SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 Lessons in Recruiting Under-Represented

SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 Lessons in Recruiting Under-Represented

SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 Lessons in Recruiting Under-Represented and Non-Traditional Students SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 Presenters Clayton Smith, Vice-Provost, Students & International, University of Windsor Richard Wiggers, Executive Director, Research & Programs, Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario 2 SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 Topics

Challenges in Recruiting Non-Traditional Students Importance of Assessment Youth in Transition (YITS) Survey Successful Initiatives Questions & Comments SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 Challenges in Recruiting Non-Traditional Students The postsecondary landscape has changed significantly in recent years Government has established incentives to increase enrolment of special populations (e.g., Aboriginal, college transfer, first-generation) Many of these groups do not have a history of attending PSE institutions And some are not reachable using traditional student

recruitment methods 4 SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 Substantial enrolment growth PSE Participation Rate Ontarians Aged 18-24 50 45 University College 40 Percentage 35 30

25 20 15 10 5 0 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000

2005 Sources: Statistics Canada PSIS (Enrolments), CAUBO (Funding). SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 Mass education in PSE Ontario Goal SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 Canada leads the OECD in PSE nd non-university attainment for main OECD countries, percentage of population aged 25-64, 2006 University and non-university attainment for main OECD countries, percentage of population aged 25-64, 2006 SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012

University participation 8 SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 College participation 9 SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 Developed by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Policy-oriented indicators of the skills and knowledge of 15-year-old students The skills measured are considered key outcomes of the educational process (Reading, Math, Science) Undertaken every three years beginning in 2000 10

SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 The PISA sample in Ontario Age 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011

2012 12 13 14 15 PISA 2000 (Reading) (Schools) (182) Students 4,258 (Rate) (77.2%) PISA 2003 (Math) (138) 3,230

(78%) PISA 2006 (Science) (120) 2,928 (81%) PISA 2009 (Reading) (171) 4,083 (80%) PISA 2012 (Math) ? ? ? 16

17 18 11 SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) Student & Parent surveys accompanied PISA 2000 (Cycle 1), as well as surveys of school staff Follow-up telephone surveys were administered: 17 years (2002) Cycle 2 19 years (2004) Cycle 3 21 years (2006) Cycle 4 23 years (2008) Cycle 5 24 years (2009) Literacy Test 25 years (2010) Cycle 6 12

SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 What was asked? Written surveys at Age 15 of student, parents and schools were paired with PISA assessments and provided baseline data on family and school background, personality, aspirations, etc. Subsequent telephone surveys focused on individual study habits and activities, completion of high school, etc. Later telephone surveys examined labour market and postsecondary pathways 13 SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 Research cohorts Age 2000

2001 2002 14 PISA OSSLT 15 5,557 16,935 16 YITS

17 4,290 2003 2004 18 YITS 19 3,859 2005 2006 2007

2008 YITS 21 3,253 22 YITS 23 2,697 25 2010

15,560 20 24 2009 Literacy 400 YITS 2,049 14 SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 CYCLE 4 (21) Gender Source: Mary Catharine Lennon, Huizi Zhao, Shunji Wang, Tomasz Gluszynski, Educational Pathways of Youth in Ontario: Factors Impacting Educational Pathways

(HEQCO: 2011) 15 SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 CYCLE 4 (21) Parental income Source: Mary Catharine Lennon, Huizi Zhao, Shunji Wang, Tomasz Gluszynski, Educational Pathways of Youth in Ontario: Factors Impacting Educational Pathways (HEQCO: 2011) 16 SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 CYCLE 4 (21) Parental education Source: Mary Catharine Lennon, Huizi Zhao, Shunji Wang, Tomasz Gluszynski, Educational Pathways of Youth in Ontario: Factors Impacting Educational Pathways (HEQCO: 2011) 17

SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 CYCLE 4 (21) Immigrant parents Source: Mary Catharine Lennon, Huizi Zhao, Shunji Wang, Tomasz Gluszynski, Educational Pathways of Youth in Ontario: Factors Impacting Educational Pathways (HEQCO: 2011) 18 SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 Immigrant Status 90.0 60.0 30.0 0.0 Recent Arrivals

(2002 to 2006) Arrivals Before 2002 Born in Canada Confirmed University Recent Arrivals (2002 to 2006) Arrivals Before 2002

Born in Canada Confirmed College Successful Not Successful Recent Arrivals (2002 to 2006) Arrivals Before 2002 Born in Canada Applied/Did Not Confirm

Recent Arrivals (2002 to 2006) Arrivals Before 2002 Born in Canada Did Not Apply Absent/Deferred/Exempt Year of Arrival: Recent Arrivals (less than 5 years in Canada) N= 2104 Arrivals before 2002 (longer than 5 years in Canada) N=3214, Born in Canada N=10242 19

SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 Racial groups & PSE pathways 80.0 Percentage of Students 70.0 60.0 50.0 40.0 30.0 20.0 10.0 0.0 East Asian South Asian South East Middle East (2483) (2520) Asian (492) (548)

White (4645) Mixed (716) Black (1457) Latin (253) Confirmed University 74.1 60.9 48.6

48.0 47.3 39.8 26.5 23.3 Confirmed College 8.5 16.0 18.3 16.1 14.2

14.5 21.9 21.7 Applied/Did Not Confirm 7.6 8.0 9.1 10.2 12.7 10.9

11.8 9.1 Did Not Apply to PSE 9.8 15.2 24.0 25.7 25.8 34.8 39.8 45.8

Confirmed University Confirmed College Applied/Did Not Confirm Did Not Apply to PSE 20 SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 Family income & PSE pathways 70.0 Percentage of Students 60.0 50.0 40.0

30.0 20.0 10.0 0.0 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2

1 Income Decile (10 is highest income and 1 is lowest income) Confirmed University Confirmed College Did Not Apply to PSE 21 SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 Importance of Assessment DATA - What puts the S in SEM Transactional data Recruitment and retention analysis Assessment of strategies, services and outcomes

22 SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 Creating a Data-Driven Enrollment Plan The Enrollment Data Agenda Alumni Research Placement Data Graduate Rates Retention Data Student Surveys Financial Aid Analysis Yield Data Admission Statistics Enrollment Strategies Active Alumni

Graduated Engaged, Satisfied Retained Graduation/ Career Development First Year Exp. & Retention Programs Enrolled Deposited Applied/Admitted Competitive Analysis Market Research Alumni engagement Prospective Students

Yield Recruitment Marketing 23 SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 The University of Windsor Story 24 SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 Ontario university sector Algoma University OCAD University Nipissing University UOIT

Trent University Laurentian University Lakehead University University of Windsor Wilfrid Laurier University Brock University Queen's University Ryerson University Carleton University University of Guelph McMaster University University of Waterloo University of Ottawa University of Western Ontario York University University of Toronto TOTAL F/T UG Students (2010/11)

F/T G Students (2010/11) F/T Faculty (2010/11) Expenditures ($000) (2010/11) 834 3,054 3,874 6,515 6,187 6,318 6,425 11,645 14,102 14,076 15,730

18,632 18,162 21,604 21,327 26,458 28,200 27,457 41,012 56,531 348,143 0 44 59 308 354 407 578 1,658 908 932

3,580 1,893 2,778 2,287 3,354 3,486 4,611 4,782 3,841 13,195 49,055 40 102 174 144 225 462 309 516 513

543 792 927 819 777 1,299 1,089 1,293 1,491 1,398 2,667 15,580 $36,405 $60,182 $93,835 $184,591 $158,298 $163,014 $178,669 $329,656

$304,138 $299,686 $797,976 $510,272 $534,690 $711,150 $1,108,375 $855,463 $1,044,189 $1,102,219 $990,967 $3,011,858 $12,475,633 25 SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 University of Windsor Comprehensive university 9 Faculties

16,000 students 10% international students 1/3 part time students More than half local students 40% First Generation students 26 SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 First Generation (FG) Students Ontario Premier Dalton McGuinty announced that education will top the Provinces agenda This led to an infusion of $6.2 billion into the Ontario post-secondary education system and One of the top priorities became support for the outreach, recruitment and retention of first generation students $30-million, three-year investment to help first

generation students pursue a postsecondary education. 27 SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 The University of Windsor First Generation Project Marketing & Student Recruitment Make the Cut! Connecting4Success 28 SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 Marketing & Student Recruitment Marketing: Posters developed for high schools and local community

organizations Series of advertisements in local community newspapers outlining the benefits of PSE and available financial supports Student Recruitment: Included with the offers of admission a brochure that addresses issues of concern most common to FG students and their families 29 SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 30 SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 31

SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 32 SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 33 SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 34 SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 35 SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 Results Unable to assess the impact of this effort due to a lack

of data identifying FG students Subsequently, the Ontario Universities Application Centre added a question to the application for admission asking students to self identify if they are FG students 36 SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 Make the CUT! Provided FG students with an opportunity to experience postsecondary campus life while still in high school Joint program between the University of Windsor, St. Clair College, the Greater Essex County District School Board, and the Windsor-Essex Catholic District School Board Funded by the Ontario Governments Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities

37 SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 The Program A multi-day summer experience on campus between Grade 10 and 11 On-going peer mentoring from current college or university students during their semester on campus Transit Windsor passes for the duration of the oncampus component Free tuition and textbooks for one course at St. Clair College or the University of Windsor A co-op placement on campus institution 38 SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 The Program (Contd)

Students speak with Grade 10 career classes during their Grade 12 year The University and College provide targeted student support services to students who attend their institution 39 SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 Participating Students W.F. Herman Secondary School: Applicants: 35 Participants: 19 St. Josephs Catholic High School: Applicants: 19 Participants: 19 TOTAL: 36

40 SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 41 SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 42 SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 Connecting4Success Connecting4Success is a mentorship program that provides incoming FG students with personalized attention to support their successful transition to

university Advice Gurus consist of supportive senior level students and professional staff http://www.uwindsor.ca/connecting4success/ 43 SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 Participating Students 2011/12 180 mentors (many participated as mentees the prior year) 179 mentees Mentors receive co-curricular transcript recognition and some program incentives, but no direct honorariums or stipends for

their participation. 44 SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 Testimonials Mentees "It was great to be part of Connecting4Success group! Thanks for running this program and eagerly waiting to become Advice Guru this time :) " - Arvinder "Thank you again for running this program - I think it's a great way to help others and make friends! - Jenn "I will also be applying to become a Mentor for next year. I believe that everyone should have the same

opportunity; it was such a great experience and a lot of fun! Keep up the great work :)" - Zeinab 45 SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 Mentee Learning Outcomes Knowledge of campus resources Aware of academic/classroom expectations Understand the challenges of first semester Develop an appreciation for time management, enhanced learning strategies and goal setting Learn about campus culture and extracurricular opportunities Develop the utilization of purposeful behaviours that contribute student success 46 SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012

Testimonials Advice Gurus "More than giving back to my university, I actually learned more from my mentee than I thought possible! - Elizabeth "Thanks again for asking me to be involved in this program; I loved every minute of it". -Amanda It has been a pleasure being part of such a great program. It enhanced my leadership and communication skills, and I'm glad to have been able to help out fellow students". - Ndaya 47

SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 Mentor Learning Outcomes Increase knowledge of campus resouces Enhance interpersonal skills Engage in self awarneness and collaboration Develop leadership skills Improve oral and communication skills Experience intellectual growth 48 SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 Results Retention rate Control Group Program Group

67% 71.4% Cumulative GPA (13 point 6.6 scale) 7.0 Good academic standing 70% 79.6% Academic probation 18% 10.2%

C4S assists incoming students with their transition to university enhancing their first-year student experience, which in turn contributes to student persistence. 49 SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 Leaver rates colleges 50 SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 Leaver rates universities 51 SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 Lessons Learned

1. Access and success should not be targeted in isolation. The barriers and obstacles are the same. Placing too much emphasis on access can be problematic if students do not persevere and fail to meet their educational goals. 2. Providing financial supporteven if it is in the form of need-based grants rather than student loansis not enough. The financial barriers to PSE participation are compounded by other factors academic performance, individual behavior and environmental circumstances. 52 SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 Lessons Learned (Contd) 3. The enrolment funnel and student life cycle experience is different for different groups of students. Recruitment strategies need to be

customized to meet the needs of each special population group. 4. There is a need for both specialized/targeted student support programs and services as well as the integration of under-represented groups into regular programming and campus activities. 53 SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 Lessons Learned (Contd) 5. There is a need for longer term resource commitment to ensure that the strategies we put in place have a lasting impact. 6. Assessment is key to determining the success of initiatives we may wish to undertake, but data is often difficult to come by. Targeted communities sometimes are reluctant to self-identify, which takes it hard to set goals for enhancing the recruitment and

retention of these groups. 54 SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 Resources Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario, http://www.heqco.ca/ Canadian SEM Resource Library, http://www.uwindsor.ca/sem/ 55 SEM CONFERENCE Orlando, 2012 Comments & Questions Richard Wiggers, [email protected] Clayton Smith, csmith[email protected]

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