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WHMIS 2015 Incorporating new GHS standards Health, Safety & Environment Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment Introduction WHMIS 2015 is the newest version of WHMIS which incorporates pictograms, safety data sheets, and labels that are now standardized globally. The Global Harmonization System (GHS) has been adopted in various other countries around the world and

this is what WHMIS 2015 is now comprised of. Many things will be similar, but there are of course many differences that we need to learn about Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment Introduction While going through this presentation, dont worry about trying to memorize everything shown to you on each slide We will provide an overview at the end that highlights which things you will need to memorize, but the process of identifying hazards and protecting yourself is the main purpose of this training, as you will be expected to

implement this process for the exam, and throughout your time in the lab Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment How Do I Use GHS? Lets walk through a scenario. You need to use a chemical for one of your experiments: methanol The first thing you should do is read the Safety Data Sheet (SDS) **information on how to use the SDS database will be given in the next section**

Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment Safety Data Sheets A Safety Data Sheet (SDS) provides you with the majority of the safety information about a particular product Under WHMIS 2015, there is a standardized 16 sections, and standardized layout You might still encounter old MSDS with only 9 sections, and start seeing new SDS with the full 16 sections Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment

Safety Data Sheets All SDS will have the following sections: 1. Product identifier 11. Toxicological information 12. Ecological information 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Hazard identification

Composition / ingredients First aid measures Fire-fighting measures Accidental release measures 7. 8. 9. 10. Handling & storage Exposure controls/ personal protection Physical & chemical properties Stability & reactivity

Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment 13. 14. 15. 16. Disposal considerations Transport information Regulatory information Other information

Safety Data Sheets 1. Product identifier - this is where you find the name of the chemical, including synonyms, the name of the supplier, and an emergency contact number 2. Hazard identification this section will tell you the: Hazard classification & category Pictograms Signal word Hazard statements Precautionary statements The SDS for methanol shows us the following: Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment

2. Hazard Identification Hazard classification (class, category) Pictogram(s) & Signal word Hazard statement(s) Precautionary statement(s) Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment 2. Hazard Identification Hazard classification This tells us that: Methanol is flammable

And that it is toxic if: Ingested (oral), Inhaled, Absorbed through skin (dermal) Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment 2. Hazard Identification Hazard classification Acute toxicity even a single exposure can cause toxic effects. Damage/symptoms will appear in the short-term

Chronic toxicity repeated small exposures over the long term will show damage/symptoms in the long term (i.e.: you may not feel sick right away, but may develop health problems later on) Specific organ toxicity specific, non-lethal toxic effects on target organs that arise from a single exposure Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment 2. Hazard Identification Hazard classification The category gives us the level of severity for each classification

Within each hazard class, category 1 is the most hazardous, and category 4 is the least hazardous Category: Least Hazardous 4 Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment 3

2 1 Most Hazardous 2. Hazard Identification Pictogram & Signal word Pictogram(s) hazard symbol within a red "square set on a point". Signal word a word used to alert the reader to a potential hazard and to indicate the severity of the hazard.

Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment Pictograms Pictograms under WHMIS 2015 are used to identify the hazards associated with the material Many of the new pictograms are similar to the old WHMIS symbols, but there are a few differences All hazardous chemicals are now classified according to standards set out by the United Nations, and are consistent across all countries, instead of each country deciding how to classify chemicals on its own Human Resources

Health, Safety & Environment Pictograms Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment Pictograms Our Example The SDS shows us these pictograms for methanol: Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment

Signal Word Danger is used for the more severe hazard categories Warning is mostly used for the less severe hazards From the SDS for methanol, we can see that it is a severe hazard Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment 2. Hazard Identification Hazard statement(s) Precautionary statement(s) Note: you will not need to remember every hazard statement or

precautionary statement. You should be able to know where to find them, and understand what they mean Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment Hazard Statements Hazard statements are brief, standardized sentences that tell you more about the exact hazard of the product. They describe the most significant hazards of the product. The wording of the hazard statement helps to describe the degree of the hazard. Human Resources

Health, Safety & Environment Hazard Statements Flammability Least Hazardous Combustible Health Effects/ Damage Suspected of causing

Flammable Highly flammable Most Hazardous Extremely flammable Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment Toxicity

May be harmful Harmful May cause Toxic Causes Fatal Hazard Statements On our label we can see the keywords in the hazard statements: So clearly we can see that methanol is hazardous, and we have an idea of the

degree or severity of the hazards. Least Hazardous Flammability Combustible Health Effects/ Damage Suspected of causing

Toxicity May be harmful Flammable Harmful May cause Now we need to know how to work with it safely Most Human Resources Hazardous Health, Safety & Environment

Highly flammable Extremely flammable Toxic Causes Fatal Precautionary Statements

Precautionary statements provide advice on how to prevent adverse effects resulting from exposure, improper handling or storage. These statements can include instructions about: Storage Handling First aid Personal protective equipment Emergency measures Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment Precautionary Statements

Our SDS for methanol lists several things we must do to avoid the hazards. These statements make sense now that we know this product is flammable: keeping the product away from heat, sparks and open flames would obviously be important! Likewise, we know it is toxic, so we must make sure we do not breath the vapours, and that we always wear protective equipment Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment 3. Composition & Ingredients This section provides you with: Chemical name, common name and synonyms Chemical Abstract Service (CAS) registry number and any other unique

identifiers Chemical name of impurities, stabilizing solvents and/or additives Concentration In this case, we are working with pure methanol, but if you have a mixture, here is where you would find the concentration of each component Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment Checkpoint What should you remember from this section? The difference between chronic and acute Which is more hazardous: Category 1 or Category 4? The pictograms: be able to recognize them and identify the hazards of

each The difference between the signal words: Danger and Warning What information does the hazard statements give you? How can you gauge the severity of a hazard from the phrasing of the hazard statements? What about the precautionary statements, what information do they give you? Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment Planning Ahead While weve already identified the hazards associated with methanol, and some of the steps to take to protect ourselves, we need to look into the

SDS for more information and plan ahead for any unexpected events. The next few sections of the SDS may not be useful to you in day-to-day experiments, but its important to know the information in case something happens in the following scenarios: You or someone else has been exposed to the chemical (First Aid Measures) What can happen if the chemical burns (Firefighting Measures) What to do in case of a spill (Accidental Release Measures) Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment 4. First Aid Measures In order for a hazardous chemical to cause health effects, it must enter our

body in some way. There are 4 general routes of exposure than can occur: Absorption usually occurs via skin contact and the chemical absorbs into our body Injection the harmful chemical enters our bloodstream directly, typically this occurs when we cut ourselves with a contaminated item (like broken glass, or needles) Ingestion the harmful chemical enters our body by eating it, either directly or because of cross-contamination on hands or other items Inhalation occurs when we inhale (breathe in) vapours of the harmful chemical Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment 4. First Aid Measures

This section gives you basic instructions on what to do immediately after an exposure to this chemical. Youll note that in most cases, the SDS recommends consulting a physician. Weve already determined that methanol has some serious health effects, so it makes sense that we should see a doctor to make sure that we are going to be ok! We may also need treatments or tests that only a doctor can provide. Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment 4. First Aid Measures So why do I need to read this section before I start my experiment? Think about it like this: if you splash this chemical on your skin, are you going to

stop what youre doing, look up the SDS, and read what it says? That can take some time, and in many cases you need to act quickly if youve been exposed. The longer you take to treat an exposure, the more damage that can be done. If you already know what the first aid measures are, you can act immediately Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment 5. Fire Fighting Measures This section is mostly useful to fire fighters, but for you it may be important to know hazardous combustion products that may arise during combustion, and how to prevent a fire from occurring

Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment 5. Fire Fighting Measures Again, its important to read this section before working with a chemical, so that you can take the proper precautions to avoid dangerous situations Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment 6. Accidental Release Measures This section is provides you with methods and materials for containment

and cleaning up in case of a spill or leak Please note that more specific instructions are usually needed to clean up a spill properly, and only basic information is provided on the SDS. Also, you may not have the necessary equipment to clean up a spill (you can see that the SDS recommends wearing a respirator for example) Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment 6. Accidental Release Measures You will learn more about spill clean-up in the hands-on workshop portion of the Chem & Lab Safety Training, but the overall recommendation is always: if you dont feel comfortable, dont know how, or dont have the right equipment to clean up a spill Dont attempt to clean it up

Evacuate the areas and call Campus Security to activate the Spill Response Team and we will help! Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment 7. Handling & Storage This section is provides you with precautions for safe handling and conditions for safe storage (which includes incompatible materials when applicable) Some of these recommendations have already been identified, but a bit more detail is given in this section (and remember, methanol is just one example, every hazardous chemical will have its own handling and storage instructions)

Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment 8. Exposure Controls/Personal Protection Weve established that methanol can be harmful if it enters our body in any number of ways. Weve also learned what to do in case we get exposed, but how do we prevent an exposure? Section 8 gives you lots of information, but what does it all mean? And what should you focus on? Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment

8. Exposure Controls/Personal Protection If the chemical is something that can be an inhalation hazard, you might see a large table like this: Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment 8. Exposure Controls/Personal Protection What do these values mean? TWA Time Weighted Average STEL Short Term Exposure Limit You may also see: PEL Permissible Exposure Level TLV Threshold Limit Value

Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment 8. Exposure Controls/Personal Protection Essentially, these numbers tell you what levels can be in the air before youll start to have toxic effects. However, we dont have any way to measure if the methanol concentration in the air is above or below these levels, so they really dont help us very much! These tables are more useful to industry settings, where they have air monitors that measure the concentrations of chemicals in the air. The other information provided in this section will be much more useful to you:

Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment 8. Exposure Controls/Personal Protection Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and engineering controls will be outlined in this section: Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment 8. Exposure Controls/Personal Protection This information is very important, so lets go through it in a bit more detail:

We know that methanol is toxic if we inhale it, so we have to prevent inhalation of the vapours. One way to do this is to wear a respirator, and this first paragraph details what type you should wear. However, you probably dont have access to this kind of equipment. Why not? Because its always better to remove the hazard in the first place, rather than relying on PPE! This is called an engineering control: Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment 8. Exposure Controls/Personal Protection So, if I am able to use this chemical inside a fume hood in the lab, then I dont have to go through the process of finding a respirator

If your experiment is not going to be performed in a fume hood, then contact HSE to help you with a risk assessment and to get fitted for a proper respirator A respirator does not offer any protection unless it has been fit-tested. Please dont assume a mask/respirator you buy from the store will protect you from fumes/vapours! Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment 8. Exposure Controls/Personal Protection The next paragraph talks about hand protection: The SDS recommends wearing gloves, which makes perfect sense since we know that methanol is toxic if absorbed through our skin, and our

hands are the easiest parts of our body to come in contact with the hazardous chemical, so gloves are definitely a must! You should inspect the gloves to make sure they are not expired (check the date on the back of the box), and dont have rips or holes in them Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment 8. Exposure Controls/Personal Protection In the hands-on workshop for the Chem & Lab Safety Training, you will learn and practice the proper glove removal technique Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment

8. Exposure Controls/Personal Protection Its important to know what sort of situation your experiment requires: Are you going to need to dip your hands into the methanol at any point? Or are you only wearing gloves to protect yourself in case you accidentally spill/splash some on your hands? Youll notice that the type of glove required will often depend on what kind of contact you have to make with the chemical. HSE can help you find the right type of glove for your experiment. Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment 8. Exposure Controls/Personal Protection

The next paragraphs talk about other skin and eye contact: The SDS will always recommend the highest level of protection (the manufacturer of the chemical does not know what you are doing with the chemical, or how much of it youre going to be using). A risk assessment will help you determine what you will actually need. Typically, you wont need to wear a complete suit for most activities on campus. So again, think about what sort of processes are involved in your experiment..... Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment 8. Exposure Controls/Personal Protection

The highest hazard situation would be one where you are working with a large volume of chemical: Assess your risks in this situation: Spills would be potentially very large Youre dealing with the chemical outside of a fume hood We know methanol is very toxic, so we need to prevent ourselves from being exposed to it if the worst happens... So this might be why the SDS says to wear a complete suit

Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment 8. Exposure Controls/Personal Protection The next highest hazard situation would be one where you are working with a medium volume of chemical: Assess your risks in this situation: Spills or splashes would still be quite large Youre dealing with the chemical inside of a fume hood but you arent able to pull the glass sash down far enough to protect your face from a splash Youre dipping your hands directly into the hazardous chemical

So proper gloves, face shield, a chemical splash apron, long pants and enclosed shoes is the best level of protection Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment 8. Exposure Controls/Personal Protection The next highest hazard situation would be one where you are working with a smaller volume of chemical: Assess your risks in this situation: Spills or splashes would be quite small Youre dealing with the chemical inside a fume hood Youre able to pull the sash down far enough to

cover your face Youre not directly in contact with the chemical So disposable gloves, safety glasses, a lab coat, long pants, and enclosed shoes should give you enough protection Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment 8. Exposure Controls/Personal Protection The next paragraph in section 8 refers to Hygiene measures: This information is important to note. You might think that because you are wearing gloves, it wouldnt be necessary to wash your hands.

But remember: PPE is a last line of defense, and isnt perfect! You might still cross-contaminate yourself, or small amounts of chemical may have been able to penetrate the gloves. Washing your hands after handling the chemical, and before leaving the lab will ensure that you dont accidentally ingest traces of the hazardous chemicals that might still be on your hands. Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment Checkpoint What should you remember from this section? The 4 methods of exposure: Inhalation, Injection, Ingestion & Absorption Why should you read the First Aid section prior to using a hazardous

chemical? Will the SDS tell you everything you need to know to clean up a spill safely? Where to find the detailed PPE information The difference between using a fume hood instead of a respirator The difference between gloves for full contact and splash contact Why risk assessment is important when choosing PPE What should you always do after handling hazardous chemicals? Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment Planning the Experiment Now we know how to protect ourselves with PPE, but we still need to find

out other information and determine if the experiment/activity weve chosen to do will be safe to perform. Think about what youll be doing with the chemical: Will you be heating it? Will you be mixing it with anything else? The next two sections can give you some valuable insight.... Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment 9. Physical and Chemical Properties This section is provides you with lots of information about the properties of the material:

Some important values to note: Flash point Autoignition temperature Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment 9. Physical and Chemical Properties Flash point at this temperature, a spark can ignite the vapours in the air. The lower the flash point, the greater the hazard The flash point of methanol is only 9.7 C so the vapours are able to light on fire if there is any spark or ignition source available. This is why you want to make sure you dont use equipment nearby that will generate sparks, and why using this chemical in a fume

hood is important (the fume hood will continuously remove the vapours from the air, lowering the likelihood of a flammable environment occurring) Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment 9. Physical and Chemical Properties Autoignition temperature - is the lowest temperature at which it will spontaneously ignite without an external source of ignition, such as a flame or spark. In other words, if you need to heat the methanol, you want to make sure you dont heat it to this temperature (SDS lists it as 455 C)

If you heat it to this temperature or higher, it will light on fire even if there is no spark or ignition source! Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment 10. Stability and Reactivity This section tells you if the chemical is stable, what materials will react with it in a dangerous way, and other conditions to avoid during storage or use: Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment

10. Stability and Reactivity Some chemicals: Degrade over time and turn into very hazardous chemicals or mixtures Will start to react with air or water during storage. Will react violently with themselves if they are not kept at a certain temperature Thankfully methanol is not one of those types of chemical, as we can see that it is stable under the conditions that were recommended earlier Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment 10. Stability and Reactivity

We can also see that methanol should not be mixed with the chemicals listed under materials to avoid as they are incompatible with methanol Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment Toxicological & Ecological Info The next two sections of the SDS may not be useful for you when planning your experiment, but the information may be helpful in other ways. Section 11 Toxicological Information: Concise but complete description of the various toxic health effects and the data used to identify those effects Section 12 Ecological Information: Persistence and degradability in

the environment, bioaccumulative potential, mobility in soil Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment 11. Toxicological Information From the very beginning of the SDS, we learned that methanol is toxic. This section explains how toxic it is, and shows what data was used to make this determination Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment 11. Toxicological Information

LD50 - "Lethal Dose, 50% - is the amount of the substance required per body weight to kill 50% of the test population. Different people can experience different effects from a chemical, some people might die from a smaller dose, others may be able to survive a larger dose, so the LD50 gives us the median lethal dose as a standardized measurement of toxicity Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment 11. Toxicological Information We know that methanol is toxic if we get it on our skin or inhale it, but interestingly enough, it looks like the skin or eyes wont be damaged in

the process... or at least, not for rabbits (you cant always assume humans will react the same way as test animals) Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment 11. Toxicological Information This means that your skin might not burn or itch, and might not get red or irritated if you spill it on yourself, but it will still be able to cause toxic effects inside your body! This is another reason why washing our hands is important, you may not have any way of knowing if youve got the chemical on your skin!

Remember, this example just talks about methanol. Other chemicals are able to destroy the tissues of our eyes, skin, and lungs! So it is important to always check every section of the SDS for each chemical you use. Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment 11. Toxicological Information Germ cell mutagenicity refers to chemicals that may cause mutations in the germ cells of humans that can be transmitted to the progeny In other words, these types of chemicals can cause mutations in your sperm or eggs cells, which can then be passed down to your children Without going into too much detail about the types of testing used, it looks

like methanol hasnt been found to be a germ cell mutagen....so far. Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment 11. Toxicological Information There are chemicals that are classified as germ cell mutagens so again, always read the SDS! There may be chemicals that dont cause any immediate harm to you (i.e.: they may not be acutely toxic) but may be causing mutations to your germ cells that can be passed on to your children. In other words: you may not see any harmful effects if you are exposed to it, but it might turn out to cause harm to the children you may one day have.

Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment 11. Toxicological Information Reproductive toxicity Refers to chemicals that cause adverse effects on sexual function and fertility In other words: they may interfere with your sexual function, hormones, or your ability to have children. Teratogenicity Refers to chemicals that cause adverse effects to the development of the offspring In other words: if you are, or might be pregnant, these chemicals can cause birth defects or cause the fetus to die

Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment 11. Toxicological Information As we can see from the SDS for methanol, it is unknown whether this chemical can cause these problems. Thankfully, we are already going to be protecting ourselves from methanol in every way we can, so even if further studies find out that methanol is a reproductive toxin or causes birth defects, we are likely to be ok! You might come across chemicals that are known teratogens or reproductive toxins even if they arent immediately toxic to you, they can have very serious effects in the future.

Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment 11. Toxicological Information A carcinogen is a chemical that can cause cancer. The section of the SDS under Carcinogenicity will tell you if there have been any tests to determine whether or not this chemical causes cancer. This is why it is always important to protect yourself from hazardous chemicals. You might feel fine when you are working with the chemical day-to-day, but later on in your life you may have harmful health effects show up, like cancer!

Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment 11. Toxicological Information This paragraph of Section 11 gives you more information on the specific symptoms you may experience if you are exposed to methanol. We already knew that methanol was toxic, this paragraph simply tells you what you might experience if youve been exposed to it. However, if you suspect you may have had an exposure, dont wait around to see if symptoms show up! Always report it to HSE and see a doctor to be sure you get the proper help and treatment you might need.

Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment Checkpoint What should you remember from this section? The difference between flash point and autoignition temperature Where to find chemical incompatibilities Different types of chemical instability Be able to recognize the definition for:

carcinogen, germ cell mutagen, reproductive toxin, and teratogen. (You wont need to memorize the exact definition for each, but be able to recognize what each one means) Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment 12. Ecological Information This section may not be very useful for you. It simply details some of the environmental effects that this chemical can have if it enters the water or soil.

At the UofR, all hazardous waste must be turned over for proper disposal and you must never pour harmful chemicals down the sink, or dispose of in the garbage. However, if you suspect you may have had an exposure, dont wait around to see if symptoms show up! Always report it to HSE and see a doctor to be sure you get the proper help and treatment you might need. Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment 13. Disposal Considerations This section is therefore not overly useful to you either, as it typically

refers to chemical treatment or disposal companies. In some cases there may be specific requirements for the disposal of a chemical that you may need to know about, so its a good idea to quickly read this section Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment The Rest of the SDS The remaining sections of the SDS are: 14. Transport information 15. Regulatory information 16. Other information You will likely not find these sections helpful for your purposes, but please note that if you need to transport hazardous

chemicals off-campus, you must contact HSE for help. There are many regulations surrounding the shipment of hazardous chemicals so we must make sure we do it legally and safely. Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment The Rest of WHMIS So we went through the entire SDS for methanol. But there are other components to WHMIS that you should know about: Supplier Labels Workplace Labels WHMIS Education and Training

Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment Supplier Labels Supplier labels will give a short summary of the information we found in the SDS. They serve as a reminder of the hazards, but you should always read the SDS to get all the information you need

Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment Workplace Labels If you need to pour some methanol in a smaller container than the one that was originally supplied, you will need to label that new bottle yourself (this is called a workplace label) Otherwise, no one will know what is in this bottle, or what the hazards are. WHMIS isnt just for you its also for the people around you. For example, if a custodian or lab mate knocks this bottle over, how will they know what they need

to do to protect themselves? Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment Workplace Labels You will also need a workplace label if the original supplier label is damaged and you can no longer read it. Also, some chemicals are very old, and may not have adequate supplier labels either, so its a good idea to check all of your hazardous chemicals to see if more labels are required ? Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment

Workplace Labels We do not yet know the specifics of what is required on a workplace label. The Government of Saskatchewan has to determine what is required, and then the University can update our labels to reflect the change. However, it is predicted that new workplace labels will have similar requirements as the old WHMIS system, so the changes should be minor. Of course, the hazard pictograms will need to be changed, and the precautionary statements will now be standardized. Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment

Training and Education This presentation provides you with a basic understanding of WHMIS. However, your supervisor is required to provide you with the more specific, hands-on training that you will need to perform your experiments safely. They must instruct you on safe handling practices, emergency procedures, and ensure that MSDSs are available to you. Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment Your Rights You should know that you have 3 rights as a worker in Saskatchewan: 1. The right to know about hazards in the workplace and how to protect yourself -ask questions, find more information on equipment and

materials you are being asked to work with 2. The right to participate in health and safety decisions through participation in Occupational Health and Safety Committees, and reporting safety concerns 3. The right to refuse unusually dangerous work If you dont feel adequately trained to do something safely, you have the right to refuse that work until training is provided. You cant be forced to do something that is unsafe, you cant be fired, or be given a bad grade because you refuse to do something that is unsafe Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment Checkpoint

What should you remember from this section? What is the U of R procedure for hazardous waste? What should you do if you need to transport or ship chemicals offcampus? The components to a WHMIS program: Labels, SDSs, Education and Training What situations would you need to use a workplace label? Your 3 rights as a worker in Saskatchewan Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment The Rest of WHMIS So we went through the entire SDS for a specific product: methanol. But what about other chemical hazard classes?

Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment The Rest of WHMIS Physical Hazards Flammable gases / liquids / solids / aerosols Oxidizing gases / liquids / solids

Gases under pressure Self-reactive substances and mixtures Self-heating substances and mixtures Pyrophoric gases / liquids / solids Substances /mixtures which, in contact with water, emit flammable gases Organic peroxides Corrosive to metals Combustible dusts Simple asphyxiants Human Resources

Health, Safety & Environment The Rest of WHMIS Health Hazards Acute toxicity Skin corrosion/irritation Serious eye damage/eye irritation

Respiratory or skin sensitization Germ cell mutagenicity Carcinogenicity Reproductive toxicity Specific target organ toxicity single exposure Specific target organ toxicity repeated exposure Aspiration hazard Biohazardous infectious materials Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment Physical Hazards

Some of these hazard classes are fairly obvious. For example, weve already learned from our methanol example that flammable materials have the ability to catch fire easily. Main hazards: fire and explosion. Pictogram: flame Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment Physical Hazards Oxidizing gases / liquids / solids - may cause, contribute, or intensify a fire or cause a fire or explosion. Main hazards: fire and explosion. Pictogram: flame over circle (the circle denotes the letter O to stand for

Oxidizer) Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment Physical Hazards Gases under pressure- includes compressed, liquefied, and dissolved gases and refrigerated liquefied gases. These are hazardous because of the high pressure inside the cylinder or container. Main hazards: Cylinder or container may explode if heated. Refrigerated liquefied gases are very cold and can cause severe cold (cryogenic) burns or injury. Pictogram: gas cylinder

Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment Physical Hazards Self-reactive substances- may react on their own to cause a fire or explosion, or may cause a fire or explosion if heated Self-heating substances- may heat up by reaction with air, and eventually cause fire Pictogram: depends on the type of self-reactive or self-heating material. Some can cause fire and explosions, some just cause fire and/or Human Resources

Health, Safety & Environment Physical Hazards Pyrophoric gases / liquids / solids- these products can catch fire very quickly (spontaneously) if exposed to air. Substances /mixtures which, in contact with water, emit flammable gases- can catch fire very quickly (spontaneously) if exposed to water Pictogram: flame Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment Physical Hazards Organic peroxides- these products contain the bivalent O-O- chemical

structure, and may cause a fire or explosion if heated Pictogram: depends on the type of organic peroxide. Some can cause fire and explosions, some just cause fire and/or Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment Physical Hazards Corrosive to metals- these products chemically damage or destroy metals. Pictogram: corrosion

Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment Physical Hazards Combustible dust- these products are finely divided solid particles. If dispersed in air, the particles may catch fire or explode if ignited. Pictogram: no pictogram Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment Physical Hazards

Simple asphyxiants- these products are gases that may displace oxygen in air and cause rapid suffocation. Pictogram: no pictogram Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment Health Hazards Acute toxicity- These products are fatal, toxic or harmful if inhaled, following skin contact, or if swallowed. Pictogram: Higher hazard categoriesskull and crossbones Lower hazard categoriesexclamation mark

or Category 1-3 Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment Category 4 Health Hazards Skin corrosion/irritation- cause severe skin burns (corrosion) and irritation. Serious eye damage/eye irritation-cause serious eye damage (corrosion) and irritation Pictogram: Higher hazard categoriescorrosion Lower hazard categoriesexclamation mark

or Category 1 Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment Category 2 Health Hazards Respiratory or skin sensitization- A respiratory sensitizer may cause allergy or asthma symptoms or breathing difficulties if inhaled. Skin sensitizers may cause an allergic skin reaction. Pictogram:

Health hazard or exclamation mark or Respiratory sensitizer Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment Skin sensitizer Health Hazards Germ cell mutagenicity- these products may cause or are suspected of causing genetic defects (permanent changes (mutations) to body cells that

can be passed on to future generations) Pictogram: Health hazard Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment Health Hazards Carcinogenicity- products that may cause or are suspected of causing cancer. Pictogram: Health hazard

Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment Health Hazards Specific target organ toxicity products that cause or may cause damage to organs (e.g., liver, kidneys, or blood) following: single exposure repeated exposure Pictogram: Health hazard or exclamation mark or

Category 1 & 2 Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment Category 3 Health Hazards Aspiration hazard products that may be fatal if they are swallowed and enter the airways Pictogram: Health hazard or exclamation mark

Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment Health Hazards Biohazardous infectious materials These materials are microorganisms, nucleic acids or proteins that cause or is a probable cause of infection, with or without toxicity, in humans or animals Pictogram: Biohazard Human Resources

Health, Safety & Environment Checkpoint What should you remember from this section? Hazard classes be able to recognize/identify hazards of each type of hazard classyou dont need to memorize which categories get which symbols, or remember the names of every class, but be able to recognize the hazards when you read the classifications Understand what the following words mean: Pyrophoric Asphixiant Sensitization Human Resources

Health, Safety & Environment Conclusion The information in this presentation will be tested during an in-person exam during the CLS Workshop To move to the next section, please go back to the main CLS UR Courses page. (You may need to refresh your screen to unlock the next section) Human Resources Health, Safety & Environment

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