Report Writing - University of Utah

Report Writing - University of Utah

Lab Report Grading Terry A. Ring ChE University of Utah Report Grading Scoring Rubric for CHFEN 4903 Categories and Learning Objectives Category Learning Objectives/Outcomes A. Preliminary Oral Presentation, Teamwork (10) (8) Demonstrate effective team skills-goal setting, consensus-building, listening, etc. (9) Demonstrate effective leadership skills team discussions, calling team meetings, etc. (11) Produce a professional-quality oral presentation (as a team), etc. B. Coherence Does the report tell a technically coherent story? Are objectives stated and met?(25) (7) Evaluate the quality of results by comparison with accepted correlations and theories and develop valid

conclusions about deviations etc. (10) Produce professional-quality written reports that present, analyzes, and interprets experimental results logically and which are well-organized and delivered C. Technical Accuracy (45) (1)-(6) Apply concepts from previous courses, mathematics, compute description statistics and apply to analyze experimental data, develop specific experimental objectives to meet overall experimental goals, design and conduct experiments, analyze experimental data to obtain parameters and correlations (7) Evaluate the quality of results by comparison with accepted correlations and theories and develop valid conclusions about deviations etc. D. Professional Standards includes quality of English Language, Form, Visuals, Citations Lab Operations, safety, efficient use of equipment, cleanup (20) (3) Apply methods of statistical inference (10) Produce professional-quality written reports that present, analyzes, and interprets experimental results logically and which are well-organized and delivered

(11) Produce a professional-quality oral presentation, etc. (12) Apply concepts of professional ethics to design and conducting experiments and analyzing and interpreting experimental data (13) Demonstrate knowledge of laboratory equipment and instrumentation and their capabilities and limitations Proficiency and Scoring 4 Levels Exemplary Proficient Apprentice Novice Category Exemplary Proficient Apprentice Novice A. Preliminary Oral Presentation, Teamwork

Student worked well in group, helped set group goals, participated in all team discussions, played a leadership role, prepared well for and presented an excellent oral presentation Student worked well in group, helped set some group goals, participated in most team discussions, prepared well for and presented a good oral presentation Student worked fairly well in group, helped set only a few group goals, participated in a few team discussions, fairly prepared for oral quiz and presented a fair oral presentation Student did not work well in group, did not help set group goals, did

not participate in team discussions, was not prepared for oral quiz and presented a poor presentation B. Coherence Does the report tell a technically coherent story? Are objectives stated and met? Objectives were well stated and all objectives were met. Report told a technically coherent story and was well written. Analyses, interpretations and conclusions clear and logical. Objectives were fairly well stated and most were met. Report told a technically coherent story and was fairly well written. Analyses,

interpretations and conclusions were mostly clear and logical. Objectives were fairly well stated and some objectives were met. Report did not tell a technically coherent story but was fairly well written. Analyses, interpretations and conclusions were fairly clear and logical. Objectives were not stated well and objectives were not met. Report did not tell a technically coherent story and was poorly written. Analyses, interpretations and conclusions were neither clear nor logical. C. Technical Accuracy

Experiments were designed and conducted with virtually no errors; concepts (theory) from previous courses applied correctly; uncertainty analysis excellent; excellent comparison with accepted correlations/results Experiments were designed and conducted with only a few errors; concepts (theory) from previous courses applied correctly with few errors; uncertainty analysis good; good comparison with accepted correlations/results Experiments were designed and conducted with several errors; concepts (theory) from previous courses not

applied correctly; uncertainty analysis fair; comparison with accepted correlations/results not quite done correctly Experiments were not designed and conducted correctly; concepts (theory) from previous courses not understood; uncertainty analysis poor; no comparison with accepted correlations/results Written report is virtually errorfree, well-organized, easy to read, contains highquality graphics, several good references, followed required format; excellent attention to safety and cleanup; knowledgeable of equipment; used equipment efficiently

Written report has only a few errors, relatively wellorganized, easy to read, contains good graphics, a few good references, mostly followed required format; good attention to safety and cleanup; fairly knowledgeable of equipment; mostly used equipment efficiently Written report has several errors, not very well-organized nor easy to read, fair graphics, references not good, usually followed required format; fair attention to safety and cleanup; not very knowledgeable of equipment; used equipment efficiently Written report is not acceptable, not wellorganized nor easy to read, contains poor graphics, no

references, did not followed required format; poor attention to safety and cleanup; not knowledgeable of equipment; used equipment efficiently D. Professional Standards includes quality of English Language, Form, Visuals, Citations Lab Operations, safety, efficient use of equipment, cleanup TOTAL Score ________ _ 10 points max ________ __

25 points max ________ _ 45 points max ________ _ 20 points max _____ ___ 100 points max Oral Report Organization Pick a Topic Pick a Time 17. 18. 19. 20.

1. Genetically modified foods 21. 2. Stem cell research 22. 3. COX-II inhibitors (Vioxx, Celebrex) 23. 4. Biological warfare agents 24. 5. Possible flue pandemic 25. 6. Guidant pace maker recall 26. 7. Gene delivery to treat human disease 27. 8. FDA regulation of pharmaceuticals 28. rd 9. Low cost medical techn. for the 3 World 29. 10. Agricultural use of antibiotics. 30. 11. Agro-chemicals vs. Organic foods 31. 12. Global climate change 32. 13. Mercury pollution 33. 14. Air pollution in Utah

34. 15. Perchlorate pollution in Utah 35. 16. Arctic National Wildlife Refuge drilling 36. 37. 38. Topics Paper vs Plastic Grocery Bags Cloth vs. Disposable diapers Hybrid cars Diesel vs. Gasoline Fuel cells Oil shale The price of gasoline Tar sands Clean coal technology K-12 Science and math education New Orleans levy system Wind Energy Solar energy Nuclear energy Nuclear waste storage in Utah Yucca Mountain Nuclear reactor security at the U

Acid mine drainage in Utah Recycling at the U of U Nuclear weapons testing Sustainable Transportation Saving energy in Salt Lake City Oral Presentation Delivery Times W 10/29 Oral Reports M 11/3 Oral Reports W 11/5 Oral Reports M

11/10 Oral Reports W 11/12 Lab III Assignment Given Out, F 11/14 Lab Report II Due in Dept Office, 1 pm M 11/17 Oral Reports W 11/19 Oral Reports

M 11/24 Oral Reports W 11/26 Oral Reports M 12/1 Oral Reports W 12/3 Oral Reports M 12/8

Oral Reports W 12/10 Oral Reports Report Writing Chemical Engineering 4903 Rather than simply the manner in which engineering design is communicated, writing is the medium through which quality engineering design becomes possible. Swarts and Odell (2001) (ASEE/IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference Proceedings) Overview Utilizing your Writing Consultant Citation Grammar and Punctuation Proofreading and Editing Revision Option

Utilizing your Writing Consultant One-on-one consultation Office: WEB 1813 Hours: T 11:45-12:45 and 2-3; W 2-3 and by appointment Rewrite consultation Email: [email protected] Drop by! Citation Guidelines Cite a text within the body of your report when you quote material from the text when you reference *ideas* that you got from the text (or, often, a few different texts) when you use images, charts, tables, graphs, etc. from the text. The burden of citation becomes greater the farther along in your education and career you get. Citation Guidelines In-text citations require the authors last name and the year of the text, as follows (Last Name, year).

If you cite an authors name in your sentence (see first citation in example below), just cite the date in parentheses. If you do not cite the authors name in your sentence (see second citation), cite both the name and date in parentheses. Example: The coiled tube has been suggested as a useful geometry for certain chemical reactors by Koutsky and Adler (1964) because axial mixing is limited by the transverse flow (Erdogan and Chatwin, 1967; McConalogue, 1970; Nunge et al., 1972). Citation Guidelines Basic Journal Citation: Last name, First initials (additional authors are listed first initials, last name), Article Title, Italicized Journal Title, Bolded Volume Number, beginning page number (year in parentheses). SO: Koutsky, J. A., and R. J. Adler, "Minimization of Axial Dispersion by Use of Secondary Flow in Helical Tubes," Can. J. Chem. Eng., 42, 239 (1964). Citation Guidelines Alphabetize the References page according to the authors (or patentees or editors) last name. List the last name first. Theres no need to reverse the order of second

authors name because it wont be alphabetized. Example: Erdogan, M. E., and P. C. Chatwin, "The Effects of Curvature and Buoyancy on the Laminar Dispersion of Solute in a Horizontal Tube," J. Fluid Mech., 29, 465 (1967). For 4+ authors, list first authors name followed by , et al., Example: Ordway, F. I., et al., Applied Astronautics: An Introduction toSpace Flight, Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, N. J. (1963). Indent second+ lines of citation on References Page. Citation Guidelines See Geoff Silcoxs Web site for the official Guidelines for Literature References in the Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Utah. When in doubt, look it up! The Guidelines document contains citation information for the following kinds of odd resources: emails, corporate authors, encyclopedia references, conference and symposium proceedings, journals with issue numbers or different kinds of pagination, CD-ROM publications, and many more Grammar and Punctuation Voice

Use active voice as much as possible. Passive: A numerical example is now given to illustrate the above example. Active: The following numerical example illustrates this result. Grammar and Punctuation Tense Use past tense for procedural, narrative parts, and calculations; present tense for theory, known facts, and discussing figures, tables and diagrams Past: Early investigations were reviewed. Present: The following numerical example illustrates this result. Grammar and Punctuation Hyphenation Use a hyphen when two or more words modify another word, and the words work as a unit. Do not hyphenate most prefixes added to common nouns.

Examples: She is a health-care worker. (requires hyphen) She works in health care. (no hyphen) She is a healthy, careful worker. (no hyphen) Grammar and Punctuation Hyphenation (cont.) engineering-specific hyphenated terms: Acetic-acid water system bubble-cap tray liquid-gas interface a 20-percent increase a two- or three-year study but dont hyphenate most prefixes: precooled not pre-cooled nonpolar not non-polar Exceptions: co-worker not coworker co-ion not coion Grammar and Punctuation Nonsexist language Nonsexist language is the norm in all professional writing. Try using the plural rather than the singular to avoid any

awkwardness. Sexist: A good writer always proofreads his work. Nonsexist: Good writers always proofread their work. Proofreading and Editing See Professor Rings online Introduction to Report Writing Powerpoint for specific examples of style, grammar, and punctuation rules. Many of the previous examples were culled from the Powerpoint. Proofreading and Editing Proofread, proofread, proofread! Online resource: The Writing Checklist Revise your report at least three different times, with different emphases in mind. Start by looking at the big picture, and slowly narrow your focus down to the smaller and more specific details. Use The Writing Checklist as a guide to your revision process. Its made with the report in mind.

Purpose Use this document to revise, edit, and proofread your own writing more effectively for this course and in the future. The Writing Process Your writing process should involve a number of stages, including research and lab work, planning/outlining, drafting, revising, editing, and proofreading. The best writers often write sections of their reports separately, rather than trying to tackle the entire document all at once. Similarly, the best writers edit in stages, reading through the document over and over again with different emphases in mind. Focusing on a limited number of issues during a given phase of the writing process helps you to revise and edit more effectively. Its more efficient to revise documents beginning with a broad, organizational perspective and moving to a more detailed, sentence-level perspective. That way, you dont waste time polishing sentences that youll end up cutting or rewriting anyway. 1. Revising: The big picture Read your draft from your audiences point of view and check it for the following big-picture concerns: ___AccuracyAre the facts, and the interpretation of the facts, clear and correct? ___SectionsIs each section of the report full and complete? Are sections clearly identifiable and focused? Do you fulfill all the requirements of each section? ___Sectional StructureDo the sections, paragraphs and sentences flow in an order that will be logical from the readers perspective? ___DevelopmentAre key points developed with enough detail? Are you, at any point, in danger of jumping ahead of your reader without providing sufficient explanation between points? ___ArgumentationDo you provide evidence to back up the claims you make, or do you just ask your reader to take your word for it? Do you provide the sources behind your theory? ___CounterargumentsDo you anticipate and address potential disagreements a reader might have with your assertions or questions your reader might wish to ask? ___Overall FocusIs there any distracting or irrelevant information that can be cut without distorting the report?

___Overall StructureIs the information presented in an order that will be logical from the readers perspective? 2. Editing: Narrowing your focus Consider reading your report out loud to yourself at this point. Often, our ears can catch grammatical errors and awkward sentences/transitions that our eyes might miss. Trust your ears, and consider recasting those sentences that feel awkward when read out loud. If the terminology in this section is new to you, please feel free to ask Kathryn questions or drop by her office hours for a brush-up on grammar. ___ToneDo the vocabulary and other features convey an appropriate level of formality and professionalism and an appropriate attitude toward the reader? ___ParagraphsDoes each paragraph have a clear main idea and purpose? Do sentences come in a logical order within the paragraph? ___ContinuityAre there any gaps in information? Do sentences ever seem to jump around without sufficient connection? ___QuotationsHave you double-checked that all quoted material is correctly quoted and cited? Do quotations accurately represent the positions of their authors? ___VoiceIs active voice the default, with passive voice only strategically deployed? Do you avoid the use of we or I? ___Uncertainty AnalysisHave you included an uncertainty analysis in appropriate tables and figures? ___CitationDo you cite your sources correctly and consistently, both in the body of the report and in a list of references? ___TablesAre your tables numbered using Arabic numerals? Are they self-explanatory? Is the descriptive heading at the top? Is the descriptive heading clear and easy to follow? ___FiguresAre your figures numbered using Arabic numerals? Are captions at the bottom of the figure, in complete sentences? Do figures contain axis labels, correlation curves, error

bars, and plots with theoretical lines where applicable? 3. Proofreading: A local focus Always proofread your document at least once after revising/editing before turning it in. ___Headers & FootersDo the correct headers & footers appear on every page, with the correct date and spelling? ___Page NumbersAre page numbers formatted correctly (e.g., not in left margin for bound reports)? ___Title & HeadingsAre the title and all headings accurate and correctly spelled? ___MarginsAre all margins at least 1 wide and no more than 1.25? ___FormatIs the formatting consistent throughout the entire document? ___PunctuationAre you using commas, semicolons, and colons correctly? Are you using quotation marks and periods correctly? (Watch particularly for run-on sentences, comma splices, semi-colon and colon use with dependent clauses, etc.) ___Spelling and GrammarHave you run a spelling and grammar check? Have you fixed any potential problems? ___Prepositional PhrasesIs there more than one prepositional phrase in a given sentence? If so, should the sentence be revised? ___Dependent ClausesDo commas set apart dependent clauses when necessary? ___Dangling ParticiplesDo you avoid dangling participles? ___HyphenationDo you use hyphens to connect two or more words that modify another word, and that work as a unit? ___Nonsexist languageAre you careful to use properly inclusive, professional language throughout? ___NounsAre all acronyms spelled out the first time they appear? Are all proper nouns spelled correctly and capitalized? ___VerbsDo verbs match in number and tense? Do they describe the action you mean them to? Are you using past tense in describing procedure, and present tense in describing theory and discussing figures and diagrams?

___PronounsIs it clear when you use pronouns (especially it or this) what theyre referring back to? Or could a reader be confused about what exactly a pronoun refers to, or its antecedent (especially when a sentence begins with a pronoun)? ___ReadabilityAre your sentences easy to read, or does you reader have to read them two or three times to figure out what you mean? Revision Option Improve your grade. Schedule a one-on-one consultation. Provide Kathryn with a physical copy of your report in advance of the meeting. Come prepared with questions, concerns, and comments from the person who graded your report. Revise your report within one week of your consultation. Hand it in to Kathryn along with the graded original.

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