Office of Sustainable Housing and Communities Performance Measurement

Office of Sustainable Housing and Communities Performance Measurement

Office of Sustainable Housing and Communities Performance Measurement Webinar June 7th, 2012 HUD OSHC Summit Consulting ICF International We will be starting in a few minutes Be sure you have also called into the webinar: 1 (800) 762-4758; Participant code: 1111111 Introduction Mariia Zimmerman, Deputy Director

Office of Sustainable Housing and Communities, HUD Welcome and Introduction Use Q and A menu to ask questions during the webinar. Moderators will pass questions onto presenters. The webinar will be archived on the Learning Network website. The Handbook and fact sheets will be mailed out and are also available on the Learning Network and on the OSHC website under Resources. Performance Measurement and

Planning Why focus on performance measures? Challenges of performance measurement for planning activities. Balancing the unique needs and objectives of each community with federal program evaluation: Local performance measures developed through the planning process Performance measures common to all grantees used for program evaluation Requirements for FY10 and FY11 Grantees

Grantees are asked to report on three types of performance measures: 1. Planning outcomes: reported through the e-Logic model. 2. Flagship Sustainability Indicators: reported through the PPRA form. 3. Grantee-driven performance measures: not reported. For FY10 grantees, reporting on Flagship Sustainability Indicators is optional. For FY11 grantees, reporting on Flagship Sustainability Indicators is required. Flexibility in Performance

Measurement Some communities may need more assistance to gather these measures, and we have technical assistance available: contact [email protected] TA will be live next week; watch for an email from HUD when it is ready for assistance requests Some data may not be available for every geography, e.g. rural areas. Work with your GTR, especially to obtain waivers if needed due to lack of data availability.

Using the e-Logic Model Reporting Planning Outcomes through the e-Logic model reporting is part of the Grant Terms and Conditions. FY11 grantees will receive additional guidance on how to use the e-Logic model. No required number of measures must be reported. We have identified some e-Logic measures that correspond better to the Flagship Indicators: FY10 grantees have already established their eLogic measures. FY11 grantees are encouraged to consider the recommended list, but are not required to use it. Overview of Todays Presentation

Part 1: Overview of performance indicators and their role in the PSC grant process Part 2: Technical guidance on Flagship Sustainability Indicator calculations and data sources (introducing fact sheets and TA) Questions? To ask a question: In the meeting client, click the Q&A menu. Type your question in the Q&A text box, and then click Ask. To raise your hand:

In the meeting client, click the Q&A menu. In the Q&A box, click the Raise your hand icon. Overview of Performance Indicators in the OSHC Grant Process Harrison Rue, ICF International Performance Measurement in the Sustainable Communities Initiative Why are we measuring performance in the Sustainable Communities Initiative? 1. To demonstrate impacts and identify best

practices. 2. To develop a common framework for measuring progress toward sustainable communities. 3. To empower communities to track progress toward their own individual sustainability goals. What Well Cover in This Presentation Types of performance measures used in the Sustainable Communities Initiative. Overview of Flagship Sustainability Indicators, fact sheets and key issues.

Types of Performance Measures in the Sustainable Communities Initiative Grantees are asked to track three types of performance measures: Planning outcomes Flagship Sustainability Indicators Grantee-driven performance measures The following slides describe each type of measure in more detail.

Planning Outcomes Purpose: to measure changes in a community directly resulting from the planning effort conducted by the grantee with HUD funding. Quantitative measures related to: Planning outcomes (e.g. brownfield sites identified for redevelopment). Projected changes (e.g. projected percent change in transit mode share). Agreed upon by HUD and grantee. Reported through e-Logic model. About the e-Logic Model

FY10 grantees are accustomed to e-Logic model FY11 grantees have not been exposed to the model yet OSHC will be releasing additional information Flagship Sustainability Indicators Purpose: to develop a common national framework for measuring long-term progress toward sustainable communities Quantitative measures in five categories of outcomes that relate to the six Livability Principles

Common to all grantees Expected that they will be refined over time Flagship Sustainability Indicators Reported through form SF-PPR-A, submitted through semi-annual reporting process Required for FY2011 grantees, optional for FY2010 grantees Work with GTR to obtain a waiver if data is unavailable. Technical assistance provided on these indicators for ALL grantees: OSHC [email protected]

Relationship Between e-Logic measures and Flagship Sustainability Indicators Planned increase in miles of bike/pedestrian infrastructure Projected change in the proportion of commute trips made by public transit, biking, and/or walking Projected increased change in the number of low and very low-income households within a 30-minute transit commute of employment centers Projected percent change in automobile mode share along the corridor Projected percent change in pedestrian mode share along the corridor Transportatio Projected percent change in transit mode share along the corridor n Choice

Projected percent change in bicycle mode share along the corridor Projected number of housing units close to high-quality transit service in urban areas Projected number of affordable housing units close to high-quality transit service in urban areas Projected number of affordable housing units close to high-quality transit service within rural town centers Projected number of affordable and workforce housing units close to high-quality transit service in urban areas Change in the number of census tracts covered by inclusionary zoning Projected change in number of census tracts in the planning area with high concentrations of poverty and minority segregation Projected change in the Dissimilarity Index for census tracts in the

planning area Housing Decreased number of census tracts in the planning area with high Affordability concentrations of poverty and minority segregation Projected investment in mixed use development on land acquired through land banking Properties purchased as a result of creation of land bank fund Projected increased change in the number of low and very low income households within a 30 minute transit commute of employment centers Equitable Projected change in median combined housing and transportation Developmen costs for low income populations in the planning area t: Housing Projected change in median combined housing and transportation

costs for minority populations in the planning area and Transportati Projected change in total combined housing and transportation costs on for low-income populations in the planning area Affordability Projected change in total combined housing and transportation costs for minority populations in the planning area Projected change in the number of affordable housing units close to health care facilities Incorporate health considerations (based on baseline spatial assessment of health status indicators) into planning process Increased number of households within one mile of a healthy food source

Equitable Development: Access to Healthy Increased proportion of affordable housing units that have Food Choices high access to a supermarket or grocery store that provides quality fresh foods Planned change in the number of census tracts containing Green Space as a result of the adoption of the Regional Plan for Sustainable Development Planned change in the number of census tracts containing Green Space as a result of the adoption of the Community

Equitable Challenge Plan Development: Access to Open Projected change in the number of affordable housing units Space close to parks Planned Green Space preserved as a result of the adoption of the Regional Plan for Sustainable Development Planned Green Space preserved as a result of the adoption of the Community Challenge Plan Number of persons employed as a result of investing in commercial and industrial centers Number of persons employed as a result of investing in

Economic transportation Resilience: Projected number of new businesses along the corridor Economic Projected number of new FTE jobs along the corridor Diversification Index Projected number of new job opportunities for low and Change in the share of commercial and industrial facilities constructed on underutilized infill sites Planned change in the acres of land dedicated to commercial use with a FAR of more than 0.8 Change in the share of commercial and public serving facilities

constructed on underutilized infill sites Planned change in the share of already developed land in rural Growth through areas that is tied to existing infrastructure systems Reinvestment: Change in the average units per acre of residential Land lost to new development development Planned change in the number of housing units per acre of existing commercial development Planned number of housing units constructed on underutilized infill sites Planned change in the number of acres of land with more than 12 housing units per acre Brownfield sites identified for redevelopment

Brownfield sites identified for remediation Brownfield sites in predominately low income and/or minority communities identified for redevelopment Growth Brownfield sites in predominately low income and/or minority through communities identified for remediation Reinvestment: Reduction in facilities that cause environmental or public health Reinvestment hazards sited near residential areas in developed areas Reduction in facilities that cause environmental or public health hazards sited near predominately low income and/or minority residential areas

Strategic Plans adopted for investments in support of cultural assets Strategic Plans adopted to implement activities in support of cultural assets Number of persons interested in participating in an active role in the Public governance structure of the regional planning partnership as a result Engagement of the education and outreach sessions Percent increase in the number of persons attending scenario and public meetings on regional planning as a result of attending education and training sessions Corridor Plan adopted Include representative(s) from public health sector (e.g., state, county, or local health commissioner(s), environmental health specialist(s), or other designee(s)) in consortium and work group(s)

Include representative(s) from public health sector (e.g., state, Grantee-Driven Performance Measures Purpose: to measure progress toward additional community goals and help tell the story of community successes. Grantees are free to define and report on measures as they see fit. Will vary between grantees. Report through customized e-Logic model, performance progress reports, or other reporting mechanisms.

Flagship Sustainability Indicator Fact Sheets Harrison Rue, ICF International Flagship Sustainability Indicator Fact Sheets Flagship Sustainability Indicators are the main subject of this webinar and of the accompanying fact sheets. Each fact sheet contains the following information: Purpose (overview, how to interpret results) Key data sources (e.g. Census, ACS, CPD Maps)

Data elements (key variables by source) Step-by-step guidance on obtaining data Basic calculation steps Geographies, data updates, & other things to Key Issue: Data Geography Data for each indicator may not always be available in a geography that exactly matches the project area. If this is the case: Refer to fact sheet guidance on how to gather data for the appropriate geographic level. Check the Geographies, Data Updates, and Other Things to Consider / If Data is Not

Available sections of the fact sheets. Contact the technical assistance team. Work with GTR if waiver is needed for Indicator on form SF-PPR-A. Overview of Flagship Sustainability Indicators The eight Flagship Sustainability Indicators measure performance across five categories of outcomes that align with the Livability Principles: 1. Transportation Choice 2. Housing Affordability 3. Equitable Development

4. Economic Resilience 5. Growth Through Reinvestment The following slides briefly describe each outcome and the indicators associated with it. 1. Transportation Choice Definition: Communities feature multiple safe and convenient options for people to walk, bike, or ride in order to reduce congestion and air pollution, lower transportation costs, and improve public health. Indicator: 1.1: Total percentage of workers commuting via walking, biking, transit, or rideshare

2. Housing Affordability Definition: Communities include a variety of housing choices, are affordable for all, and reverse a long-standing trend of steadily increasing housing costs. Indicator: 2.1: Percentage of rental units and owneroccupied units affordable to households earning 80% of area median family income 3. Equitable Development Definition: New growth and sustainability benefits extend to all community members, reducing costs and ensuring access to vital

services for both the general population and for low-to-moderate income households. Indicators: 3.1: Combined Housing and Transportation Affordability - Proportion of average household income spent on housing and transportation costs (calculated both for the project area as a whole and for areas with over 50% low-moderate income households) 3. Equitable Development Indicators (continued): 3.2: Access to healthy food choices - Percent of total population that resides in a low

income census tract and resides more than one mile (ten miles in rural areas) from a supermarket 3.3: Access to open space - Percent of total population that resides within a half-mile mile (one mile in rural areas) of a park or open space (calculated both for the project area as a whole and for areas with over 50% lowmoderate income households) 4. Economic Resilience Definition: Communities with stable, efficient, and diverse economies are better able to withstand economic shocks. Indicators:

4.1: Economic Diversification Index Diversity of the local economy as compared to the diversity of the national economy 4.2: General local government debt-torevenue ratio 5. Growth Through Reinvestment Definition: New growth and sustainability benefits extend to all community members, reducing costs and ensuring access to vital services for both the general population and for low-income households. Indicators: 5.1: Net acres of agricultural and natural resource land lost annually to development per new resident

Technical Assistance Team The TA team is available to assist with questions regarding data collection and calculations for Flagship Sustainability Indicators. Contact: [email protected] Questions? To ask a question: In the meeting client, click the Q&A menu. Type your question in the Q&A text box, and then click Ask.

To raise your hand: In the meeting client, click the Q&A menu. In the Q&A box, click the Raise your hand icon. Technical Guidance on Flagship Sustainability Indicator Fact Sheets Harrison Rue, ICF International Eliot Rose, ICF International Flagship Sustainability Indicators Purpose: to develop a common national

framework for measuring long-term progress toward sustainable communities Quantitative measures in five categories of outcomes Tracked over time using form SF-PPR-A Some indicators may not change in value over the short term as a result of the grant Some indicators may take longer to compile and can be reported in future quarterly reports What Well Cover in This Presentation

Overview of the fact sheets and data sources. Key issues that are common across indicators. Purpose, data sources, update schedule, and availability for each indicator. Example of collecting data and conducting calculations for one indicator. What Each Fact Sheet Contains 1. Purpose of the indicator (overview, how to interpret results) 2. Key data sources (e.g. Census, ACS, County Business Patterns, HUD CPD Maps)

3. Data elements (key variables and their sources) 4. Step-by-step guidance on obtaining data 5. Basic calculation steps 6. Geographies, data updates, and other things to consider (what levels data is available at, how frequently indicators should be updated, other considerations that may affect grantees) 7. If data is not available Key Indicator Data Sources Data collected by government agencies: Census Bureau (American Community Survey, County Business Patterns) HUD (CPD Maps)

USDA (Food Environment Atlas) Data provided by non-profit groups: Center for Neighborhood Technology Trust for Public Lands Local data Key Issue: ACS Block Group-Level Data Most Census data is available online through FactFinder 2 (factfinder2.census.gov/), the Census online data portal. However, block group data, which is used in many indicators, particularly for neighborhood-level projects, must be downloaded from the Census

summary file. The Census Bureau has released a spreadsheet-based tool to assist with the process. The fact sheets contain a separate appendix on downloading block group data. Key Issue: Weighted Averages Many project areas consist of multiple geographies, and will need to weight indicators by the proportion of the population that lives in each geography. The TA team has provided a separate spreadsheet tool to assist with calculating weighted averages.

A similar tool is also available to assist grantees with normalizing data for Indicator 4.1. Individual Flagship Sustainability Indicator Fact Sheets Harrison Rue, ICF International Eliot Rose, ICF International Transportation Choice Indicator 1.1: Total percentage of workers commuting via walking, biking, transit, or rideshare

Purpose: A shift from solo driving to alternative transportation can reduce congestion, mitigate pollution, reduce transportation costs, and improve public health. Data Source: The U.S. Census American Community The main page for American Survey (ACS). FactFinder, the portal for Updates: at least every 5 accessing ACS data. years, depending on

geography. Availability: nationwide. Housing Affordability Indicator 2.1: Percentage of units affordable to households earning 80% of HUD area median family income (HAMFI) Purpose: Measures whether housing is affordable for the majority of community members. Data Source: HUDs recently-released

Community Planning and Development Maps (CPD Maps) tool. Updates: Planned; schedule to be determined. Availability: nationwide at the census tract level. CPD Maps display of % of units affordable to households earning 80% HAMFI. Equitable Development Indicator 3.1:

Combined Housing and Transportation Affordability Definition: Proportion of household income spent on housing and transportation costs, calculated both for total population and for block groups where 50% of households are low-to-moderate income (<80%HAMFI). Purpose: Paints a more complete picture of affordability by measuring the combined impact of housing and transportation costs, which are the two largest cost burdens for U.S. Households. Equitable Development Indicator 3.1:

Combined Housing and Transportation Affordability Data Sources: The Center for Neighborhood Technologys (CNT) Housing + Transportation Affordability Index (H+TA Index) (percent of average household income devoted to housing and transportation) CPD Maps (low-to-moderate income areas) ACS: (population by block group) Updates: Planned; schedule to be

determined. Update to H+TA Index expected in Winter 2012. Availability: Most metropolitan areas. H+TA Index Map showing areas where housing + transportation costs are over 45% (blue) and under 45% of average household income (yellow), with block group details. Equitable Development Indicator 3.2: Access to healthy food choices Definition: Percent of total population that

resides in a low income census tract AND resides more than one mile (ten miles in rural areas) from a supermarket. Purpose: Food access is a key issue in lowincome communities, both because of lack of transportation options and lack of stores, and this measure identifies the share of a project areas population that potentially lacks access to healthy food. Equitable Development Indicator 3.2: Access to healthy food choices Data Source: USDA Food Environment Atlas.

Updates: None planned. Availability: Nationwide at the county level. Map showing access to supermarkets among low-income households in Illinois. Equitable Development Indicator 3.3: Access to open space Definition: Percent of total population that resides within a half-mile (one mile in rural

areas) of a park or open space, calculated both for total population and for block groups where 50% of households are lowto-moderate income (<80%HAMFI). Purpose: Open space encourages physical activity, improves public health and quality of life, and provides environmental benefits. Equitable Development Indicator 3.3: Access to open space Data Sources: Local GIS layer of parks (parks access in most areas) Trust for Public Lands

ParkScore (parks access in the 40 largest U.S. cities) CPD Maps (low-to-moderate income areas) ACS (population by block group) Updates: Varies by location. Availability: Varies by location. ParkScore map of Chicago. Parks are in green, areas that need parks are in orange and red.

Economic Resilience Indicator 4.1: Economic Diversification Index Definition: Diversity of the local economy as compared to the diversity of the national economy. Purpose: Measures a communitys ability to adapt to change in the event that any one employment sector faces decline. Data Source: Census County Business Patterns (CBP): number of establishments and employees by industry sector.

Updates: Planned, schedule to be determined. Availability: All metropolitan areas at the zip code, county, and metro area level. Sample CBP data for the greater Chicago area. Economic Resilience Indicator 4.2: General local government debt-torevenue ratio Purpose: measures the ability of a local government to weather economic shocks.

Data Sources: United States Census Bureau 2007 County and City Data Book Local data on government debts and revenues (where available) Updates: Unclear for City and County Data Book; varies by location for local data. Availability: nationwide at the county level. Growth Through Reinvestment Indicator 5.1: Net acres of agricultural and natural resource land lost annually to

development per new resident Purpose: Measures the extent to which new development in project areas occurs through reinvestment in existing communities and infill development versus on undeveloped land. Growth Through Reinvestment Indicator 5.1: Net acres of agricultural and natural resource land lost annually to

development per new resident Data Sources: National Land Cover Database (NLCD) (data on land use change between 2001 and 2006) State and local data on land use change, where available ACS (population) Updates: Every five years for the NLCD and ACS; varies by location for state and local data.

Availability: Nationwide at the community-wide level. NLCD map of land cover over the entire U.S. Step-by-Step Guidance for example Indicator Housing Affordability Indicator 2.1 Eliot Rose, ICF International Step-by-step Guidance on Data and Calculations for Indicator 2.1

This webinar does not allow time for us to go through guidance on collecting and calculating every indicator in detail. Instead, we will go through the process for one sample indicator, Housing Affordability Indicator 2.1: Percentage of units affordable to households earning 80% of HUD area median family income (HAMFI). The purpose is to give grantees a sense of how the fact sheets work and of the depth of guidance included in the fact sheets. Open CPD Maps and Zoom in on the Project Area

1. Go to http://egis.hud.gov/cpdmaps/. 2. Close the Guide Me window. 3. Use the map tools to zoom in on the project area. Select the Report Geography 1. Click on the Reports icon on the toolbar at the top of the screen. 2. In the Target Jurisdiction drop-down menu, select a geography. Select the Project Area 1. Use the drawing controls in the window to select the project area on the map.

2. Click the Next button in the lower-right corner of the Reports window. Obtain Data for the Report 1. Click Next again to skip including reference data. 2. Click the Uncheck All button, and then click the check box next to Housing Supply. 3. Click the Finish button. 4. Your browser will download an Excel file with data. Basic Calculation Steps 1. Divide the number of rental housing units affordable to

households earning 80% of the HAMFI by the total number of rental households. 2. Divide the number of owner-occupied housing units affordable to households earning 80% of the HAMFI by the total number of owneroccupied housing units. Questions? To ask a question: In the meeting client, click the Q&A menu.

Type your question in the Q&A text box, and then click Ask. To raise your hand: In the meeting client, click the Q&A menu. In the Q&A box, click the Raise your hand icon.

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