Strategies used by the Federalists in the struggle for ...

Strategies used by the Federalists in the struggle for ...

The Federalists Lesson 14 LESSON OBJECTIVES EXPLAIN KEY ARGUMENTS OF THE FEDERALISTS DISCUSS THE RATIFICATION PROCESS TAKE AND DEFEND A POSITION ON THE RELEVANC AND VALIDITY OF FEDERALIST ARGUMENTS TODA

STRATEGIES USED BY THE FEDERALISTS IN THE STRUGGLE FOR RATIFICATION SPEED WAS OF THE ESSENCE THEY WANTED TO ORGANIZE MORE QUICKLY PENNSYLVANIADECEMBER 1787 WESTERN PART OF THE SATE COULD NOT ORGANIZE QUICKLY ENOUGH RATIFICATION WAS A DIFFICULT BITTER BATTLE NEW YORK WAS PARTICULARLY DIFFICULT

TO HELP JAY. HAMILTON AND MADISON WROTE ESSAYS AND LETTERS UNDER THE NAME PUBLIUS USED IN VIRGINIA ALSO FEDERALISTS USED SKILLED METHODS They present ideas in a way most Americans understood The suggested that the Constitution was a clear, well organized plan for the national government

The did not press the compromises or debates that took place The called it a new science of politics meaning the Anti-federalists were outdated RESPONDING TO THE FEARS OF THE ANTI-FEDERALISTS Many Americans agreed that a republican form of government would be

difficult for a large, diverse nation. History supported their concerns Republics had not faired well as they grew large Transformation of Rome from republic from monarchial empire How to solve the problem? Madison in Federalist No. 10 Faction is the greatest danger Turned Classical Republicanism upside down Deals with those who promote their own self-interest over common good

What is common good Does this still happen? DEALING WITH FACTIONS. If faction is a minoritythe majority would outvote them in a democracy Does this change modern day views about minority views If faction is the majority risk of majority tyranny in a democracy

How do we figure out what is then good for the republic? Madison: Large nation too many factions lead to no majority More fit characters to lead Good representatives enlarged or refined the constituents views, rather than just merely representing them. A republic could defect faction and representatives would see past narrow views

CENTRAL ARGUMENTS OF FEDERALISTS Civic Virtue cannot be relied upon as the sole support for government Danger to common good is selfish interests For centuries philosophers argued that a republican gov. needed civic virtue: common good above self interest Delegates felt civic virtue was not reliable State legislatures had passed laws helping those in debt while hurting

their creditors -- create property issues Constitution does not rest on civic virtue alone Federalists: unrealistic to expect those living so apart to sacrifice for others CENTRAL ARGUMENTS OF FEDERALISTS Constitutional checks and balances/sep of powers is the

best way to promote republicanism Believed that the way Senators and Representatives were elected would all ow for good government Filtering the peoples vote through the Electoral College ensured that the most capable people would be elected. Madison argued that State legislatures passed too many laws MORTONS CUSTOM DESIGNS

Representation of different rights will protect basic rights Legislative Branch: House: Represents the peoples interests as the are elected from small congressional districts Senate: Protects state interests as they are selected by State legislatures Executive Branch: President guards that national interests Electors chose him/her from the top choices Judicial Branch:

Ensures good judgement in national government Independent of political manipulation Answers only to the Constitution -- people when impeached RESPONSE TO A BILL OF RIGHTS National Government exercises only enumerated rights Nothing gave National Government authority over

individuals Bill of Rights implies the government has rights the Constitution does not give it Popular sovereignty give the people the power The people can remove those who abuse their SUCCESS OF RATIFICATION June 1788 9 states had voted to ratify

Neither Virginia or New York at that time had ratified Wealthy states Large populations Needed for the nation to survive Key geographical locations slit the nation in two New York was Americas primary commercial hub Compromise: Agreement to add a bill of rights during the first meeting of Congress Virginia June 26, 1788 89-79

Recently Viewed Presentations

  • Lecture 7 The Public Network Chapter Outline  Switched
  • Elements of a Greek Tragedy - Pearland Independent School ...

    Elements of a Greek Tragedy - Pearland Independent School ...

    Peripeteia. is a sudden reversal, often in fortune of the protagonist. Peripeteia is, therefore, the turning point in Greek tragedy. ... a Macbeth, a Lear, or a Cleopatra is brought to doom by excessive pride--hubris--a belief that he or she...
  • Railroad to Confederation

    Railroad to Confederation

    End of reciprocity treaty and corn laws = need for new markets. Fast way to move troops around. In case of USA invasion. Enable western expansion - Sea to Sea. Before USA would be able to annex North west. All...
  • SHRM/Achieve Survey Findings: Workforce Education Levels

    SHRM/Achieve Survey Findings: Workforce Education Levels

    This is the second part of a series of SHRM/Achieve survey findings titled "Changing Employee Skills and Education Requirements."These results look at the education levels of today's workforce.
  • Religion in australia post 1945 - mrachmar.com

    Religion in australia post 1945 - mrachmar.com

    Religious Expression in Australia - 1945 to present. Outline the changing patterns of adherence from 1945 to present using census data. Account for the present religious landscape in Australia in relation to: Christianity as the major religious tradition. immigration. denominational...
  • What the WCAG?

    What the WCAG?

    AODA is only provincial, no federal legislation yet… The idea was too broad and large to take on as a student project! As Boromir in Lord of the Rings would tell us…
  • Western Australian Curriculum: Technologies What is Mandated?  Curriculum

    Western Australian Curriculum: Technologies What is Mandated? Curriculum

    Notional Times. guidelines developed to assist schools and teachers to plan for and make decisions about how the curriculum is implemented. the curriculum is mandated; students need to be given adequate time in their timetable to cover the curriculum and...
  • Thematic PowerPoint: Music Part 2 - shshistory.com

    Thematic PowerPoint: Music Part 2 - shshistory.com

    Thematic PowerPoint: Music Part 2 ... a poet and inventor of photographic colour processes proposed that Scott's method be improved by photoengraving the trace onto metal with the possibility of retracing the pattern resulting in the replay of the original...