LS208 Module VIII Applied Lighting Offices Coachs Workbook

LS208 Module VIII Applied Lighting  Offices Coachs Workbook

LS208 Module VIII Applied Lighting Offices Coachs Workbook 1 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Module VIII Office Lighting Chapter 1 Lighting Goals Chapter 2 Office Application Field Trip Chapter 3 Choosing the Right Path: ReLamp, Retrofit, Renovate or Re-Design? Chapter 4 Developing an Office Project Chapter 5 Scorecard and Standards

2 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Learning Objectives 1. You will articulate the goals for Office Lighting and learn the basic terms and concepts necessary to discuss Office Lighting and prepare you for your Field Trip. 2. You will compare what you learned in during the Field Trip and compare it to how similar characteristics are describe in the IES Handbook, the RP, and other industry application literature. 3. Using a theoretical project, you will apply the Choose the Right Path concept and evaluate whether to recommend a relamp, retrofit, renovate or re-design.

4. You will develop the information from Chapter 3 into a project. 5. Using the information from Chapter 4, you will complete the Scorecard exercise and identify key areas from ASHRAE 90.1 2010 that apply to Office projects 3 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. How Does This Apply to My Work? When you review the Introduction to Chapter 32 of the IES Lighting Handbook, 10th Edition look at the difference between figure 32.1 and Figure 32.2. The first, lighting as a % of

Total Operating Cost. The second, lighting as a % of Electrical Cost. Typically, sellers get in the door using: I can show you how to save 50-60% on your lighting. What % of the Total Annual Operating Cost does Lighting represent? Should you address the impact of lighting instead? What accounts for 85% of the Annual Cost? Copyright 2011 Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES

4 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Resources: Download Download Resources DLC Office Guide Compare Systems - Office

Module VIII Worksheet Office Layout Module VIII Fixture Photometrics PDF Format 5 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Resources: Print 10th Edition IESNA Handbook: Chapter 32 Review Chapters 11 -16 RP-1-12 Office Lighting

6 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Chapter 1 Office Lighting Basics Cubicles Direct/Indirect Open Office - Direct Conference

Private Office - Direct Lounge/Meeting Area 7 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Office Basics Goals of Office Lighting Goals of Office Lighting Stimulating work environment

Positive affect on mood and worker productivity Good visibility for performance of visual tasks Balanced brightness between the space and the visual task Energy efficiency and long-term maintenance 8 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Stimulating Work Environment Visual Interest Spatial Diversity Contrast

9 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Mood and Worker Productivity Welcoming View Orderly 10 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Visibility for Visual Task Performance

Ambient Task Lighting Contrast 11 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Balance Brightness Space to Visual Task Brightness Color Contrast Accent 12

2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Energy Efficient Low Maintenance LED Controls Lab Tested Go to Exercise 1.1 Goals of Office Lighting LM-80 and TM-21 13 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 32 - Review Chapter 32: Project Type Application Types Illuminance Recommendations 10 pages Illuminance Criteria

Designing 14 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Chapters 4 and 11 16 Illuminance Determination System Design Chapters 15 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. RP-01-12

RP-01-12 Lighting for Office Facilities Visual task considerations. Contrast, Size, Time and Luminance. Specific areas, e.g.: Open Plan Office Private Offices Conference rooms Reception Areas Offices and the use of Computers 16 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved.

Using the Design Guides Using the Design Guides Design Guides - download Simpler explanation than IESNA

Energy Effective Lighting Quality Issues Achieving Lighting Quality Lighting Specific Areas Lamps, Ballasts, Fixtures and Controls Daylighting 17 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Most Important Design Factors 18

2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Check Your Learning Objective Chapter 1 1. You will articulate the goals for Office Lighting and learn the basic terms and concepts necessary to discuss Office Lighting and prepare you for your Field Trip. 2. Are you able to do this? 3. Can you do it on paper and verbally without the aid of the Module? (You can use your workbook as a Reference.) If yesgo ahead and proceed to Chapter 2. If no go back into the Chapter and your Workbook and practice until you can. Then proceed. 19

2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Chapter 2: The Field Trip Exercise Look and See Task Variation Listen and Learn Go to Exercise 2.1 Horizontal and Vertical Visual Tasks 20 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved.

Lining Up Your Field Trip Selecting an Office Facility As Your Study Site: Criteria Location Cooperation and Access Opportunity Knotty Little Problems

Exercise 2.2 Selecting a Field Trip Site 21 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Using The Programming Checklist Use the Programming Checklist:

Initial Meeting Walking the Facility Work Tasks (Application Types) Before You Leave When You Return to the Office Gathering Additional Information 22 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Site visit Types of Spaces Types of Spaces 1. Open Office

2. Private Offices 3. Conference Room 4. Corridors 5. Restrooms 6. Employee Lounge/Lunch Room 23 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Light and Its Effects Describing Light and Its Effects

Direct Glare Illuminance (Vertical computer screens) Luminance of the Room Surfaces Reflected Glare Source TaskEye Geometry (Veiling Reflections)

Modeling of Faces and Objects Spectral Power distribution Daylight and Views Direct, Indirect and Direct/Indirect Lighting 24 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved.

Direct Glare Direct Glare seeing the source of light Sunlight Brightness Luminaire to Ceiling Exercise 2.3 Direct Glare 25 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved.

Illuminance Illuminance (Vertical computer screens, human interaction, Horizontal reading, paper tasks ) Exercise 2.4 Illuminance 26 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Luminance of Room Surfaces

Luminance Ratios Source: IESNA 9th Edition Handbook, page 11-3,4 Exercise 2.5 Luminance Ratios 27 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Reflected Glare Tablet mirror-like reflection

Source: IESNA 9th Edition Handbook, page 11-5 Exercise 2.6 Reflected Glare 28 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Source TaskEye Geometry (Veiling Reflections) Source: IESNA 9th Edition Handbook, page 11-9

29 Exercise 2.7 Source-Task-Eye Geometry 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Modeling of Faces and Objects Multi-direction Underneath Overhead Candlelight - side

From the Side 30 Exercise 2.8 Facial Modeling 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Spectral Power Distribution Filament RE35 Outdoor Daylight

3500K LED 31 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Daylight and View 32 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Direct, Indirect and Direct/Indirect Lighting

Source: IESNA 9th Edition Handbook, page 11-14 33 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Using Your Own Words Describing Light and Its Effects

Direct Glare Illuminance (Vertical computer screens) Luminance of the Room Surfaces Reflected Glare Source TaskEye Geometry (Veiling Reflections) Modeling of Faces and Objects Spectral Power distribution Daylight and Views Direct, Indirect and Direct/Indirect Lighting

Exercise 2.11 Using Your Own Words 34 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Summing Up the Work of Your Field Trip Learning Office Lighting by Doing Review What You Did Review What You Learned Write About It Exercise 2.12 Summing Up What You Have Learned

35 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Check Your Learning Objective Chapter 2 2. You will apply the basics of Retail Lighting to an observational exercise and to an actual project 1. Are you able to do this? 2. Can you do it on paper and verbally without the aid of the Module? (You can use your workbook as a Reference.) If yesgo ahead and proceed to Chapter 3. If no go back into the Chapter and your Workbook and practice until you can. Then proceed.

36 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Chapter 3 Choosing the Proven Path Choosing the Right Path Re-lamp? Retrofit? YES!!! Renovation ? Re-design?

NO!!! Does the current lighting system support the visual tasks being performed in the space? 37 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Chapter 3 Evaluating a Potential Project The Opportunity: Renovating a four story 57,600 square foot Office Facility looking to become LEED

Certified Existing lighting: 3 lamp 2x4 and 2x2 Rec. parabolic fixtures with T8/741 lamps w/ .87 Ballast Factor, The building, divided into cubicles in the center and private offices on the perimeter, was recently vacated. Objectives: Save energy and reduce maintenance Improve lighting quality and tenant 38

2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Evaluating a Potential Project What You Know: Property Manager works for a large national REIT (Real Estate Investment Trust) The REIT is evaluating whether is makes sense to begin converting some of its properties to LEED Certified over the next several years The REIT has reviewed industry reports indicating that LEED buildings capture

higher rents per square foot, quicker fill rates and improved retention 39 This is a pilot project . 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Additional Discoveries Additional Discoveries: Up to now, the REIT has focused on cost reductions, optimizing the assets they have with a minimum investment

Moving to a LEED focus requires making a substantial investment in the property You have been invited to work with the local property manager who has responsibility for 3 MM square feet of Class A office space Occupancy Rates are soft and the REIT is looking to leverage LEED as a competitive advantage 40 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Why They Are Interested in LEED Assessing the LEED Investment

http:// www.usgbc.org/resources/green-bonds-reits-find-strong-investor -demand-high-performance-property-debt-financing REITs and LEED http://www.forbes.com/sites/bradthomas/2012/11/19/benchmarki ng-green-the-first-investable-us-green-property-indexes-for-reits/# 6757d2644d75 https:// www.sandiego.edu/business/documents/real-estate/Sah%20et% 20al%20%20Page%20Proofs.pdf Using LEED Volume as a technique http://www.facilitiesnet.com/green/article/How-LEED-Volume-CanHelp-Facility-Managers-12932?source=part

41 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. What You Learned on the Building Tour You tour the facility and learn the following: Fixtures are on uniform 8 x 10 centers, with the exception of the 1st Floor lobby Each 2 x 4 luminaire consumes 85 watts Each 2 x 2 luminaire consumes 59 watts Cubicle partitions are 60 high Private offices cover 80% of the perimeter of the window area

15% of the office staff has a view to the outside 42 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. You begin your analysis Space design has moved away from cubicles and towards a functional

open office Daylight and views has become an important part of office design Successful REITs are moving toward acquiring building or upgrading building to LEED status Your client is interested in moving in the direction of LEED and doing a redesign. 43 Re-design of the space affords an 2009 - 2016 National of Independent Lighting

Distributors. All Rights opportunity to Association reduce both energy & Reserved. Existing Office Layout 44 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved.

Whats There Now? 2x4 Parabolic Rec. Troffer 2x2 Parabolic Rec. Troffer Functional Description: Light source Light distribution Shielding Mounting and mechanical Auxiliary electrical 45 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved.

Using The Schematic Design Checklist Using the Schematic Design Checklist: Dont Jump to Solutions Review What You Have Developing Your Design Concept Presenting Your Design Concept Demonstrating Your Approved Design Concept Exercise 3.1 How Would You Approach the Project? 46 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Check Your Learning Objective Chapter 3

Using a theoretical project, you will apply the Choose the Right Path concept and evaluate whether to recommend a re-lamp, retrofit, renovate or re-design. 1. Are you able to do this? 2. Can you do it on paper and verbally without the aid of the Module? (You can use your workbook as a Reference.) If yesgo ahead and proceed to Chapter 4. If no go back into the Chapter and your Workbook and practice until you can. Then proceed. 47 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Chapter 4

Putting Together the Project 48 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Project Concept Maximize energy savings Use controls for both occupancy and daylight integration Increase the number of workers with a view to the outside from their work station Create a space that encourages collaboration,

while still allowing for both quite space and privacy, when required Optimize design for LEED points 49 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Proposed Office Layout 50 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Energy Saving Calculation

Exercise 4.1 Energy Saving Calculation 51 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Energy Saving Calculation 52 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Lumen Method of Calculation

Exercise 4.2 Sample Lumen Method 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Light Level Calculation Exercise 4.3 Relative Lumen Output & Light Loss Factors 54 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Light Level Calculation

55 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Calculating the Room Cavity Height Underside of the 2x4 Fixture 10 AFF 10 Room _____ Cavity Height?

2.5Workplane Exercise 4.4 Calculating the Room Cavity Height 56 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Calculating the Room Cavity Height Underside of the 2x4 Fixture 10 AFF

10 Room _7.5_ Cavity Height? 2.5 Workplane Exercise 4.4 Calculating the Room Cavity Height 57 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved.

Calculating the RCR Room Cavity Ratio 5h x (L + W) (L x W) 4. RCR Room Cavity Ratio 30 0 see pp.405-406 in the IESNA Reference Handbook 80% R= 80%

hCC L = 92 LUMINAIRE PLANE L = 40 hRC H =1210 ??? R= 50%

W = 30 W = 30 HH = 12 = 10 WORKPLANE 30 2.5

R= 20% hFC *** Remember to use the correct height when calculating the Room Cavity Ratio Exercise 4.5: Calculating the RCR 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Calculating the RCR Room Cavity Ratio: 5h x (L + W) (L x W)

Room Cavity Height = (10 2.5) = 7.5 Length = 92 and the Width = 30 5(7.5) x (92+30) (92 x 30) 37.5 x 122 = = 2,760 4,575 2,760

= 1.7 RCR 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Find the Coefficient of Utilization Three elements: (RCR) Room Cavity Ratio

Ceiling, Wall and Floor Reflectance Fixture Efficiency 60 Exercise 4.6 Calculate the Room Cavity Ratio (RCR) 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Calculating the 2x4 Rec. Parabolic CU pFC = 20% pCC = 80% pW = 50% Exercise 4.6 finding the Coefficient of Utilization

2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Calculating the 2x4 Rec. Parabolic CU pFC = 20% pCC = 80% pW = 50% 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Calculating the 2x2 Rec. Parabolic CU pFC = 20% pCC = 80% pW = 50% Exercise 4.7 Finding the Coefficient of Utilization

2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Calculating the 2x2 Rec. Parabolic CU pFC = 20% pCC = 80% pW = 50% 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. What Would We Propose? CR14 with SmartCast 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved.

Calculating the CR14 w/ SmartCast CU pFC = 20% pCC = 80% pW = 50% Exercise 4.8 Finding the Coefficient of Utilization 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Calculating the CR14 w/ SmartCast CU pFC = 20% pCC = 80% pW = 70% 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved.

Check Your CU Values Three elements: (RCR) Room Cavity Ratio Ceiling, Wall and Floor Reflectance Fixture Efficiency 68 Exercise 4.9 Fill in the CU Table for the Project

2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Check Your CU Values Three elements: (RCR) Room Cavity Ratio Ceiling, Wall and Floor Reflectance Fixture Efficiency 69

Exercise 4.9 Fill in the CU Table for the Project 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Proposed Office Layout 70 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Compare: Existing and Proposed Existing

Proposed 71 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Lumen Method of Calculation Exercise 4.10 Completing the Lumen Method of Calculation 72 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved.

Lumen Method of Calculation 73 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Check Your Learning Objective Chapter 4 You will develop the information from Chapter 3 into a project. 1. Are you able to do this? 2. Can you do it on paper and verbally without the aid of the Module? (You can use your workbook as a Reference.) If yesgo ahead and proceed to Chapter 5. If no go back into the Chapter and your Workbook and practice until you can. Then proceed.

74 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Chapter 5 Using the Scorecard Making a Decision What Should You Propose? 75 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Building Area Method - Scorecard

Exercise 5.1 Scorecard Exercise 76 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Calculate Lighting Power Density and Energy Using your Workbook Calculate the Lighting Power Density and the Energy Savings Exercise 5.2 Lighting Power Density Exercise

77 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Calculating Payback and ROI Exercise 5.1 Scorecard Exercise 78 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved.

Building Area Method - Scorecard 79 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. Energy Savings and LPD 80 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. 81 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved.

Using the Scorecard Using One Watt and the Scorecard $ 6,112 savings $ 43,545 investment (labor and material $ 21,773 utility incentive 85.5 Payback in months 42.7 months (w/ incentive) 14.0% ROI 28.1% (w/incentive) 82 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved.

Practical Benefits Practical Benefits 100% of the Workforce has view to outside Dramatic change in the look and feel of the space Design optimizes LEED points for energy, daylight integration and controls Supports the changes in the way of working Flexible teams, varied workplace needs during the day Competitive with New Construction offices Reduces NOE, supports worker productivity

83 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. ASHRAE 90.1 - 2010 8.4.2 Automatic Receptacle Control 9.4.1 Lighting Control 9.4.1.1 Automatic Lighting Shutoff 9.4.1.2 Space Control 9.4.1.4 Automatic Daylighting Controls 9.4.4 Functional Testing 84 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved.

8.4.2 Automatic Receptacle Control 50% of 120v 15A and 20A receptacles Private Office Open Offices Computer Classrooms Automatic Control Device

Time of Day device Occupancy Sensor Other Control Device 85 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. 9.4.1 Lighting Control 9.4.1.1 Automatic Lighting Shutoff Manual On or Automatic On to <= 50%

power Time of Day device Occupancy Sensor Other Control Device <= 25,000 sq. ft. , not more than one floor 86 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved.

9.4.1 Lighting Control 9.4.1.2 Space Control One control step between 30% and 70% Other than On/Off All spaces w/ floor to ceiling partitions See exceptions 87 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved.

9.4.1 Lighting Control 9.4.1.4 Automatic Daylighting Controls (side lighted areas) Any windowed enclosed space>= 250 sq. ft. Stipulations: Calibration remote from the

photosensor and accessible w/ one control step between 50 and 70% and no greater than 35% (including off) See exceptions 88 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved. 9.4.4 Functional Testing Control devices:

Calibrated, adjusted and programmed to perform as set forth in construction documents Occupancy Sensors work as designed Program time switches and schedule controls Daylight integration sensors and controls work as intended Identify person who will conduct and certify functional testing 89 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved.

Check Your Learning Objective Chapter 5 Using the information from Chapter 4, you will complete the Scorecard exercise and identify key areas from ASHRAE 90.1 2010 that apply to Industrial projects 1. Are you able to do this? 2. Can you do it on paper and verbally without the aid of the Module? (You can use your workbook as a Reference.) If yesgo ahead and proceed to the Module Quiz. If no go back into the Chapter and your Workbook and practice until you can. Then proceed. 90 2009 - 2016 National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors. All Rights Reserved.

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