Strategic Plan Evaluation

Strategic Plan Evaluation

SEM Advisory Committee Workshop September 30, 2017 1 Overview/Agenda TOPIC TIME Breakfast 9:00-9:30 Welcome and Introductions 9:30-9:45 Why SEM? SEM reset Current Enrollment / Budget Implications 9:45-10:00 10:00-10:30 10:30-10:45 Break 10:45-11:00 Community/College Data/Observations 11:00-12:15 Lunch 12:15-12:45 SOAR / GAP analysis 12:45-2:15 Wrap Up / Next Steps 2:15-2:30 2 Welcome and Introductions Select a partner and answer the following two questions: What does Palomar do well? Your Homework!!!

Why do you care about the future of Palomar? On one of your note pads, write down a few reasons why you care about the future of our college? Then come to the front of the room and attach your notes to the board. 3 SEM Reset Role of our Committee SEM Purpose Statement and Framework SEM Planning The critical difference between SEM and other types of planning is the focus SEM planning places on optimizing enrollment, while improving success outcomes and maintaining fiscal viability. SEM done wellprovides for an infrastructure that allows colleges to adapt to their changing environments 4 Why SEM? 5 Why SEM? 2017-18 BUDGET REPORT Ron Perez 6 Implications What struck you about the Budget Report? Considering the budget, both revenue (FTES) and expenditures, what are the implications for us short-term? Long-term? 7 Community and Palomar College Observations Informed by Data; Guided by Discussion

8 LETS SOAR! Strengths: What can we build on? What do we do well as it relates to SEM? Opportunities: What is our community/students looking for? Where can we improve or even innovate? Aspirations: What do we care deeply about? Considering our strengths and opportunities, who should we become? What can we do to make a difference? Results: How do we know we are succeeding? 9 Our District: The Community We Serve Labor Market Information 10 Our District: The Community We Serve Palomar Community College District covers 2,550 square miles! Larger than the state of Delaware. Q: How many adults (18-64) live in our district? A: About 547,023! 11 Palomar College District Adult Population (N~547,023) Demographic

% Gender Female 51.2% Male 48.8% Total 100.0% Race/Ethnicity African American American Indian Asian & Pac Islander Hispanic White, NonHispanic Other Total Age 18-19 20-29 30-39 40-49 50-59 60-64 Total 3.7% 0.5% 12.1% 30.9% 50.1% 2.7% 100.0% 4.6% 26.4% 20.1% 19.4% 20.8% 8.8% 100% Higher concentration of Asian/Pac Islander reside Southern portion of the district.

81% Hispanic or White. 18-19 represent just 4.6% of our adult population, but generate about 35% of our FTES. 46% of the population 20-39; 30% over 50. Our District: The Community We Serve Estimates of Educational Attainment (N= 629,937) 50% 45% 40% 35% A little more than 1/3 have high school degree or less About 1/3 have some college or an AA degree A little less than 1/3 have a bachelors degree or higher 30% 25% 21.9% 24.3% 19.5% 20% 15% 10% 14.4% 9.6% 10.3% 5% 0% 13

Our District : The Community We Serve Educational Service Area Higher percentage (47%)Attainment of residents inby southern region of the district 50% have a bachelors degree or higher compared to the central (23.5%) and northern (20.8%). 40% 30% 28.8% 27.9% 25.0%25.1% 22.3% 22.2% 20% 10% 16.2% 18.8% 18.2% 16.6% 14.8% 16.2% 10.0%11.0% 7.0%

6.4% 6.0% 7.3% 0% North Data Source: SANDAG 2016 Estimates Central South 14 Our District: The Community We Serve Projecting about a 2.4% increase in adult population Adult Population Projections 600,000 590,000 580,000 570,000 560,000 550,000 540,000 530,000 520,000 510,000 500,000 With 559,940 547,023 546,608 2016 Estimate

2020 Forecast ***Significant increases in: Hispanic population ages 30-39 ages 60 and above 2035 Forecast Data Sources: SANDAG 2016 Estimate; SANDAG Series 13 Forecasts 15 Our District: The Community We Serve # of Graduates Actual and Projected High School Graduates in San Diego County 40,000 35,000 30,000 25,000 20,000 15,000 10,000 5,000 0 20 1 14 3 20 1 15 4

20 1 16 5 Data Source: Department of Finance (2016 Series) 20 1 17 6 20 1 18 7 20 2 21 0 20 2 22 1 20 2 23 2

20 2 24 3 20 2 25 4 20 2 26 5 16 Labor Market 17 The Labor Market SD County Jobs Job Openings over the 10-Year Period 3,000,000 12% Growth 2,500,000 Job Turn Over by 2026

2,000,000 1,500,000 1,000,000 500,000 0 20 16 20 26 1 Y 0- rG ro w th (N et N Data Source: Economic Modeling Specialists, INC (EMSI): 2017.3 Release New Jobs ) created by bs o J 2026 ew

Re ac pl + em en ts ur (T n e ov = r) N ew Jo b s+ Re a pl ce

m en ts 18 The Labor Market Data Source: Economic Modeling Specialists, INC (EMSI): 2017.3 Release Industry Groups in San Diego County NAICS Code 62 72 54 90 44 23 81 61 48 53 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Health Care and Social Assistance Accommodation and Food Services Professional, Scientific, and Technical Services Government Retail Trade Construction Other Services (except Public Administration)

Educational Services Transportation and Warehousing Real Estate and Rental and Leasing 194,849 172,379 201,334 341,935 182,326 103,939 110,847 47,694 44,681 108,057 250,146 200,849 228,179 362,981 196,659 117,444 123,699 59,688 54,757 117,143 55,297 28,470 26,845 21,046 14,333 13,505 12,852 11,994 10,076 9,086 28% 17% 13% 6% 8% 13%

12% 25% 23% 8% 56 11. Admin & Support & Waste Manage & Remediation Services 122,379 131,385 9,006 7% 71 31 99 42 52 55 21 51 22 11 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation Manufacturing

Unclassified Industry Wholesale Trade Finance and Insurance Management of Companies and Enterprises Mining, Quarrying, and Oil and Gas Extraction Information Utilities Crop and Animal Production 53,496 115,975 7,452 55,245 85,835 23,361 798 30,421 5,538 15,158 2,023,698 60,887 122,260 12,555 60,229 90,588 27,164 987 30,105 4,964 13,277 2,265,941 7,391 6,285 5,103 4,984 4,753 3,803 189 (316) (574) (1,881)

242,243 14% 5% 68% 9% 6% 16% 24% (1%) (10%) (12%) 19 12% Industry 2016Jobs Totals 2026Jobs Change %Change Tops 25 Jobs Requiring On-the-Job Training (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13)

(14) (15) (16) (17) (18) (19) (20) (21) (22) (23) (24) (25) SOC Occupational Description 35-3021 41-2031 41-2011 35-3031 37-2011 41-9022 37-2012 43-9061 39-9021 43-4051 35-2014 43-5081 43-6014 53-7062 39-9011 37-3011 35-2021 43-3031 33-9032 53-3041 39-2021 47-2061 39-3091 41-3099 43-4171

Combined Food Preparation and Serving Workers, Including Fast Food Retail Salespersons Cashiers Waiters and Waitresses Janitors and Cleaners, Except Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners Real Estate Sales Agents Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners Office Clerks, General Personal Care Aides Customer Service Representatives Cooks, Restaurant Stock Clerks and Order Fillers Secretaries and AAs, Except Legal, Medical, and Executive Laborers and Freight, Stock, and Material Movers, Hand Childcare Workers Landscaping and Groundskeeping Workers Food Preparation Workers Bookkeeping, Accounting, and Auditing Clerks Security Guards Taxi Drivers and Chauffeurs Nonfarm Animal Caretakers Construction Laborers Amusement and Recreation Attendants Sales Representatives, Services, All Other Receptionists and Information Clerks Median H ourly E arning s L ow High $32.23 $111.86 Top 25% $22.49 $32.14 Upper Middle 25% $16.70 $22.47 L ower Middle 25% $7.70 $16.69 B otto m 25% Median Annual Annual Hourly Openings Earnings Earnings

8,430 7,685 6,920 6,503 4,715 4,170 4,019 3,831 3,640 3,067 2,942 2,867 2,846 2,775 2,443 2,401 2,267 2,199 2,173 2,097 2,077 1,949 1,919 1,715 1,709 $10.87 $12.40 $10.68 $14.22 $11.95 $19.55 $10.46 $16.10 $10.86 $17.57 $12.21 $11.70 $18.20 $12.71 $9.61 $12.51 $11.05

$20.46 $12.34 $8.67 $13.68 $15.61 $10.87 $23.72 $15.38 $22,602 $25,789 $22,223 $29,572 $24,851 $40,674 $21,766 $33,482 $22,591 $36,550 $25,407 $24,338 $37,859 $26,433 $19,995 $26,020 $22,984 $42,551 $25,671 $18,040 $28,458 $32,464 $22,606 $49,331 $31,982 Data Source: Economic Modeling Specialists, INC (EMSI): 2017.3 Release 20

Tops 25 Jobs Requiring a Certificate (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) (17) (18) (19) (20) (21) (22) (23) (24) (25) SOC Occupational Description 31-1014 39-5012 53-3032 31-9092 49-3023 39-5092 29-2061 31-9091 31-9011 49-2022 49-9021

33-2011 39-5094 29-2041 31-9097 29-2071 25-4031 39-5011 49-3011 31-9094 27-4011 29-2055 49-2094 29-2057 23-2091 Nursing Assistants Hairdressers, Hairstylists, and Cosmetologists Heavy and Tractor-Trailer Truck Drivers Medical Assistants Automotive Service Technicians and Mechanics Manicurists and Pedicurists Licensed Practical and Licensed Vocational Nurses Dental Assistants Massage Therapists Telecomm Equip Installers and Repairers, Except Line Installers Heating, AC, and Refrigeration Mechanics and Installers Firefighters Skincare Specialists Emergency Medical Technicians and Paramedics Phlebotomists Medical Records and Health Information Technicians Library Technicians Barbers AircraftMechanics and Service Technicians Medical Transcriptionists Audio and Video Equipment Technicians Surgical Technologists Electrical and Electronic Repair, Commercial and Industrial Equip Ophthalmic Medical Technicians Court Reporters Median H ourly E arning s L ow

High $32.23 $111.86 Top 25% $22.49 $32.14 Upper Middle 25% $16.70 $22.47 L ower Middle 25% $7.70 $16.69 B otto m 25% Median Annual Annual Hourly Openings Earnings Earnings 1,706 1,438 1,403 1,258 794 647 607 556 546 383 375 250 242 228 217 174 174 172 127 117 117 87 74 59 57 $14.32 $12.01

$18.90 $17.41 $17.87 $9.63 $25.87 $20.41 $14.50 $26.74 $24.90 $29.28 $13.11 $13.87 $18.77 $21.52 $20.85 $11.91 $29.72 $14.56 $17.61 $27.50 $30.07 $19.44 $24.88 $29,778 $24,975 $39,308 $36,223 $37,165 $20,031 $53,812 $42,444 $30,164 $55,617 $51,783 $60,902 $27,276 $28,850 $39,043 $44,763 $43,368 $24,776 $61,817

$30,282 $36,632 $57,194 $62,546 $40,445 $51,751 Data Source: Economic Modeling Specialists, INC (EMSI): 2017.3 Release 21 Tops 25 Jobs Requiring an AA/AS (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) (17) (18) (19) (20) (21) (22) (23) (24) (25)

SOC Occupational Descriptions 25-2011 15-1134 23-2011 29-2012 17-3023 29-2021 15-1152 43-4161 19-4099 17-3011 29-2034 17-3029 31-2021 29-2056 19-4091 29-1126 17-3022 19-4031 31-2011 17-3026 29-2032 17-3012 17-3027 49-9062 17-3013 Preschool Teachers, Except Special Education Web Developers Paralegals and Legal Assistants Medical and Clinical Laboratory Technicians Electrical and Electronics Engineering Technicians Dental Hygienists Computer Network Support Specialists Human Resources Assistants, Except Payroll and Timekeeping Life, Physical, and Social Science Technicians, All Other Architectural and Civil Drafters Radiologic Technologists Engineering Technicians, Except Drafters, All Other

Physical Therapist Assistants Veterinary Technologists and Technicians Environmental Science and Protection Technicians, Including Health Respiratory Therapists Civil Engineering Technicians Chemical Technicians Occupational Therapy Assistants Industrial Engineering Technicians Diagnostic Medical Sonographers Electrical and Electronics Drafters Mechanical Engineering Technicians Medical Equipment Repairers Mechanical Drafters Median H ourly E arning s L ow High $32.23 $111.86 Top 25% $22.49 $32.14 Upper Middle 25% $16.70 $22.47 L ower Middle 25% $7.70 $16.69 B otto m 25% Median Annual Annual Hourly Openings Earnings Earnings 492 368 333 203 202 201 161 160 144 135 129 118

117 116 93 82 81 75 73 59 57 51 45 44 44 $14.20 $25.53 $30.52 $21.24 $30.71 $44.48 $31.46 $20.69 $23.27 $27.66 $34.96 $31.23 $32.56 $20.99 $22.89 $36.76 $27.86 $23.32 $34.80 $30.02 $45.09 $27.27 $30.67 $25.29 $28.31 $29,526 $53,112 $63,479

$44,179 $63,876 $92,526 $65,446 $43,035 $48,409 $57,540 $72,723 $64,951 $67,725 $43,667 $47,609 $76,461 $57,949 $48,506 $72,384 $62,432 $93,797 $56,730 $63,798 $52,593 $58,885 Data Source: Economic Modeling Specialists, INC (EMSI): 2017.3 Release 22 Tops 25 Jobs Requiring an Bachelors + (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9)

(10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) (17) (18) (19) (20) (21) (22) (23) (24) (25) S OC Oc c upatio nal D es c riptio ns 11-1021 11-9199 25-1099 29-1141 13-1111 13-2011 13-2052 13-1199 25-3099 25-2021 41-3031 13-1161 25-2031 25-3098 15-1132 11-3031 23-1011 27-2022 27-3043 27-1024 15-1133 11-1011

11-2022 27-3091 13-1071 G eneral and Operations Managers Managers , A ll Other P os ts econdary Teachers R egis tered Nurs es Management A nalys ts A ccountants and A uditors P ers onal F inancial A dvis ors B us ines s Operatio ns S pecialis ts , A ll Other Teachers and Ins tructors , A ll Other E lementary S chool Teachers , E xcept S pecial E ducatio n S ecuritie s , C ommoditie s , and F inancial S ervices S ales A gents Market R es earch A nalys ts and Marketing S pecialis ts S econdary S chool Teachers , E xcept S pecial and C TE S ubs titute Teachers S oftware D evelopers , A pplicatio ns F inancial Managers L awyers C oaches and S couts Writers and A uthors G raphic D es igners S oftware D evelopers , S ys tems S oftware C hief E xecutives S ales Managers Interpreters and Trans lators Human R es ources S pecialis ts Annual Opening s 2,237 2,085 1,936 1,814 1,712 1,666 1,617 1,411 1,288 1,203 1,136

1,078 1,044 867 863 863 792 756 653 649 643 635 607 569 562 Median H ourly E arning s L ow High $32.23 $111.86 Top 25% $22.49 $32.14 Upper Middle 25% $16.70 $22.47 L ower Middle 25% $7.70 $16.69 B otto m 25% Median Annual H ourly E arning s E arning s $48.56 $26.61 $34.74 $43.36 $36.32 $32.23 $31.24 $35.27 $20.87 $33.73 $22.35 $29.57 $35.27

$17.73 $49.34 $49.65 $53.68 $16.93 $18.94 $21.11 $54.37 $58.01 $45.60 $22.84 $30.94 $101,012 $55,344 $72,270 $90,193 $75,542 $67,034 $64,985 $73,356 $43,414 $70,157 $46,490 $61,514 $73,367 $36,870 $102,631 $103,265 $111,660 $35,217 $39,397 $43,913 $113,092 $120,658 $94,856 $47,507 $64,365 Data Source: Economic Modeling Specialists, INC (EMSI): 2017.3

Release 23 Reflection Break Any Thoughts?? 24 Community College Student Enrollment and Demographics 25 Palomar College Headcount and FTES *In reporting 2015-16 FTES to the state, Palomar shifted FTES to prior year and did not borrow from 2 nd summer. 26 Our Students: Places of Residence Fall 2016 Students' County of Residence County of Residence # San Diego County Within District Outside District Riverside County Other Countie s Out-of-State Grand Total 20,797 17,330 3,467 3,510 396 167 24,870

% 83.6% 69.7% 13.9% 14.1% 1.6% 0.7% 100.0% Data Source: MIS Submissions to CCCCO 27 High School of Graduation First Time Students High School Graduates in Palomar District by Enrollment District Bonsall Unified Borrego Springs Unified Escondido Union High Fallbrook Union High Julian Union Elementary Julian Union High Poway Unified Ramona City Unified San Marcos Unified Valley Center-Pauma Vista Unified Warner Unified Grand Total HS Enroll Enroll HS Enroll Enroll HS Enroll Enroll HS Enroll Enroll HS Enroll Enroll

Grads Palomar Rate Grads Palomar Rate Grads Palomar Rate Grads Palomar Rate Grads Palomar Rate 10-11 12-13 12-13 11-12 12-13 12-13 12-13 13-14 13-14 13-14 14-15 14-15 14-15 15-16 15-16 24 1 4.2% 65 1 1.5% 38 26 2 7.7% 24 1,901 840 44.2% 1,835 630 34.3% 1,780 681 38.3% 1,860 671 36.1% 1,874 688 36.7% 665 200 30.1% 514 162 31.5% 597 128 21.4% 462 105 22.7% 457 116 25.4% 186 2 1.1% 186 2 1.1% 186 2 1.1% 186 2 1.1% 186 2 1.1% 27 6 22.2% 27 6 22.2% 27 6 22.2% 27

6 22.2% 27 6 22.2% 2,604 442 17.0% 2,026 246 12.1% 2,108 206 9.8% 2,580 216 8.4% 2,461 179 7.3% 500 130 26.0% 423 102 24.1% 475 94 19.8% 404 86 21.3% 406 66 16.3% 1,100 530 48.2% 1,070 374 35.0% 1,200 381 31.8% 1,131 442 39.1% 1,136 348 30.6% 335 166 49.6% 328 89 27.1% 342 114 33.3% 282 103 36.5% 260 69 26.5% 1,521 505 33.2% 1,070 359 33.6% 1,399 329 23.5% 1,758 300 17.1% 1,510 317 21.0% 19 13

3 23.1% 13 1 7.7% 13 8,708 2,826 32.5% 7,408 1,965 26.5% 7,989 1,945 24.3% 8,707 1,940 22.3% 8,354 1,791 21.4% Data Sources: California Department of Education (CDE): HS Graduates (http://dq.cde.ca.gov/dataquest/) MIS Submissions to the CCCCO: MIS_SB :: MIS_SX SB11_Ed_Stat & SB12_Hs_Last 28 Community College Students in SD 29 Palomar College Students: Where do they come from? 30 What about our surrounding Colleges? 31 And the college to the north? 32 Our Districts Community College Students: Where do they go? 33 Has it always been this way? 34 Has it always been this way?

35 Reflection Key points Palomar serves 59% of the Districts residents attending a community college From 2002 to present overall net enrollment flow trends have reversed Over 8,000 residents from Southern portion of district attend a community college; Palomar serves 30% of these students while SDCCD serves 58% MiraCosta now draws more students from Palomar Palomar still attracts students from Mt. San Jacinto; however Mt. San Jacinto is building new comprehensive site off the Interstate 15 and has expanded its concurrent/dual enrollment offerings. 36 Palomar College Student Demographics Fall 2016 Palomar College District (N= 24,860) Demographic % Gender Female 47.4% Male 51.9% Unknown 0.7% Total 100.0% Race/Ethnicity Asian & Pac Islander African American Filipino Hispanic Native American White, NonHispanic

Multiethnic Other Total Age 17 & Under 18-19 20-29 30-39 40-49 50-59 60-64 65 & Over Total Full- & Part-Time Status NonCredit Part-Time Credit Full-Time Credit Total 5.2% 3.0% 2.4% 43.7% 0.7% 36.6% 4.5% 3.9% 100.0% 3.5% 21.7% 51.3% 11.4% 6.1% 3.7% 1.0% 1.2% 100% 7.0% 63.8% 29.2% 100%

Palomar has large CTE programs that have traditionally attracted males. Our Hispanic student population continues to grow over time. Our younger students critically important, as they generate significant FTES, however RememberAges 30-39 are expected to grow over time. Less than 30% of our students are full-time 37 Our Students: Student Status Students' EnrollmentStatus - Headcount* Fall 2016/ 2017 Comparison Fall 2016 Fall 2017 First-Time Student 4,771 4,878 First-Time Transfer Student 1,525 1,543 18 1.2 % Returning Student 2,972

2,868 -104 -3.5 % Continuing Student 13,053 12,328 -725 -5.6 % Spec ial Admit K-12 930 1,040 110 11.8 % 1,903 1,641 -262 -13.8 % 25,154 24,298 -856 -3.4 % StudentStatus

Non-Credit Total Fall 2016/ 2017 Fall 2016/ 2017 % Diff erence Change 107 2.2 % * Estimates as of Census Decreases Decreases in Continuing Students appears to be a trend. Decreases in NonCredit could be coming as a result of our current political environment. 38 Our Students: Demographics Do they represent our community? A little more info on Veterans! Younger Veterans (19-34) are over represented. Our Older Veterans (which there are many more of in San Diego) are under represented. Gender Female Male Age Under 20 20 to 29 30 to 49 50 or Over Race & Ethnicity African American Asian Hispanic

MultiEthnic Native American Pacific Islander White Unknown/Other Foster Youth No Yes Veterans No Yes Proportionality Index Palomar District* 46.8% 53.2% 50.2% 49.8% 0.93 1.07 24.5% 52.0% 17.5% 6.0% 16.6% 17.0% 28.1% 38.3% 1.48 3.07 0.62 0.16

3.1% 7.1% 43.3% 4.4% 0.6% 0.5% 37.7% 3.4% 2.0% 9.6% 32.5% 2.8% 0.7% 0.4% 51.7% 0.2% 1.55 0.74 1.33 1.57 0.84 1.26 0.73 17.09 98.5% 1.5% 99.6% 0.4% 0.99 3.88 93.7% 6.3% 90.3% 9.7% 1.04

0.65 * Data for Veterans and Foster Youth is available only at the county level. The county percentage for Foster Youth reflects the percentage of San Diego County children in Foster Care. 39 Data Source: MIS Submissions to CCCCO; SANDAG 2016 Estimates Reflection Break Any Thoughts?? Thinking strategically, what opportunities do we have to better serve our community? Are there any populations we should consider? How can we address the decreasing high school graduated attendance at Palomar. What is happening with our continuing students??? 40 Schedule, Courses, and Offerings 41 Course Offerings Fall Credit Course Offerings by Course Level 100.0% 90.0% 80.0% % Courses 70.0% 60.0% 50.0% 40.0% 30.0% 20.0% 10.0% 0.0% Fall 2014 Fall 2015

Fall 2016 Data Source: MIS Submissions to CCCCO 42 Course Offerings Fall Credit Offerings by Vocational Status 100.0% 90.0% 80.0% % Courses 70.0% 60.0% 50.0% 40.0% 30.0% 20.0% 10.0% 0.0% Fall 2014 Fall 2015 Fall 2016 Data Source: MIS Submissions to CCCCO 43 Course Offerings Fall Credit Offerings by Class Time 0 500 1,000 1,500

2,000 2,500 2,100 Day 1,927 1,934 774 Evening * Distance Ed 647 594 319 296 312 2014-15 2015-16 2016-17 Data Source: MIS Submissions to CCCCO * Online course offerings did increase in Spring 2017. 44 How much FTES does our schedule generate? What resources do we use to generate it? Productivity Metrics * 2014-15 2015-16 2016-17 Course Offerings 2,332 2,105 2,073 Census Load %

82.0% 87.5% 85.9% FTES 8,885 8,382 8,444 FTEF 606 556 543 WSCH/FTEF 440 453 490 Data Source: PAL FS320 Data Source: PAL FS320 * Fall estimates only Why is WSCH to FTEF important??? Why 525? 45 Student Outcomes 46 Course Success Rates (% A,B,C,CR) % Success Annual Success Rate by Year 100% 90% 80% 70% 79.0% 80.4% 78.6% 69.9%

70.3% 70.7% 70.3% 71.0% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% Summer 2014-15 2015-16 Fall Note*: Data for Spring 2017 is not available at the time of this report. Note*: Data for Spring 2017 is not available at the time of this report. DataData Source: MIS Submissions to CCCCO Source: MIS Submissions to CCCCO 2016-17* Spring 47 Course Success Rates by Level Annual Success Rate by Course Level 100% 90% 80% 72.3% % Success 70%

60% 61.2% 63.8% 63.5% 63.4% 64.3% 72.8% 73.2% 67.2% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 2014-15 Basic Skills 2015-16 AA Level 2016-17* Note*: Data for Spring 2017 is not available at the time of this report. Data Source: MIS Submissions to CCCCO Data Source: MIS Submissions to CCCCO Transfer 48 Awards Overall Awards by Type 2,500

2,000 1,983 1,870 1,672 1,752 1,740 1,696 1,625 1,951 1,891 1,475 1,500 1,000 280 233 180 0 545 433 500 2011-12 2012-13 Cert <18 Units

2013-14 Cert 18+ Units 2014-15 2015-16 AA/AS https:// sharepoint2.palomar.edu/sites/IRPA/SitePages/Degrees%20and%20Certifications.as 49 Average Time to Completion (AA/AST/Cert only*) Mean Time to Completion 4.2 4.4 Cert 18 t... 4.6 4.8 5 5.2 5.4 5.6 4.68 Cert 30 t... 5.21 5.4

Years Note*: Time to completion calculated for first-time-to-college students completing in AY 2016. Data Source: MIS Submissions to CCCCO 50 CSU/UC Transfer Volume by Year Transfers UC/CSU by Academic Year (N = 6,559) # of Transfers 1,400 1,250 1,200 1,144 1,131 1,077 1,000 848 800 600 400 272 260 200 0 2011-12 2012-13 UC 196 202

179 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16 CSU Data Sources: http://extranet.cccco.edu/Divisions/TechResearchInfoSys/Research/Transfer.aspx; CSU Analytic Studies 51 CSU/UC Transfers Top CSU Transfer Institutions CSUSM SDSU Top CSU majors Psychology Business Admin Kinesiology Accountancy Sociology Top UC Transfer Institutions UCSD* UC Irvine / UCLA Top UC majors

Political Science Psychology Computer Science Economics Biology / Cellular Biology *Annual UCSD Transfers have decreased from 145 (2011-12)52 to 95 (2015-16) Student Success Scorecard Metrics Completion or momentum points Broken down by demographic variables Prepared / Unprepared / Total Metrics Persistence 30+ Units Completion (SPAR) Remedial CTE Completion CDCP Skills Builder New This Year 1 and 2 Year Transfer Course Achievement Rates http://scorecard.cccco.edu/scorecardrates.aspx?CollegeID=061 53 Palomar College Scorecard Report Student Progress and Achievement Rates 100% 90% 80% 67.6% 70% 60%

52.1% 50% 45.5% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 2006-2007 69.3% 71.5% 65.4% 50.7% 50.4% 53.1% 43.6% 44.2% 45.2% 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010 69.5% 49.7% Prepared Remedial Overall 41.3% 2010-2011

Data Source: CCCCO Scorecard Data 54 Palomar College Scorecard Report Metric Last Years Rate Current Rate 3-Term Persistence 72.9% 68.7% 30+ Units 68.0% 68.1% Basic Skills Comp - English 43.1% 45.1% Basic Skills Comp Math 36.2% 36.3% Basic Skills Comp - ESL 24.6% 22.8%

English 1 year /2 year 48.5% / 65.8% 49.7% / 68.3% Math 1 year / 2 year 23.6% / 35.9% 23.2% / 35.4% Completion 53.4% 49.7% CTE Completion 51.0% 50.7% +14.4% +20.2% Increase / Decrease Momentum Points Transfer Level Ach Completion Skills Builder Increase in Salary NA 55

Equity Success Indicator Disproportionate Impact (DI) Access Veterans Course Completion Foster Youth Academic Standing ESL & Basic Skills Completion Degree & Certificate Completion Transfer to 4Year Institution Overall Measure DI Threshold DI Measure PI = 0.80 PI = 0.65 70.3%

56.2% 54.1% Foster Youth 79.2% 63.4% 60.3% African Americans (Math) 36.2% 28.9% 22.6% African Americans (Unprepared) 22.6% 18.1% 12.1% DSPS Students (Unprepared) 45.30% 36.2% 36.2% African Americans (Unprepared) 26.3%

21.0% 16.7% DSPS Students (Unprepared) 31.8% 25.4% 17.7% Data Sources: MIS Submissions to CCCCO (Term = Fall 2016); CCCCO Scorecard Data (Cohort Year = 2010); US Census Bureau: American Fact Finder Data 56 Reflection What are we doing well with respect to serving our students? What opportunities exist? Are we scheduling courses to meet the needs of our students? Do our programs meet their needs? Is there an opportunity around persistence and completion? Yes, I know we cant answer these questions fully! 57 Seriously Lets SOAR!!! 58 The Student Connection Connection From interest in college enrollment to application

Entry Enrollment to completion of first college-level course Progress Enrollment into program of study to 75% of requirement completion Completion Complete program of study to credential with labor market value 59 LETS SOAR! Strengths: What can we build on? What do we do well as it relates to SEM? Opportunities: Where can we improve or even innovate? Aspirations: What do we care deeply about? Considering our strengths and opportunities, who should we become? What can we do to make a difference? Results: How do we know we are succeeding? 60 Strengths What are our strengths? In a small group, ask one or two people to share What can we build on?

How do our strengths fit with the reality of our community and our students? examples or stories that shows Palomar at its best and when s/he felt proud to be a part of Palomar. Identify the themes across the examples/stories. Identify additional strengths to add to the themes. 61 Opportunities What are our opportunities? What can we improve or even innovate? What do we need to do differently? In your groups consider the following questions? How can we optimize enrollments and student success while at the same time remaining fiscally viable? What infrastructure should we have in place to accommodate changes in our environment? 62 Aspirations Considering our strengths, our opportunities, our community and our students, where do we

go in the future? What strategic initiatives would support our aspirations? In your small group, consider our strengths and opportunities. Where do we go in the future? What strategic initiatives will support our aspirations? 63 Results What measures will we use to let us know we are on track to meet our goals? Identify a list of indicators that would let us know if we are on track to meet our goals, optimizing enrollment (meeting enrollment targets), facilitating student persistence and success while, remaining fiscally viable. 64 Short-term, Mid-Term Long-term What themes emerged? Short-term strategies? Mid-term strategies?

Long-term strategies 65 Wrap Up and Next Steps Lunch meeting with small group who could not make it. Summarize our discussions. Need a small writing team to pull all the information together in preparation for next Thursdays meeting. 66 Timelines and Meeting Dates Workshops September 30th SEM Planning Retreat October 5th (3:00-7:00) Meetings 2nd meeting October 1 meeting in November 1 meeting in December 67 THE END! 68

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