Standard 7: Student Assessment and Data Analysis

(Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, 2013) Professional Development to Practice Session-at-a-Glance Review and reflect Part 1 Discover strategies for teachers and students Where Am I Now? A look at effective feedback A look at self-assessment

Use evidence of student learning to determine next steps in teaching Professional Development to Practice Learning Targets I can reflect on/discuss how I helped students know Where I am going?. I can identify and implement characteristics of effective feedback. I can teach students to selfassess accurately with a focus on learning targets.

I can implement strategies that maximize the impact of student self assessment and goal setting. Professional Development to Practice Essential Questions Why is it important to have students identify Where am I going? and Where am I now?? How can I utilize effective feedback to help students identify Where am I now? How can I help students assess and identify Where am I now?

How can we use a combination of strategies to promote assessment capable learners? Professional Development to Practice Norms Begin and end on time. Be an engaged participant. Be an active listeneropen to new ideas. Use notes for side bar conversations. Use electronics respectfully. Professional Development to Practice

Developing Assessment Capable Learners Part 2: Where Am I Now? The contents of this presentation were developed under a grant from the US Department of Education to the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (#H323A120018). However, these contents do not necessarily represent the policy of the US Professional Development to Practice

Teacher Strategies for Developing Assessment Capable Learners To help students know where they are going, I need to: 1. Provide clear and understandable vision of the learning target. 2. Use examples and models of strong and weak work. To help students know where they are now, I need to: 3. Offer regular descriptive feedback. 4. Teach students to self-assess and set goals. To help students know how to close the gap, I need to:

5. Use evidence of student learning needs to determine next steps in teaching. 6. Design focused instruction, followed by practice with feedback. 7. Provide students opportunities to track, reflect on, and share their learning progress. (Chappuis, 2015) Professional Development to Practice Questions Students Need to Answer Where am I going?

1. I know what I am supposed to be learning and it makes sense to me. 2. I know what quality work looks like. Where am I now? 3. It is clear to me what I am doing well and what I need to do next. 4. I self-assess and set my own learning goals. How can I close the gap? 5. I know what the next step is for my learning. 6. I rework, refine, and revise my work to reach my learning target. 7. I reflect on my work and keep track of my progress in order to share my learning with others.

(Chappuis, 2009) Professional Development to Practice Use of These Strategies Is Not Linear Strategies 1 through 3, provide a clear picture of where we are going. Strategy 4 and Strategy 7, explain where we want our students to arrive. Strategies 5 and 6, can happen at any time and often use Strategies 1-4 as part of the lessons. (Chappuis, 2015)

Professional Development to Practice Indispensable Conditions for Improvement in Learning The student: comes to hold a concept of quality roughly similar to that of the teacher. (Where am I going?) is able to monitor continuously the quality of work produced during the act of production. (Where am I now?) has a repertoire of alternative learning strategies

to employ when faced with incomplete mastery. (How can I close the gap?) (Sadler, 1989) Professional Development to Practice Todays Focus: Where Am I Now? Strategy 3: How do you (or could you) offer feedback to students? Strategy 4: How do you (or could you) teach students to self-assess and set goals?

Professional Development to Practice Where Am I Now? To help students know where they are now, I need to: 3. Offer regular descriptive feedback. 4. Teach students to self-assess and set goals each day. Pair up with another person. One person read about strategy 3. One person read about strategy 4. Both readers highlight important points from the reading. Come together and share information about your strategy. (Chappuis, 2015)

Professional Development to Practice Unpacking the Topic Where Am I Now? Strategy 3: Offer Regular Descriptive Feedback The contents of this presentation were developed under a grant from the US Department of Education to the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (#H323A120018). However, these contents do not necessarily represent the policy of the US

Professional Development to Practice Learning Outcomes Feedback Understand the power of effective feedback as it relates to student learning and instructional practices. Recognize and apply meaningful, descriptive/ actionable feedback. Develop an awareness of Hatties and Timperleys three important levels of feedback: task, process, and selfregulation.

Professional Development to Practice Feedback (0.73 effect size) (Hattie, 2015) Professional Development to Practice Definition of Feedback Feedback is defined as: information provided by an agent (e.g. teacher, peer, book, parent, self,

experience) regarding aspects of ones performance or understanding. (Hattie & Timperley, 2007, p. 81) Professional Development to Practice Benefits of Feedback According to James Pennebaker, Students must be given access to information about their performance. At the broadest level, students need to know if they actually have mastered the

material or not. Giving them feedback about the ways they are studying, reading, searching for information, or answering questions can be invaluable. (Stenger, 2014) Professional Development to Practice Purpose of Feedback The main purpose of feedback is to reduce discrepancies between current understanding or performance and some desired level of performance or goal.

Current Understan ding GAP Desired Level of Performan ce (Hattie & Timperley, 2007)

Professional Development to Practice Setting the Stage for Descriptive Feedback Developing a safe, collaborative and constructive classroom for receiving/giving descriptive feedback. Professional Development to Practice Classroom Climate is Critical Students are active participants as

individuals and as members of collaborative groups. A safe, healthy and supportive environment can develop compassion and mutual respect. Efficient classroom management promotes comfort, order and appropriate student behavior. Learning is a process where risks are (Hattie & Timperley, 2007) encouraged and mistakes are a natural part Professional Development to Practice

The goal of effective classroom management is not creating perfect children, but providing the perfect environment for enhancing their growth, using research-based strategies that guide students toward increasingly responsible and motivated behavior. (Sprick, Knight, Reinke & McKale, 2006, p. 185) Professional Development to Practice Video

An Introduction to Effective Classroom Practices Michael Kennedy (n.d.) Professional Development to Practice Unpacking the Topic Effective Feedback The contents of this presentation were developed under a grant from the US Department of Education to the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (#H323A120018). However, these contents

do not necessarily represent the policy of the US Professional Development to Practice Characteristics of Effective Feedback Less teaching + more feedback = better learning (Wiggins, 2016, p. 24) Professional Development to Practice

Seven Keys to Effective Feedback 1. Goalreferenced 2. Tangible and transparent 3. Actionable 4. User friendly 5. Timely 6. Ongoing 7. Consistent (Wiggins, 2012) Professional Development to Practice

Jigsaw Number off 1-7 All 1s, 2s, 3s get together All 1s become experts on Goalreferenced, all 2s become experts on Tangible and transparent, etc. Come back to your table and share your expert knowledge to your table mates. Professional Development to Practice Effective Feedback

Helps all students answer these three questions. 1. Where am I going? (What are my learning intentions?) 2. How am I going? (What does the evidence tell me?) 3. Where to next? (What learning activities should I do to make better progress?) (Chappuis, 2009) (Hattie & Timperley, 2007)

Professional Development to Practice Goldilocks Principle Not too much, not too little, but just right. Professional Development to Practice Descriptive Feedback Descriptive feedback provides information to students and teachers about learning. It helps to reduce the gap between the students

current level of understanding and/or performance and a desired goal. Depending on the nature and delivery of the feedback, it can have powerful positive effects on student learning and engagement. (Hattie & Timperley, 2007) Professional Development to Practice Types of Feedback Descriptive/ Actionable Provided specific

information in the form of written comments or conversations Helps the learner understand what he or she needs to do to improve Is a crucial part of formative assessment Evaluative Tell learners how they compare to others

Provides a judgment summarizing the quality of the learning Assigning a grade or a quantitative score to the work (Wiggins, 2016) Professional Development to Practice Descriptive or Evaluative?

Professional Development to Practice Why Exemplary? 1. Look at each of the exemplars of descriptive feedback on the handout. 2. Work with a partner to identify why each is exemplary? 3. Share with the group. Professional Development to Practice Descriptive feedback is the most powerful tool for improving

student learning. (Black, Harrison, Marshall, Wiliam & Lee 2003) Professional Development to Practice Unpacking the Topic Three Levels of Feedback The contents of this presentation were developed under a grant from the US Department of Education to the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

(#H323A120018). However, these contents do not necessarily represent the policy of the US Department of Education, and you Professional Development to Practice What is the most effective kind of feedback to give to students? Depends on the level of learning Feedback Professional Development to Practice 3 Levels of Feedback

Task Level: How well tasks are understood and performed Process Level: The main process needed to understand/perform tasks (the how? rather than the what?) Self-regulation level: Self-monitoring, directing, and regulating of actions (Higgins, 2014) Professional Development to Practice My Feedback Practices As a Teacher My

Yes Partially No 1 Feedback includes three components: what was done well, what needs improvement, and specific suggestions for how to improve. 2 The timing of my feedback (oral or written) provides students opportunities to use the information while they are still learning and practicing the requisite knowledge and skills. 3 Feedback relates to the learning goals(s) which I shared and clarified with students at the outset of the learning cycle. (Reach Every Student, Ontario 2010, p. 16)

Professional Development to Practice Resources for Using Technology in Feedback Visit MOEDU-SAIL for resources to implement technology with feedback Professional Development to Practice Unpacking the Topic Where Am I Now? Strategy 4: Teach Students to

Self-Assess and Set Goals. The contents of this presentation were developed under a grant from the US Department of Education to the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (#H323A120018). However, these contents do not necessarily represent the policy of the US Professional Development to Practice Say Something 1. Find a partner. 2. Silently read the first paragraph of SelfAssessment Engage in Assessment. 3. Tell each other what you found new,

unexpected, or interesting. 4. Repeat the same process for the remaining paragraphs. (University of Reading, 2009) Professional Development to Practice Strategy 4: Self-Assessment Self-assessment: Students make judgments about what they know and can do. Justification: Students show evidence to support the self-assessment.

Goal Setting: Students make a plan for continued learning. (Chappuis, 2009) Professional Development to Practice Self-Assessment Readiness Part 1: Does the student have a clear vision of quality (whats expected)? Can the student describe

the intended learning? Can the student differentiate between strong and weak work? Part 2: Has the student had experience giving and offering feedback? Has the student received descriptive feedback using the language of quality, with opportunity to act on it?

Has the student practiced offering peer feedback using the language of quality? (Chappuis, 2015, p.167) Professional Development to Practice Self Assessment Tools (Chappuis, 2005) Professional Development to Practice

Students can selfassess prior to, during, and after learning (Collins, 2011) Professional Development to Practice Self-Assessment includes having students do the following: Identify their own strengths and areas for improvement. Write in a response log at the end of class, recording key points they have learned and questions they still have.

Using established criteria, select a work sample for their portfolio that proves a certain level of proficiency, explaining why the piece qualifies. Offer descriptive feedback to classmates. Use your feedback, feedback from other students, and their own self-assessment to identify what they need to work on and set goals for future learning. (Chappuis, J., Stiggins, Chappuis, S., Arter, 2012) Professional Development to Practice Unpacking the Topic Where Am I Now?

Moving forward Setting Goals The contents of this presentation were developed under a grant from the US Department of Education to the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (#H323A120018). However, these contents do not necessarily represent the policy of the US Professional Development to Practice Why Have Students Set Goals?

Goal setting helps students structure their efforts by helping them focus on the components that are important to the assignment, tracking their progress throughout, and serving as a motivator. (Schunk, 1990) In addition to setting goals, students also need concrete strategies they can use to successfully work toward their goals. Students determine which next steps to take through clarifying targets, self-assessing, and pursuing goals. (Laud, Hirsch, Wagner, and Patel, 2010)

Professional Development to Practice The teacher models how to self-assess, set goals, and plan improvements by asking: What aspect of your work was most effective? What aspect of your work was least effective? What specific action or actions will improve your performance? What will you do differently next time? (McTighe & OConnor, 2005)

Professional Development to Practice Student Goal Setting Tools (Chappuis, 2015) Professional Development to Practice Student Goal Setting Tools (Chappuis, 2015)

Professional Development to Practice Assessment & Reflection Developing Assessment Capable Learners Where Am I Now? The contents of this presentation were developed under a grant from the US Department of Education to the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (#H323A120018). However, these contents do not necessarily represent the policy of the US Professional Development to Practice

Where Am I Now? Professional Development to Practice What Do You Already Do? Strategies 3 and 4 Make a list of practices you plan to implement for each strategy based on your learning from today. Strategy My Practice/Activity

3: Offer regular and descriptive feedback. 4: Teach students to self-assess and set goals Set goals (Chappuis, 2015) Professional Development to Practice When we have made the learning clear to students, focused instruction on the intended

learning, offered practice opportunities targeted to learning needs, offered feedback on students learning strengths and needs, and taught them how to self-assess and set goals, we are inches away from students taking initiative to determine what they need practice with and to create their own personalized learning path. (McTighe & OConnor, 2016) Professional Development to Practice Closing & Follow-up Developing Assessment

Capable Learners The contents of this presentation were developed under a grant from the US Department of Education to the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (#H323A120018). However, these contents do not necessarily represent the policy of the US Professional Development to Practice Practice Profile Professional Development to Practice

Self-Assessment Practice Profile Excel Workbook http:// app.missouripd.org Professional Development to Practice Next Steps: Action = Results

What steps will you take to start implementing? Professional Development to Practice Contact Information Please contact me to schedule followup coaching and/or additional professional development.

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