1D SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MORPHODYNAMICS with applications to RIVERS

1D SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MORPHODYNAMICS with applications to RIVERS

1D SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MORPHODYNAMICS with applications to RIVERS AND TURBIDITY CURRENTS Gary Parker November, 2004 CHAPTER 6: THRESHOLD OF MOTION AND SUSPENSION Rock scree face in Iceland. 1 1D SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MORPHODYNAMICS with applications to RIVERS AND TURBIDITY CURRENTS Gary Parker November, 2004 ANGLE OF REPOSE A pile of sediment at resting at the angle of repose r represents a threshold condition; any slight disturbance causes a failure. Here the pile of sediment is under water. Consider the indicated grain. The net downslope gravitational force acting on the grain (gravitational force 3 buoyancy force) is 3 4 4 D D Fgt s g sin r g sin r 3 3 2 2 3 4 D Rg sin r 3 2 , R Fc Fgn r

s 1 The net normal force is 3 4 D Fgn Rg cos r 3 2 The net Coulomb resistive force to motion is 3 Fc c 4 D Rg cos r 3 2 Force balance requires that Fgt Fc 0 Fgt or thus: tan r c which is how c is measured (note that it is dimensionless). For natural sediments, r ~ 30 ~ 40 and c ~ 0.58 ~ 0.84. 2 1D SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MORPHODYNAMICS with applications to RIVERS AND TURBIDITY CURRENTS Gary Parker November, 2004 THRESHOLD OF MOTION The Shields number * is defined as b

u2* RgD RgD Shields (1936) determined experimentally that a minimum, or critical Shields number c is required to initiate motion of the grains of a bed composed of noncohesive particles. Brownlie (1981) fitted a curve to the experimental line of Shields and obtained the following fit: 0.22 Re c 0 .6 p 0.06 10 ( 7.7 Re p 0.6 ) RgD D , Re p Based on information contained in Neill (1968), Parker et al. (2003) amended the above relation to 0.5 [0.22 Re c 0 .6 p 0.06 10 ( 7.7 Re p 0.6 ) ] In the limit of sufficiently large Rep (fully rough flow), then, c becomes equal to 3 0.03. 1D SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MORPHODYNAMICS with applications to RIVERS AND TURBIDITY CURRENTS

Gary Parker November, 2004 MODIFIED SHIELDS DIAGRAM 0.1 0.09 The silt-sand and sand-gravel borders correspond to the values of Rep computed with R = 1.65, = 0.01 cm2/s and D = 0.0625 mm and 2 mm, respectively. 0.08 0.07 c* 0.06 0.05 0.04 0.03 0.02 silt 0.01 sand gravel 0 1 10 100 1000 Rep 10000 100000 1000000 4

1D SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MORPHODYNAMICS with applications to RIVERS AND TURBIDITY CURRENTS Gary Parker November, 2004 LAW OF THE WALL FOR TURBULENT FLOWS Turbulent flow near a wall (such as the bed of a river) can often be approximated in terms of a logarithmic law of the wall of the following form: u 1 z uk s n B u k s where u denotes streamwise flow velocity averaged over turbulence, z is a coordinate upward normal from the bed, u* = (b/)1/2 denotes the shear velocity, = 0.4 denotes the Karman constant and B is a function of the roughness Reynolds number (u*ks)/ taking the form of the plot on the next page (e.g. Schlichting, 1968). u( z ) z 5 1D SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MORPHODYNAMICS with applications to RIVERS AND TURBIDITY CURRENTS Gary Parker November, 2004 B AS A FUNCTION OF ROUGHNESS REYNOLDS NUMBER 12 u 1 z u k n B s u k s B 10 8

6 4 1 10 100 u*ks/ 1000 6 1D SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MORPHODYNAMICS with applications to RIVERS AND TURBIDITY CURRENTS Gary Parker November, 2004 ROUGH, SMOOTH AND TRANSITIONAL REGIMES Logarithmic form of law of the wall: u 1 z uk s n B u k s Viscosity damps turbulence near a wall. A scale for the thickness of this viscous sublayer in which turbulence is damped is v = 11.6 /u* (Schlichting, 1968). If ks/v >> 1 the viscous sublayer is interrupted by the bed roughness, roughness elements interact directly with the turbulence and the flow is in the hydraulically rough regime: B 8.5 , u 1 z n 8.5 u k s for ks 8.62 v or

uk s 100 If ks/v << 1 the viscous sublayer lubricates the roughness elements so they do not interact with turbulence, and the flow is in the hydraulically smooth regime: B 5.5 1 uk s n , u 1 uz n 5 .5 u for ks 0.26 v For 0.26 < ks/v < 8.62 the near-wall flow is transitional between the hydraulically smooth and hydraulically rough regimes. or uk s 3 7 1D SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MORPHODYNAMICS with applications to RIVERS AND TURBIDITY CURRENTS Gary Parker November, 2004 B AS A FUNCTION OF ROUGHNESS REYNOLDS NUMBER: REGIMES 12 u 1 z u k n B s u k s

1 u k B n s 5.5 B 10 8 B 8.5 6 smooth transitional rough 4 1 10 100 u*ks/ 1000 8 1D SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MORPHODYNAMICS with applications to RIVERS AND TURBIDITY CURRENTS Gary Parker November, 2004 DRAG ON A SPHERE Consider a sphere with diameter D immersed in a Newtonian fluid with density and kinematic viscosity (e.g. water) and subject to a steady flow with velocity uf relative to the sphere. The drag force on the sphere is given as Drag Curve for Sphere 2 1 D 2 FD c D u f

2 2 10000 1000 Note the existence of an inertial range (1000 < ufD/ < 100000) where cD is between 0.4 and 0.5. 100 cD where the drag coefficient cD is a function of the Reynolds number (ufD)/, as given in the diagram to the right. 10 1 0.1 0.1 1 10 100 1000 ufD/ 10000 100000 1000000 9 1D SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MORPHODYNAMICS with applications to RIVERS AND TURBIDITY CURRENTS Gary Parker November, 2004

THRESHOLD OF MOTION: TURBULENT ROUGH FLOW, NEARLY FLAT BED This is a brief and partial sketch: more detailed analyses can be found in Ikeda (1982) and Wiberg and Smith (1987). The flow is over a granular bed with sediment size D. The mean bed slope S is small, i.e. S << 1. Assume that ks = nkD, where nk is a dimensionless, o(1) number (e.g. 2). Consider an exposed particle the centroid of which protrudes up from the mean bed by an amount neD, where ne is again dimensionless and o(1). The flow over the bed is assumed to be turbulent rough, and the drag on the grain is assumed to be in the inertial range. Fluid drag tends to move the particle; Coulomb resistance impedes motion. 2 1 D FD c D u2f 2 2 4 D Fg Rg 3 2 Fc cFg Impelling fluid drag force u( z) 3 Threshold of motion: Submerged weight of grain Fc FD Coulomb resistive force FD Fc or thus u2f 4 c RgD 3 c D

10 1D SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MORPHODYNAMICS with applications to RIVERS AND TURBIDITY CURRENTS Gary Parker November, 2004 THRESHOLD OF MOTION: TURBULENT ROUGH FLOW, NEARLY FLAT BED (contd.) Since ks = nkD and the centroid of the particle is at z = neD, the mean flow velocity acting on the particle uf is given from the law of the wall as u( z ) uf u z neD 1 neD nk uD B n u u nk D As long as nku*D/ > 100, B can be set equal to 8.5, so that Fc FD n uf Fu 2.5n e 8.5 u nk In addition, if ufD/ = Fuu*D/ is between 1000 and 100000, cD can be approximated as 0.45. Setting nk = ne = 2 as an example, it is found that Fu = 8.5. Further assuming that c = 0.7, the Shields condition2 for the threshold of motion becomes 2 uf 4 c u 4 c c 0.0287 2

RgD 3 c D RgD 3 c DFu This is not a bad approximation of the asymptotic value of c* from the modified Shields curve of 0.03 for (RgD)1/2D/. For a theoretical derivation of the full Shields 11 curve see Wiberg and Smith (1987). 1D SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MORPHODYNAMICS with applications to RIVERS AND TURBIDITY CURRENTS Gary Parker November, 2004 CASE OF SIGNIFICANT STREAMWISE SLOPE Let denote the angle of streamwise tilt of the bed, so that S tan If is sufficiently high then in addition to the drag force FD , there is a direct tangential gravitational force Fgt impelling the particle downslope. 2 1 D FD c D u2f 2 2 3 4 D , Fgn Rg cos 3 2 3 4 D , Fgt Rg sin 3 2 , Fc cFgn Force balance: FD Fgt cFgn

tan cos (1 ) c c or reducing, Fc Fgt Fgn FD co where c* = the critical Shields number on the slope and co* = the value on a nearly horizontal bed. 12 1D SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MORPHODYNAMICS with applications to RIVERS AND TURBIDITY CURRENTS Gary Parker November, 2004 VARIATION OF CRITICAL SHIELDS STRESS WITH STREAMWISE BED SLOPE Shields Relation, Streamwise Angle = 35 deg r 1.2 1 c co 0.8 0.6 0.4 0.2

0 0 5 10 15 20 deg 25 30 35 40 13 1D SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MORPHODYNAMICS with applications to RIVERS AND TURBIDITY CURRENTS Gary Parker November, 2004 CASE OF SIGNIFICANT TRANSVERSE SLOPE (BUT NEGLIGIBLE STREAMWISE SLOPE) Let denote the angle of transverse tilt of the bed y x transverse pull of gravity fluid drag A formulation similar to that for streamwise tilt yields the result: tan 2 c co cos 1

2 c 1/ 2 A general formulation of the threshold of motion for arbitrary bed slope is given in Seminara et al. (2002). This formulation includes a lift force acting on a 14 particle, which has been neglected for simplicity in the present analysis. 1D SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MORPHODYNAMICS with applications to RIVERS AND TURBIDITY CURRENTS Gary Parker November, 2004 VARIATION OF CRITICAL SHIELDS STRESS WITH TRANSVERSE BED SLOPE Shields Relation, Transverse Angle = 35 deg r 1.2 1 0.8 x c 0.6 co 0.4 0.2 0 0 5 10 15 20 deg

25 30 35 40 j deg 15 1D SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MORPHODYNAMICS with applications to RIVERS AND TURBIDITY CURRENTS Gary Parker November, 2004 SEDIMENT MIXTURES: COARSER GRAINS ARE HARDER TO MOVE bc RgD c 0.1 0.09 0.08 0.07 0.06 c * In the limiting case of coarse gravel of uniform size D, the modified Brownlie relation of Slides 3 and 4 predicts a critical Shields number c of 0.03, so that the boundary shear stress bc at which the gravel moves is given by the relation 0.05 0.04 0.03 0.02 silt 0.01

sand gravel 0 1 10 100 1000 10000 100000 1000000 Rep Now this uniform coarse gravel is replaced with a mixture of gravel sizes Di such that the geometric mean size of the surface layer (i.e. the layer exposed to the flow) Dsg is identical to the size D of the uniform gravel. It is further assumed (for the sake of simplicity) that each gravel Di in the mixture is coarse enough so that the critical Shields stress of uniform sediment with size Di would also be 0.03. 16 1D SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MORPHODYNAMICS with applications to RIVERS AND TURBIDITY CURRENTS Gary Parker November, 2004 SEDIMENT MIXTURES: COARSER GRAINS ARE HARDER TO MOVE contd. If every grain in the mixture acted as though it were surrounded by grains of the same size as itself, the critical Shields number sci for all sizes Di in the surface layer exposed to the flowwould be constant at 0.03, which would also be the critical Shields number scg for the surface geometric mean size Dsg. Thus the following relation would hold; sci scg 0.03 or

sci 1 scg If this were true the critical shear stresses bsci and bscg for sizes Di and Dg, respectively, in the surface layer would be given as bsci RgD i sci , bscg RgD sg scg or thus bsci Di bscg Dsg 17 1D SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MORPHODYNAMICS with applications to RIVERS AND TURBIDITY CURRENTS Gary Parker November, 2004 SEDIMENT MIXTURES: COARSER GRAINS ARE HARDER TO MOVE contd. So if every grain in the mixture acted as though it were surrounded by grains of the same size as itself, the critical Shields number sci would be the same for all grains in the surface, and the boundary shear stress bsgi required to move grain size Di would increase linearly with size Di. That is, if each grain acted as if it were not surrounded by grains of different sizes (grain independence), a grain that is twice the size of another grain would require twice the boundary shear stress to move. sci 1 , scg bsci

D i bscg Dsg The above grain-independent behavior is mediated by differing grain mass. That 18 is, larger grains are harder to move because they have more mass. 1D SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MORPHODYNAMICS with applications to RIVERS AND TURBIDITY CURRENTS Gary Parker November, 2004 SEDIMENT MIXTURES: HIDING EFFECTS Grains in a mixture do not act as though they are surrounded by grains of the same size. As Einstein (1950) first pointed out, on the average coarser grains exposed on the surface protrude more into the flow, and thus feel a preferentially larger drag force. Finer grains can hide behind and between coarse grains, so feeling a preferentially smaller drag force. These exposure effects are grouped together as hiding effects. Hiding effects reduce the difference in boundary shear stress required to move different grain sizes in a mixture. As a result, the relation for bsci is amended to bsci Di bscg Dsg where in general 0 < 1. 1 19 1D SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MORPHODYNAMICS with applications to RIVERS AND TURBIDITY CURRENTS Gary Parker November, 2004 SEDIMENT MIXTURES: HIDING EFFECTS contd. The relation bsci Di bscg 1 D sg

combined with the definitions yield the result bsci RgDi sci sci scg Di D sg , bscg RgDsgscg The value = 0 yields the case of grain independence: there are no hiding effects, the critical Shields number is the same for all grain sizes, and the boundary shear stress required to move a grain in a mixture increases linearly with grain size. The value = 1 yields the equal threshold condition: hiding is so effective that it completely counterbalances mass effects, all grains in a mixture move at the same critical boundary shear stress, and critical Shields number increases as grain size Di to the 1 power. In actual rivers the prevailing condition is somewhere between grain independence 20 and the equal threshold condition, although it tends to be somewhat biased toward the latter. 1D SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MORPHODYNAMICS with applications to RIVERS AND TURBIDITY CURRENTS Gary Parker November, 2004 CRITICAL SHIELDS STRESS FOR SEDIMENT MIXTURES Consider a bed consisting of a mixture of many sizes. The larger grains in the mixture are heavier, and thus harder to move than smaller grains. But the larger grains also protrude out into the flow more, and the smaller grains tend to hide in between them, so rendering larger grains easier to move than smaller grains. Mass effects make coarser grains harder to move than finer grains. Hiding effects make coarser grains easier to move than finer grains. The net residual is a mild

tendency for coarser grains to be harder to move than finer grains, as first shown by Egiazaroff (1965). Let Dsg (Ds50) be a surface geometric mean (surface median) size, and let scg* (sc50*) larger grains protrude more denote the critical Shields number needed to move that size. The critical Shields number smaller grains hide * sci need to move size Di on the surface can between larger ones be related to grain size Di as follows: sci scg Di D sg or sci sc 50 D i Ds50 u where varies from about 0.65 to 0.90 (Parker, in press). 21

1D SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MORPHODYNAMICS with applications to RIVERS AND TURBIDITY CURRENTS Gary Parker November, 2004 CRITICAL SHIELDS STRESS FOR SEDIMENT MIXTURES contd. Now let bscg (bsc50) denote the (dimensioned) critical shear stress needed to move size Dsg (Ds50), and bsci denote the (dimensioned) critical shear stress needed to move size Di in the mixture exposed on the bed surface. By definition, then, scg bscg RgDsg , sc 50 bscg RgDs50 , sci bsci RgDi Reducing the above relations with the relations of the previous slide, i.e. sci Di scg Dsg

or Di sci sc 50 Ds50 larger grains protrude more smaller grains hide between larger ones it is found that: bsci Di bscg Dsg u 1 or Di bsci bsc 50 Ds50 1 22 1D SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MORPHODYNAMICS with applications to RIVERS AND TURBIDITY CURRENTS Gary Parker November, 2004 LIMITS OF EQUAL THRESHOLD AND GRAIN INDEPENDENCE Consider the sci Di Di

sci or relations scg Dsg sc 50 Ds50 or bcsi Di bcsg Dsg 1 or D bcsi i bcs50 Ds50 If = 1 then all surface grains 1 1 bsci D D sci i sci i move at the same absolute or 1 or

or bscg sc 50 Ds50 value of the boundary shear scg Dsg stress (equal threshold): If = 0 then all surface grains move independently of each other, as if they did not feel the effects of their neighbors (grain independence): sci 1 or scg sci 1 sc 50 or bsci bscg D i D sg larger grains protrude more 1 bsci 1 bsc 50 u smaller grains hide

between larger ones 1 or D bsci i bsc 50 Ds50 1 In most gravel-bed rivers coarser surface grains are harder to move than finer surface grains, but only mildly so ( is closer to 1 than 0, but still < 1). 23 1D SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MORPHODYNAMICS with applications to RIVERS AND TURBIDITY CURRENTS Gary Parker November, 2004 CRITICAL SHIELDS NUMBER FOR SEDIMENT MIXTURES 10 xx sci scg equal threshold grain independence gamma = 0.85 1 0.1 0.1 1 Di/Dsg 10 24 1D SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MORPHODYNAMICS with applications to RIVERS AND TURBIDITY CURRENTS

Gary Parker November, 2004 CRITICAL BOUNDARY SHEAR STRESS FOR SEDIMENT MIXTURES 10 xx bsci bscg equal threshold grain independence gamma = 0.85 1 0.1 0.1 1 Di/Dsg 10 25 1D SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MORPHODYNAMICS with applications to RIVERS AND TURBIDITY CURRENTS Gary Parker November, 2004 A SIMPLE POWER LAW MAY NOT BE SUFFICIENT Several researchers (e.g. Proffitt and Sutherland, 1983) have found that a simple power law is not sufficient to represent the relation for the critical Shields stress for mixtures. More specifically, it is found that the curve flattens out as Di/Dsg becomes large. That is, the very coarsest grains in a mixture approach the condition of grain independence, with a critical Shields number near 0.015 ~ 0.02 (e.g. Ramette and Heuzel, 1962). The bedload transport relation of Wilcock and Crowe (2003), presented in Chapter 7, captures the essence of this trend; large amounts of sand render gravel easier to move. 10 x sci scg 1 0.1

0.1 1 Di / Dsg x 10 26 1D SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MORPHODYNAMICS with applications to RIVERS AND TURBIDITY CURRENTS Gary Parker November, 2004 CONDITION FOR SIGNIFICANT SUSPENSION OF SEDIMENT In order for sediment to be maintained in suspension to any significant degree, some measure of the characteristic velocity of the turbulent fluctuations of the flow must be at least of the same order of magnitude as the fall velocity vs of the sediment itself. Let urms denote a characteristic near-bed velocity of the turbulence (rms stands for root-mean-squared), defined as 2 urms 1 2 u v2 w 2 3 z b where u, v and w denote turbulent velocity fluctuations in the streamwise, transverse and upward normal directions and z = b denotes a near-bed elevation such that b/H << 1, where H denotes depth. A loose criterion for the onset of significant turbulence is then urms ~ v s In the case of a rough turbulent flow, the shear velocity near the bed can be evaluated as u2 uw z b

(e.g. Tennekes and Lumley, 1972; Nezu and Nakagawa, 1993). 27 1D SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MORPHODYNAMICS with applications to RIVERS AND TURBIDITY CURRENTS Gary Parker November, 2004 CONDITION FOR SIGNIFICANT SUSPENSION OF SEDIMENT contd. Since turbulence tends to be well-correlated (Tennekes and Lumley, 1972), the following order-of magnitude estimate holds; uw z b ~ 1 2 u v 2 w 2 3 z b from which it can be concluded that urms ~ u Based on these arguments, Bagnold (1966) proposed the following approximate criterion for the critical shear velocity u*sus for the onset of significant suspension (see also van Rijn, 1984); usus v s Dividing both sides by (RgD)1/2, the following criterion is obtained for the onset of significant suspension: Rf = Rf(Rep) defines the functional relationship for u2*sus v 2s 2 sus R f (Rep )

fall velocity given in Chapter RgD RgD 2 28 1D SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MORPHODYNAMICS with applications to RIVERS AND TURBIDITY CURRENTS Gary Parker November, 2004 SHIELDS DIAGRAM WITH CRITERION FOR SIGNIFICANT SUSPENSION 10 bedload and suspended load transport u v s negligible suspension 1 suspension bf50 c motion 0.1 bedload transport no motion silt 0.01 1.E+00 sand 1.E+01 gravel 1.E+02 1.E+03 Rep

1.E+04 1.E+05 1.E+06 29 1D SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MORPHODYNAMICS with applications to RIVERS AND TURBIDITY CURRENTS Gary Parker November, 2004 A NOTE ON THE MEANING OF THE THRESHOLD OF MOTION There is no such thing as a precise threshold of motion for a granular bed subjected to the flow of a turbulent fluid. Both grain placement and the turbulence of the flow have elements of randomness. For example, Paintal (1971) conducted experiments lasting weeks, and found extremely low rates of sediment transport at values of the Shields number that are below all reasonable estimates of the critical Shields number. In particular, he found that at low Shields numbers 16 qb 6.56 x 1018 where qb q RgD D b denotes a dimensionless bedload transport rate (Einstein number, discussed in more detail in the next chapter) and qb denotes the volume bedload transport rate per unit width. Strictly speaking, then, the concept of a threshold of motion is invalid. It is nevertheless a very useful concept for the following reason. If the sediment transport rate is so low that an order-one deviation from the rate would cause negligible morphologic change over a given time span of interest (e.g. 50 years for an engineering problem or 50,000 year for a geological problem), 30 the flow conditions can be effectively treated as below the threshold of motion. 1D SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MORPHODYNAMICS with applications to RIVERS AND TURBIDITY CURRENTS Gary Parker November, 2004 LOG-LOG PLOT OF PAINTAL BEDLOAD TRANSPORT RELATION

1.E-05 1.E-06 1.E-07 1.E-08 qb* 1.E-09 1.E-10 1.E-11 1.E-12 No critical Shields number is evident! 1.E-13 1.E-14 1.E-15 0.001 0.01 * 0.1 31 1D SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MORPHODYNAMICS with applications to RIVERS AND TURBIDITY CURRENTS Gary Parker November, 2004 LINEAR-LINEAR PLOT OF PAINTAL BEDLOAD TRANSPORT RELATION 3.E-06 3.E-06 qb* 2.E-06 2.E-06 For practical purposes c* might be set near 0.023. 1.E-06 5.E-07 0.E+00

0 0.005 0.01 0.015 0.02 0.025 * 0.03 0.035 0.04 0.045 32 1D SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MORPHODYNAMICS with applications to RIVERS AND TURBIDITY CURRENTS Gary Parker November, 2004 REFERENCES FOR CHAPTER 6 Bagnold, R. A., 1966, An approach to the sediment transport problem from general physics, US Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 422-I, Washington, D.C. Brownlie, W. R., 1981, Prediction of flow depth and sediment discharge in open channels, Report No. KH-R-43A, W. M. Keck Laboratory of Hydraulics and Water Resources, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, USA, 232 p. Egiazaroff, I. V., 1965, Calculation of nonuniform sediment concentrations, Journal of Hydraulic Engineering, 91(4), 225-247. Einstein, H. A., 1950, The Bed-load Function for Sediment Transportation in Open Channel Flows, Technical Bulletin 1026, U.S. Dept. of the Army, Soil Conservation Service. Ikeda, S., 1982, Incipient motion of sand particles on side slopes, Journal of Hydraulic Engineering, 108(1), 95-114. Neill, C. R., 1968, A reexamination of the beginning of movement for coarse granular bed materials, Report INT 68, Hydraulics Research Station, Wallingford, England. Nezu, I. and Nakagawa, H., 1993, Turbulence in Open-Channel Flows, Balkema, Rotterdam, 281 p. Paintal, A. S., 1971, Concept of critical shear stress in loose boundary open channels, Journal of Hydraulic Research, 9(1), 91-113. Parker, G., Toro-Escobar, C. M., Ramey, M. and S. Beck, 2003, The effect of floodwater extraction on the morphology of mountain streams, Journal of Hydraulic Engineering, 129(11), 885-895.

33 1D SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MORPHODYNAMICS with applications to RIVERS AND TURBIDITY CURRENTS Gary Parker November, 2004 REFERENCES FOR CHAPTER 6 contd. Parker, G., in press, Transport of gravel and sediment mixtures, ASCE Manual 54, Sediment Enginering, ASCE, Chapter 3, downloadable from http://cee.uiuc.edu/people/parkerg/manual_54.htm . Proffitt, G. T. and A. J. Sutherland, 1983, Transport of non-uniform sediments, Journal of Hydraulic Research, 21(1), 33-43. Ramette, M. and Heuzel, M, 1962, A study of pebble movements in the Rhone by means of tracers, La Houille Blanche, Spcial A, 389-398 (in French). van Rijn, L., 1984, Sediment transport, Part II: Suspended load transport, Journal of Hydraulic Engineering, 110(11), 1613-1641. Schlichting, H., 1968, Boundary-Layer Theory, 6th edition. McGraw-Hill, New York, 748 p. Seminara, G., Solari, L. and Parker, G., 2002, Bedload at low Shields stress on arbitrarily sloping beds: failure of the Bagnold hypothesis, Water Resources Research, 38(11), 1249, doi:10.1029/2001WR000681. Shields, I. A., 1936, Anwendung der ahnlichkeitmechanik und der turbulenzforschung auf die gescheibebewegung, Mitt. Preuss Ver.-Anst., 26, Berlin, Germany. Tennekes, H., and Lumley, J. L., 1972, A First Course in Turbulence, MIT Press, Cambridge, USA, 300 p. Wiberg, P. L. and Smith, J. D., 1987, Calculations of the critical shear stress for motion of uniform and heterogeneous sediments, Water Resources Research, 23(8), 1471-1480. Wilcock, P. R., and Crowe, J. C., 2003, Surface-based transport model for mixed-size sediment, 34 Journal of Hydraulic Engineering, 129(2), 120-128.

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