The Challenge: To Create More Value in All Negotiations

The Challenge: To Create More Value in All Negotiations

To appreciate this presentation [and NOTE: insure that it is not a mess], you need Microsoft fonts: Showcard Gothic,

Ravie, Chiller and Verdana Parts 6 and 7.1 Tom Peters EXCELLENC E. ALWAYS. New Master/21 August 2008 Slides at

tompeters.com Ten Parts P1.1, P1.2, P1.3, P1.4/Generic P2/Leadership P3/Talent P4/Value-added Ladder P5/New Markets P6/The Equations P7.1/Implementation P7.2/Action P8/13 Guru Gaffes

P9/Healthcare P10/The Lists Ten Parts P1.1, P1.2, P1.3, P1.4/Generic P2/Leadership P3/Talent P4/Value-added Ladder P5/New Markets P6/The Equations P7.1/Implementation P7.2/Action

P8/13 Guru Gaffes P9/Healthcare P10/The Lists part six Attending to the Last 98%: The New Management Science, or Hard Is Soft, Soft Is Hard

Alternate title Attending to the Last 98%: flower power! Tom Peters/09 April 2008 FLOWER POWER

Hold in your mind the idea of flower power more to come! S = ( ___ ) Success Is a Function of SF50: Success Is a Function of* ... *What follows are not in fact true mathematical formulae

obviously. Nonetheless, in tribute to my own scientific background, and, more important, that of many seminar SF50: 50 Equations on achieving success at pretty much anything S = (#&DR; -2L, -3L, 4L, I&E) Success is a function of: Number and depth of relationships

2, 3, and 4 levels down inside and outside the organization S = (SD>SU) Sucking down is more important than sucking upthe idea is to have the [your] entire organization working for you. S = (#non-FF, #non-FL) Number of friends not in my function S = (#XFL/m)

Number of lunches with colleagues in other functions per month S = (#FF) Number of friends in the finance organization Loser: Hes such a suck-up!

Winner: Hes such a suck-down. Never* waste a lunch! *More or less S =(#PKWP) S = (#PKLP)

# of people you know in the wrong places # people you know in low places ??????? Success doesnt depend on the number of people you know; it depends on the number of people you know in high places! or

Success doesnt depend on the number of people you know; it depends on the number of people you know in low places! It helps to know people in high

places! It helps more to know people in low places!

Gust Avarkotos boiler room CIA pals Walters enabler P.M. Thank You notes Flexirents XSecs Customer PA lunches Anybodys XSec Anybodys PA All customer Purchasing Dept receptionists Secy Chaffees letter writer McKinsey report prep staff McKinsey research staff Admirals Aide Congressional Committee staff drafter

Congressmans appropriate LA Anybody in Finance The previous entries are shorthand for stories about low level relationships determining high level decisionsor at least having surprising impact. Flexirent is an Australian consumer financial services company. Its offerings are mostly made through retailersand following the 80-20 rule, a small # of retailers control a large share of Flexirents business. The Executive Secretary-PA (Personal Assistant) to Flexirents CEO is a bright, energetic, outgoing person. Along the way, and not accidentally, she has developed very close relationships to the

Pas of most of the CEOs of Flexirents major customers. Among other things, she more or less regularly (quarterly, roughly) takes her PA pals out for lunch. The goal on both sides is clear, understood and shamelessto enhance unvarnished communications among these true power players. One can only imagine the number of times, over, say, five years, that this back channel (front Channel, in reality) has paved the way for success and staved off disasters. The rest of the entries on the slide are of the same ilk. S = (OF)

Number of oddball friends S = (PDL) Purposeful, deep listeningthis is very hard S = (DSTM, EH, TTAGFG) Dont shoot the messengerembrace him! Truth-tellers are gifts from God! S + (#EODD3MC)

Number of end-of-the-day difficult (youd rather avoid) 3minutecalls that sooth raw feelings, mend fences, etc. S = (UFP, UFK, OAPS) Unsolicited favors performed, UFs involving co-workers kids, overt acts politeness-solicitude toward co-workers spouses, parents, etc. Relationships (of all varieties)

: THERE ONCE WAS A TIME WHEN A THREE-MINUTE PHONE CALL WOULD HAVE AVOIDED SETTING OFF THE DOWNWARD SPIRAL THAT RESULTED IN A COMPLETE RUPTURE.

S= (TSHRO) Time spent ... Hurdle Removing for Others Peter Drucker once famously said, Ninety-percent of what we call management consists of making it difficult for people to get things done. There is more than a grain of truth to that. On the other side, and there can be an other side, I see the managers principal role as identifying things that get in peoples way (by asking them!) and meticulously getting those things out of their

way. Thence, you could cal the boss the CIRO, or Chief Impedance Reduction Officer, or my choice, CHR, Chief Hurdle Remover. In any event the idea is that this is a/the primary task the boss performsand that it is a systematic, pro-active affair (e.g., on the daily agenda). S = (A#C, PTS/OLC, SAPA) Absolute # of consultations, perception of being taken seriously (Responsible for one line of code), small acts of public appreciation

S = (1D) Seeking the assignment of writing first drafts, minutes, etc. (1787) S = (#SEAs) Number of solid relationships with Executive Assistants S = (%UL/w-m) % useful lunches per week, month

S = (FG, FOC-BOF, CMO) Favors given, favors owed collectively, balance of favors, conscious management thereof Buy inOwnershipAuthorial bragging rights-Born again One Line of Code! Champion =

It works this way, Tom. Youre talking to a guy whos important to implementation down where the rubber meets the road. Hes skepticalhe either really is, or its the act he chooses to play. You go over the thing with him and he has a thousand objections. You nod your head a lot, and take copious notes. Then you go back to your guys, and you find a few places where you can very specifically accommodate him. You make the changes, even if they are pretty ugly. Then you go back to him, and show him exactly what youve done. You have a born again supporter. You took him seriouslyand through the changes, hes now your co-inventor, your

savior. Now hes doing the selling for you. Hey, the whole damn thing wouldnt have worked were it not for his interjectionsthats the way he frames it to his folks. I tell you, it never fails. Source: Australian IS-IT chief, mid-sized company in financial services S = (SU) Showing up (Woody Allen, Delawares ridiculous influence on the Constitution of the USA) S = (KSU, R)

Keep showing up; relentlessness (U.S. Grant!!) S = (DW, TMSTTOG) Drill wells, try more stuff than the other guy (John Masters, Mike Bloomberg) Ninety percent of success is showing up.

Woody Allen This is so simple it sounds stupid, but it is amazing how few oil people really you only find oil if you drill wells. understand that You may

think youre finding it when youre drawing maps and studying logs, but you have to drill. Source: The Hunters, by John Masters, Canadian O & G wildcatter We made mistakes, of course. Most of them were omissions we didnt think of when we initially wrote the software. We fixed them by doing it over and over, again and again. We do the same today. While our competitors are still sucking their thumbs trying to make the design

perfect, were already on prototype version #5. By the time our rivals are ready with wires and screws, #10. It gets back to planning versus acting: We act from day one; others plan how to planfor months. Bloomberg by

we are on version Bloomberg S= (CM) Conscious calendar management (the calendar never lies) You = Your calendar*

*Calendars never lie! You must be the change you wish to see in the world. Gandhi

S = (CPRM, TS) Conscious-planned Relationship management, time spent thereon R.O.I.R . Far more important than ROI! Return On

Investment In Relationships FYI: Relationship power = Monopoly power The goal is clearan unfair share of attention

from an internal staffer, a vendor, a customer. We unabashedly pursue through good-betterbest relationshiops de facto monopolythe monopolization of other important folks love and affection, as it were. Sustainable competitive advantage = Relationship-based advantage (period.) FYI:

Some Resources: Relationships The Managers Book of Decencies: How Small Gestures Build Great CompaniesSteve Harrison RespectSara Lawrence-Lightfoot Hostmanship: The Art of Making People Feel Welcome Jan Gunnarsson & Olle Blohm (leader as host to hisher employees) The SPEED of Trust: The One Thing that Changes EverythingStephen M.R. Covey The Dream Manager Matthew Kelly The Customer Comes Second: Put Your People First and Watch Em Kick ButtHal Rosenbluth and Diane

McFerrin Peters (no relationbe delighted if she was) Crucial ConversationsKerry Patterson, Joseph Grenny, Ron McMillan, Al Switzler Crucial Confrontations Kerry Patterson, Joseph Grenny, Ron McMillan, Al Switzler Influence: Science and PracticeRobert Cialdini Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQDaniel Goleman A few of my favorite reads on this topic especially #1. The idea of competitiveadvantage-through-decency is extraordinary. Of course, we know thisbut to see it spelled

out this way may change the course of your professional life. S = (TN/d, FG/m, AA/d) Thank you notes per Day, flowers given per Month, Acts of Appreciation per Day S = (WLHAO) Willingness to laugh heartily at oneself

S = (PTA100%ATS, ENMF, TTT) Proactive, timely, 100% apologies for tiny screw-ups, even if not my fault (it always takes two to tango) S = (AMR, NBS-SG) Acceptance of mutual responsibilities for all affairs, no blameshifting, scape-goating S = (RP, PRP>>P) Never forget, and act accordingly: Response to the screwupproblem and perception thereof is (far, far) more important

than the problem itself! S = (APLSLFCT) Awareness, perception of little snubsand lightening fast correction thereof S = (TN/d, FG/m, AA/d) Thank you notes per Day, flowers given per Month, Acts of Appreciation per Day

S = (WLHAO) Willingness to laugh heartily at oneself S = (RP, PRP>>P) Never forget, and act accordingly: Response to the screwupproblem and perception thereof is (far, far) more important than the problem itself! S = (APLSLFCT) Awareness, perception of little snubsand lightening fast correction thereof

THE PROBLEM IS RARELY/ NEVER THE PROBLEM. THE RESPONSE TO THE PROBLEM INVARIABLY ENDS UP BEING THE REAL PROBLEM. PROBLEM S = (Thank you notes

per Day, flowers given per Month, Acts of Appreciatio per Week) The deepest human need is the need to be appreciated. William James Courtesies of a small

and trivial character are the ones which strike deepest in the grateful and appreciating heart. Henry Clay S = (PTA100%ATS, ENMF, TTT) Proactive, timely, 100% apologies for tiny screw-ups, even if not my fault (it always takes two to tango) S = (AMR, NBS-SG)

Acceptance of mutual responsibilities for all affairs, no blameshifting, scape-goating Im really sorry. Power phrase: Amazing how rare this iswhich of course is why its so powerful.

I screwed up. Power phrase: S = (G) Grace S = (GA) Grace toward adversary

S = (GW) Grace toward the wounded in bureaucratic firefights S = (PD) Purposeful decency S = (MBTSSMR) Purposeful management of this Soft Stuff by people reporting to me

S = (EC, MMO) Emotional connection, mgt & maintenance of S = (IMDOP) Investment in Mastery of detailed organizational processes What I learned from my years as a hostage negotiator is that we do not have to feel

powerlessand that bonding is the antidote to the hostage situation. George Kohlrieser, Hostage at the Table (GKs negotiation success rate is >95%)

S = (H-TS) Time spent on Hiring S = (TSPD, TSP-L1) Time spent on promotion decisions, especially for 1st level managers S = (%SS, H-PD) % soft stuff involved in Hiring, Promotion decisions

S = (%WLP) % women in leadership positions S = (TWA, P, NP) Time wandering around, purposeful, non-planned S = (SBS) Slack built into Schedule

AS LEADERS, WOMEN RULE: New Studies find that female managers outshine their male counterparts in almost every measure Womens Negotiating Strengths

*Ability to put themselves in their counterparties shoes *Comprehensive, attentive and detailed communication style *Empathy that facilitates trust-building *Curious and attentive listening *Less competitive attitude *Strong sense of fairness and ability to persuade *Proactive risk manager *Collaborative decision-making Source: Horacio Falcao, Cover story/May 2006, World Business, Say It

Like a Woman: Why the 21st-century negotiator will need the female touch This relationship stuff comes naturally to women (for starters, from the genes); and is painfully difficult for many-most men. TAKE THIS QUICK QUIZ: QUIZ Who manages more things at once? Who puts more effort into their appearance? Who usually takes care of the details? Who finds it easier to meet new

people? Who asks more questions in a conversation? Who is a better listener? Who has more interest in communication skills? Who is more inclined to get involved? Who encourages harmony and agreement? Who has better intuition? Who works with a longer to do list? Who enjoys a recap to the days events? Who is better at keeping in touch with others? Source: Selling Is a Womans Game: 15 Powerful Reasons Why Women Can Outsell Men, Nicki Joy & Susan Kane-Benson

S= (%TMTSS, PMTSS, DTDTSS) Q: But wheres the beef? is A: This the beef!

The terms hard facts, and the soft stuff used in business imply that data are somehow real and strong while emotions are weak and less important. George Kohlrieser, Hostage at the Table O(B) = (XX) O(B), the blueness of ones ocean [think Blue Ocean

Strategy, the popular book], is directly proportional to eXcellence in eXecution/XX ones , per me. [If one finds a strategic blue ocean, one will, especially in todays world, copied immediately; the only defensepossibility of sustaining successis XX/eXcellence in eXecution. Think EXXON MOBIL; they and their rivals know where the hydrocarbons arebut EXXON MOBIL handily out-executes the competition.]

Equations #48, #49 and #50 are more about organizational effectiveness than individual effectivenessand thus round out this brief presentation. S(O) = (XXFX) The single most important cause of failure to execute effectively is the lack of effective cross-functional communication-execution. Hence, Organizational Success is a eXcellence (X) in crossfunctional (XF) eXecution (X). Attached

function of as Appendix II is my: The XF-50: 50 Ways to Enhance CrossFunctional Effectiveness and Deliver Speed, Service Excellence and Value-added Customer Solutions. S(O) = (XSIT) In 1982 in In Search of Excellence, Bob Waterman and I wrote about the idea of MBWA, or Managing By Wandering Around; we came across MBWA at HewlettPackard, then a much smaller company, and it was love at first sight! For reasons described in Appendix III, I recently returned to the centrality of that notionand created a list of 50 Have Yous. That is, instead of worrying ceaselessly

about strategy and blue oceans, how good a job have you done at Staying In Touch with your extended internal and external organizational family? That is: S(O), X SIT, eXcellence at Staying In Touch. Organizational Success, is a function of Hard Is Soft Soft Is Hard Hard Is Soft (Plans,

# s) Soft Is Hard (people, customers, values, relationships)) If I could have chosen not to tackle the IBM culture head-on, I probably wouldnt have. My bias coming in was toward strategy, analysis and measurement. In comparison, changing the attitude and behaviors of hundreds of thousands of people is very, very hard. [Yet] I came to see in my

time at IBM that culture isnt just one aspect of the it is the game. game Lou Gerstner, Who Says Elephants Cant Dance

The tough-minded Mr Gerstner became a reluctant convert to the power of this soft stuff. FLOWER POWER End Part 6 Ten Parts P1.1, P1.2, P1.3, P1.4/Generic

P2/Leadership P3/Talent P4/Value-added Ladder P5/New Markets P6/The Equations P7.1/Implementation P7.2/Action P8/13 Guru Gaffes P9/Healthcare P10/The Lists Part 7.1

Tom peters on implementatio n Never forget implementation , boys. In our work, its what I call the last 98 percent of the client puzzle. Al McDonald, former

Managing Director, McKinsey & Co, to a project team, reported by subsequent McKinsey MD, Ron Daniel In this presentation you will find no less than 23 minipresentations on the topic of Implementationthat allimportant last 98 percent. One is a study of nothing less grand than the creation of the U.S. Constitution. Thats a long way from your world or mine. Or is it? Heres what I wrote at the beginning of the case study, Slide #325: What does the U.S. Constitutional Convention of 1787 have to teach you and me, in the Age of the Internet, about implementing our wee pet project?

A lot, Ill argue. Whether the topic is mundane or grand, and whether the date is 1787 or 2008, the essential human basics of implementation are exactly the same and overlooking them is the universal cause of failure. So lets look at the little human lessons that underpinned the creation of this monumental document Tom Peters On Implementation The Have You 50 MBWA/Calendars Never Lie Hard Is Soft. Soft Is Hard. Respect!

The Last 98%: 50 Equations Concerning Success Organizations Exist to Serve The 9Ps of Leadership Women Dominate the Economy: Implications for Implementation Women Rule: Implications for Implementation The XF-50: Enhancing Cross-functional Effectiveness Beyond Barriers: The PSF/Professional Service Firm Solution Beyond Barriers: The PSF 35 Getting Things Done: The Power & Implementation 34 The Checklist: The Power of a Blinding Flash of the Obvious Charlie Wilsons War: Lessons Learned Delivering Development Assistance Effectively: William Easterly

The Creation of the U.S. Constitution: The Summer of 1787 Excellence 4/40: 4 Ideas in 40 Years Excellence 1/40, 1 Idea in 40 Years: Try It! Presentation Excellence: The PresX56 Interviewing Excellence: The IntX31 Mastering Sales: The Sales25 The Sales122: 122 Ridiculously Obvious Thoughts About Selling Stuff The Have you 50

Mapping your competitive position or While waiting last week [early December 2007] in the Albany airport to board a Southwest Airlines flight to Reagan, I happened across the latest Harvard Business Review, on the cover of which was a yellow sticker. The sticker had on it the words Mapping your competitive position. It referred to a feature article by my friend Rich DAveni. His work is uniformly goodand I have said as much publicly on several occasions dating back 15 years. Im sure this article is good, too

though I didnt read it. In fact it triggered a furious negative Tom reaction as my wife calls it. Of course I believe you should worry But instead of obsessing on competitive position and other abstractions, as the B-schools and consultants would always have us do, I instead wondered about some practical stuff which I believe is more important to the short- and long-term health of the enterprise, tiny or enormous. about your competitive position.

Unfortunately many leaders of major companies believe their job is to create the strategy, organization and organization processesremaining aloof from the people doing the work. George Kohlrieser, Hostage at the Table (GK is, among other things,

a hostage negotiator with a 95% success rate) 1. Have you in the last 10 days visited a customer? 2. Have you called a customer TODAY? 3. Have you in the last 60-90 days had a seminar in which several folks from the customers operation (different levels, different functions, different divisions) interacted, via facilitator, with various of your folks? 4. Have you thanked a front-line employee for a small act of helpfulness in the last three days? 5. Have you thanked a front-line employee for a small act of helpfulness in the

last three hours? 6. Have you thanked a frontline employee for carrying around a great attitude today? 7. Have you in the last week recognizedpubliclyone of your folks for a small act of cross-functional co-operation? 8. Have you in the last week recognizedpubliclyone of their folks (another function) for a small act of cross-functional co-operation? 9. Have you invited in the last month a leader of another function to your weekly team priorities meeting? 10. Have you personally in the last week-month called-visited an internal or external customer to sort out, inquire, or apologize for some little or big thing that went awry? (No reason for doing so? If truein your mindthen youre more out of touch than I dared imagine.)

1. Have you in the last 10 days visited a customer? 2. Have you called a customer TODAY? Blog1231.07 FLASH! FLASH!

FLASH! FOR IMMEDIATE ACTION! FOR IMMEDIATE ACTION! FOR IMMEDIATE ACTION! OLD YEARS RESOLUTION! Call (C-A-L-L!) (NOT E-MAIL!) 25-50 (NO LESS THAN 25) people TODAY * to thank them for their support this year (2007) and wish them and their families and colleagues a Happy 2008! ** *** **** ***** ****** *Today = TODAY = N-O-W (not within the hour) **Remember: ROIR > ROI. ROIR = Return On Investment in Relationships.

Success = f(Relationships). ***This is the most important piece of advice I have provided this year. ****This is Not Optional. *****Trust me: This is fun!!!! ******Trust me: This works. Happy 2008!!! I posted this at tompeters.com on New Years Eve 2007.

11. Have you in the last two days had a chat with someone (a couple of levels down?) about specific deadlines concerning a projects next steps? 12. Have you in the last two days had a chat with someone (a couple of levels down?) about specific deadlines concerning a projects next steps and what specifically you can do to remove a hurdle? hurdle? (Ninety percent of what we call management consists of making it difficult for people to get things done.Peter His eminence Drucker.) 13. Have you celebrated in the last week a small (or large!) milestone reached? (I.e., are you a milestone fanatic?) 14. Have you in the last week or month revised some estimate in the wrong direction and apologized for making a lousy estimate? (Somehow you must publicly reward the telling of difficult truths.) truths.)

15. Have you installed in your tenure a very comprehensive customer satisfaction scheme for all internal customers? (With major consequences for hitting or missing the mark.) 16. Have you in the last six months had a week-long, visible, very intensive visit-tour of external customers? 17. Have you in the last 60 days called an abrupt halt to a meeting and ordered everyone to get out of the office, and into the field and in the next eight hours, hours, after asking those involved, fixed (f-i-x-e-d!) a nagging small problem through practical action?

18. Have you in the last week had a rather thorough discussion of a cool design thing someone has come acrossaway from your industry or functionat a Web site, in a product or its packaging? 19. Have you in the last two weeks had an informal meetingat least an hour longwith a frontline employee to discuss things we do right, things we do wrong, what it would take to meet your mid- to long-term aspirations? 20. Have you had in the last 60 days had a general meeting to discuss things we do wrong that we can fix in the next fourteen days? UniCredit Group/ UniCredito Italiano* ** 3rd party measurement Customer-initiated

measurement Primary $$$$ incentives Factories Primary Corporate Initiative Etc *#13 **TP/#1 The director of staff services at the giant financial services firm, UniCredit Group, installed the most thorough internal customer

satisfaction measures scheme I have seenwith exceptional rewards for those who make the grade with their internal customers. 21. Have you had in the last year a one-day, intense offsite with each (?) of your internal customersfollowed by a big celebration of things gone right? 22. Have you in the last week pushed someone to do some family thing that you fear might be overwhelmed by deadline pressure? 23. Have you learned the names of the children of everyone who reports to you? (If not, you have six months to fix it.)

24. Have you taken in the last month an interesting-weird outsider to lunch? 25. Have you in the last month invited an interesting-weird outsider to sit in on an important meeting? 26. Have you in the last three days discussed something interesting, beyond your industry, that you ran across in a meeting, reading, etc? 27. Have you in the last 24 hours injected into a meeting I ran across this interesting idea in [strange place]? 28. Have you in the last two weeks asked someone to report on something, anything that constitutes an act of brilliant service rendered in a trivial situationrestaurant, car wash, etc? (And then discussed the relevance to your work.) 29. Have you in the last 30 days examined in detail (hour

by hour) your calendar to evaluate the degree time actually spent mirrors your espoused priorities? (And repeated this exercise with everyone on team.) 30. Have you in the last two months had a presentation to the group by a weird outsider? You = Your calendar* *Calendars never lie

All we have is our time. The way we spend our time is our priorities, is our strategy. Your calendar knows what you really care about. Do you? 31. Have you in the last two months had a presentation to the group by a customer, internal customer, vendor featuring working folks 3 or 4 levels down in the vendor organization? 32. Have you in the last two months had a presentation to the group of a cool,

beyond-our-industry ideas by two of your folks? 33. Have you at every meeting today (and forever more) re-directed the conversation to the practicalities of implementation concerning some issue before the group? 34. Have you at every meeting today (and forever more) had an end-of-meeting discussion on action items to be dealt with in the next 4, 48 hours? (And then made this list publicand followed up in 48 hours.) And made sure everyone has at least one such item.) 35. Have you had a discussion in the last six months about what it would take to get recognition in local-national poll of best places to work? 36. Have you in the last month approved a cool-different training course for one of your folks?

Have you in the last month taught a front-line training course? 37. 38. Have you in the last week discussed the idea of Excellence? (What it means, how to get there.) 39. Have you in the last week discussed the idea of Wow? (What it means, how to inject it into an ongoing routine project.) 40. Have you in the last 45 days assessed some major process in terms of the details of the experience, as well as results, it provides to its external or internal customers?

41. Have you in the last month had one of your folks attend a meeting you were supposed to go to which gives them unusual exposure to senior folks? 42. Have you in the last 60 (30?) days sat with a trusted friend or coach to discuss your management styleand its long- and short-term impact on the group? 43. Have you in the last three days considered a professional relationship that was a little rocky and made a call to the person involved to discuss issues and smooth the waters? (Taking the blame, fully deserved or not, for letting the thing-issue fester.) 44. Have you in the last two hours stopped by someones (two-levels down") officeworkspace for 5 minutes to ask What do you think? about an issue that arose at a more or less just completed meeting? (And then stuck around for 10 or so minutes to listenand visibly taken notes.)

45. Have you in the last day looked around you to assess whether the diversity pretty accurately maps the diversity of the market being served? (And ) 46. Have you in the last day at some meeting gone out of your way to make sure that a normally reticent person was engaged in a conversationand then thanked him or her, perhaps privately, for their contribution? 47. Have you during your tenure instituted very public (visible) presentations of performance? 48. Have you in the last four months had a session specifically aimed at checking on the corporate culture and the degree we are true to itwith all presentations by relatively junior folks, including front-line folks? (And with a determined effort to keep the conversation restricted to real world small casesnot theory.) 49. Have you in the last six months talked about the Internal Brand Promise? 50. Have you in the last year had a full-day off site to talk about individual (and group)

aspirations? Relationships (of all varieties) : THERE ONCE WAS A TIME WHEN A THREE-MINUTE PHONE CALL

WOULD HAVE AVOIDED SETTING OFF THE DOWNWARD SPIRAL THAT RESULTED IN A COMPLETE RUPTURE. R.O.I.R . Return On Investment In

Relationships Job One. You must care. General Melvin Zais

Courtesies of a small and trivial character are the ones which strike deepest in the grateful and appreciating heart. Henry Clay The magic number 25. Mbwa. Calendars never lie.

Excellence. Always. 25 Though his empire is enormous, and his executive team strong, Starbucks founder Howard Schultz still visits at least 25 Sbucks shops per week!

religiously Regardless of our size, he told me, we still sell it one-cup-at-a-time, one customer-at-a-time, one server-ata-time. I need to see it and touch it and feel it. MBWA* *5,000 miles for a 5-minute face-to -face meeting (courtesy superagent Mark McCormick) When Bob Waterman and I wrote In Search of

Excellence in 1982, business was by the numbersand the Americans were struggling (to put it mildly) with hands on, tactile stuff, like Japanese quality. Then, at Hewlett Packard, we were introduced to the famed HP Way, the centerpiece of which was in-touch management. HP had a term (Managing By Wandering Around.) Bob for this MBWA. and I fell in immediate love. Not only was the idea

per se important and cool, but it symbolized everything we were coming to cherishenterprises where bosses-leaders were in immediate touch with and emotionally attached to workers, customers, the product. The idea is as important or more important in fast-paced 2007 as it was in 1982. 20minute rule Craig Johnson/30 yrs

Craig Johnson, a famed Venture Capitalist for three decades refuses to invest in companies that are more than a 20-minute drive from his office. To guide them through the serpentine path ahead, he insists that he must be in constant touch as banker, advisor, friend.

>70 * China is clearly our most important economic partner. Our dialog with China was not what it might have been when Hank Paulson took over as Secretary of the Treasury. Immediate improvement occurred for numerous reasons, not least of which were Paulsons SEVENTY TRIPS to China while at Goldman Sachs.

I call 60 CEOs to wish them happy New Year. [in the first week of the year] Hank Paulson, former CEO, Goldman Sachs Source: Fortune, Secrets of Greatness, 0320.05

MBWA, Grameen Style! Conventional banks ask their clients to come to their office. Its a terrifying place for the poor and illiterate. The entire Grameen Bank system runs on the principle that people should not come to the bank, the bank should go to the people. If any staff member is seen in the office, it should be taken as a violation of the rules of the Grameen Bank. It is essential that [those

setting up a new village Branch] have no office and no place to stay. The reason is to make us as different as possible from government officials. Source: Muhammad Yunus, Banker to the Poor You must be the change you wish to see in the world.

Gandhi Its always showtime. David DAlessandro, Career Warfare a blinding flash of the obvious Manny Garcia

All this [this little riff] is indeed, as seminar participant and leading Burger King franchisee Many Garcia once said to me, obvious.* But observation over four decades** suggests that amidst the hubbub and travails of a typical days work, the socalled obvious is often-usually left unattended. For perfectly good reasons, another week passes without a visit to our equivalent of the Starbucks shops or HP R&D labs, without the equivalent to Hank Paulsens How ya doin? call to a key customer. My [Tom Peters] Job One in life? Remind busy folks of the obvious! *Manny Garcia/1983: Tom, I hope you wont be insulted when I say this was the best seminar Ive ever been toand it was a blinding flash of the obvious.

**I had two commanding officers during my two Vietnam tours in U.S. Naval Mobile Construction Battalion NINE (1966-1968). One was a Howard Shultz look-alikeinstinctively in the field. The other was an in the office leader. The one produced. The other didnt. At age 24 I learned an incredible life lesson, though I couldnt describe it well until tripping over HPs MBWA/Managing By Wandering Around. EXCELLENCE . 1982. Hard is soft.

Soft is hard. Hard Is Soft Soft Is Hard Hard Is Soft (#s) Soft Is Hard (people) Hard Is Soft (Plans, # s) Soft Is Hard (people, customers, values,

relationships)) The 7-S Model Strategy Structure Systems Style Skills Staff Super-ordinate goal The 7-S Model

Hard Ss (Strategy, Structure, Systems) Soft SS (Style, Skills, Staff, Super-ordinate goal) The 7-S Model Strategy Structure

Systems Style (Corporate Culture, The way we do things around here) Skills (Distinctive Competence/s) Staff (People-Talent) Super-ordinate goal (Vision, Core Values) If I could have chosen not to tackle the IBM culture head-on, I probably wouldnt have. My bias coming in was toward

strategy, analysis and measurement. In comparison, changing the attitude and behaviors of hundreds of thousands of [Yet] I came to see in my time at IBM that culture isnt just one aspect of the gameit is the game. people is very, very hard. Lou Gerstner, Who Says Elephants Cant Dance

EXCELLENCE . Always. Respect. It was much later that I realized Dads secret. He gained respect by giving it. He talked and listened to the fourth-grade kids in Spring Valley who shined shoes the same way he talked and listened to a bishop or a

He was seriously interested in who you were and what you had to say. college president. Sara Lawrence-Lightfoot, Respect The [Union senior] officers rode past the Confederates smugly without any sign of recognition except by one. When

General Grant reached the line of ragged, filthy, bloody, despairing prisoners strung out on each side of the bridge, he lifted his hat and held it over his head until he passed the last man of that living funeral cortege. He was the only officer in that whole train who recognized us as being on the face of the earth.* *quote within a quote from diary of a Confederate soldier Its not people who

arent credit-worthy. Its banks that arent people worthy. Muhammad Yunus The deepest human need is the need to be appreciated. William James Dont

belittle! OD Consultant Story I once heard: Famous consultant, with a whopping daily fee, comes into a room to address a Client group. He walks to the blackboard and writes upon it two words. Dont belittle. He turns and walks outand sends hi full bill.* *Makes sense to me

Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a great battle. Philo of Alexandria You can make more friends in two months by becoming interested in

other people than you can in two years by trying to get other people interested in you. Dale Carnegie He had done nothing to sell me on his business, yet he had given me the most Because his sole concern had been my welfare and

the success of my business. powerful sales pitch of my life. Jim Penman, on learning how to sell (What Will They Franchise Next? The Story of Jims Group ) If you dont listen, you dont sell anything.

Carolyn Marland/Managing Director/Guardian Group Attending to the Last 98%: The New Management Science, or Hard Is Soft, Soft Is Hard Tom Peters/09 April 2008 Alternate title

Attending to the Last 98%: flower power! Tom Peters/06 April 2008 FLOWER POWER Hold in your mind the idea of flower power more to come!

S = ( ___ ) Success Is a Function of SF50: Success Is a Function of* ... *What follows are not in fact true mathematical formulaeobviously. Nonetheless, in tribute to my own

SF50: 50 Equations on achieving success at pretty much anything S = (#&DR; -2L, -3L, 4L, I&E) Success is a function of: Number and depth of relationships 2, 3, and 4 levels down inside and outside the organization

S = (SD>SU) Sucking down is more important than sucking upthe idea is to have the [your] entire organization working for you. S = (#non-FF, #non-FL) Number of friends not in my function S = (#XFL/m) Number of lunches with colleagues in other functions per month

S = (#FF) Number of friends in the finance organization Loser: Hes such a suck-up! Winner:

Hes such a suck-down. Never* waste a lunch! *More or less S =(#PKWP) S = (#PKLP) # of people you know in the wrong places # people you know in low places

??????? Success doesnt depend on the number of people you know; it depends on the number of people you know in high places! or Success doesnt depend on the number of

people you know; it depends on the number of people you know in low places! It helps to know people in high places!

It helps more to know people in low places! Gust Avarkotos boiler room CIA pals

Walters enabler P.M. Thank You notes Flexirents XSecs Customer PA lunches Anybodys XSec Anybodys PA All customer Purchasing Dept receptionists Secy Chaffees letter writer McKinsey report prep staff McKinsey research staff Admirals Aide Congressional Committee staff drafter Congressmans appropriate LA Anybody in Finance

The previous entries are shorthand for stories about low level relationships determining high level decisionsor at least having surprising impact. Flexirent is an Australian consumer financial services company. Its offerings are mostly made through retailersand following the 80-20 rule, a small # of retailers control a large share of Flexirents business. The Executive Secretary-PA (Personal Assistant) to Flexirents CEO is a bright, energetic, outgoing person. Along the way, and not accidentally, she has developed very close relationships to the Pas of most of the CEOs of Flexirents major customers. Among other things, she more or less regularly (quarterly, roughly)

takes her PA pals out for lunch. The goal on both sides is clear, understood and shamelessto enhance unvarnished communications among these true power players. One can only imagine the number of times, over, say, five years, that this back channel (front Channel, in reality) has paved the way for success and staved off disasters. The rest of the entries on the slide are of the same ilk. S = (OF) Number of oddball friends

S = (PDL) Purposeful, deep listeningthis is very hard S = (DSTM, EH, TTAGFG) Dont shoot the messengerembrace him! Truth-tellers are gifts from God! S + (#EODD3MC) Number of end-of-the-day difficult (youd rather avoid) 3minutecalls that sooth raw feelings, mend fences, etc.

S = (UFP, UFK, OAPS) Unsolicited favors performed, UFs involving co-workers kids, overt acts politeness-solicitude toward co-workers spouses, parents, etc. Relationships (of all varieties) : THERE

ONCE WAS A TIME WHEN A THREE-MINUTE PHONE CALL WOULD HAVE AVOIDED SETTING OFF THE DOWNWARD SPIRAL THAT RESULTED IN A COMPLETE RUPTURE. S= (TSHRO)

Time spent ... Hurdle Removing for Others Peter Drucker once famously said, Ninety-percent of what we call management consists of making it difficult for people to get things done. There is more than a grain of truth to that. On the other side, and there can be an other side, I see the managers principal role as identifying things that get in peoples way (by asking them!) and meticulously getting those things out of their way. Thence, you could cal the boss the CIRO, or Chief Impedance Reduction Officer, or my choice, CHR, Chief

Hurdle Remover. In any event the idea is that this is a/the primary task the boss performsand that it is a systematic, pro-active affair (e.g., on the daily agenda). S = (A#C, PTS/OLC, SAPA) Absolute # of consultations, perception of being taken seriously (Responsible for one line of code), small acts of public appreciation S = (1D)

Seeking the assignment of writing first drafts, minutes, etc. (1787) S = (#SEAs) Number of solid relationships with Executive Assistants S = (%UL/w-m) % useful lunches per week, month S = (FG, FOC-BOF, CMO)

Favors given, favors owed collectively, balance of favors, conscious management thereof Buy inOwnershipAuthorial bragging rights-Born again One Line of Code! Champion = It works this way, Tom. Youre talking to a guy whos important to implementation down where the rubber

meets the road. Hes skepticalhe either really is, or its the act he chooses to play. You go over the thing with him and he has a thousand objections. You nod your head a lot, and take copious notes. Then you go back to your guys, and you find a few places where you can very specifically accommodate him. You make the changes, even if they are pretty ugly. Then you go back to him, and show him exactly what youve done. You have a born again supporter. You took him seriouslyand through the changes, hes now your co-inventor, your savior. Now hes doing the selling for you. Hey, the whole damn thing wouldnt have worked were it not for his

interjectionsthats the way he frames it to his folks. I tell you, it never fails. Source: Australian IS-IT chief, mid-sized company in financial services S = (SU) Showing up (Woody Allen, Delawares ridiculous influence on the Constitution of the USA) S = (KSU, R) Keep showing up; relentlessness (U.S. Grant!!)

S = (DW, TMSTTOG) Drill wells, try more stuff than the other guy (John Masters, Mike Bloomberg) Ninety percent of success is showing up. Woody Allen

This is so simple it sounds stupid, but it is amazing how few oil people really you only find oil if you drill wells. understand that You may think youre finding it when youre drawing

maps and studying logs, but you have to drill. Source: The Hunters, by John Masters, Canadian O & G wildcatter We made mistakes, of course. Most of them were omissions we didnt think of when we initially wrote the software. We fixed them by doing it over and over, again and again. We do the same today. While our competitors are still sucking their thumbs trying to make the design perfect, were already on prototype version

#5. By the time our rivals are ready with wires and screws, #10. It gets back to planning versus acting: We act from day one; others plan how to planfor months. Bloomberg by we are on version

Bloomberg S= (CM) Conscious calendar management (the calendar never lies) You = Your calendar* *Calendars

never lie! You must be the change you wish to see in the world. Gandhi S = (CPRM, TS)

Conscious-planned Relationship management, time spent thereon R.O.I.R . Far more important than ROI! Return On Investment In

Relationships FYI: Relationship power = Monopoly power The goal is clearan unfair share of attention from an internal staffer, a vendor, a customer. We unabashedly pursue through good-betterbest relationshiops de facto monopolythe

monopolization of other important folks love and affection, as it were. Sustainable competitive advantage = Relationship-based advantage (period.) FYI: Some Resources: Relationships

The Managers Book of Decencies: How Small Gestures Build Great CompaniesSteve Harrison RespectSara Lawrence-Lightfoot Hostmanship: The Art of Making People Feel Welcome Jan Gunnarsson & Olle Blohm (leader as host to hisher employees) The SPEED of Trust: The One Thing that Changes EverythingStephen M.R. Covey The Dream Manager Matthew Kelly The Customer Comes Second: Put Your People First and Watch Em Kick ButtHal Rosenbluth and Diane McFerrin Peters (no relationbe delighted if she was) Crucial ConversationsKerry Patterson, Joseph Grenny,

Ron McMillan, Al Switzler Crucial Confrontations Kerry Patterson, Joseph Grenny, Ron McMillan, Al Switzler Influence: Science and PracticeRobert Cialdini Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQDaniel Goleman A few of my favorite reads on this topic especially #1. The idea of competitiveadvantage-through-decency is extraordinary. Of course, we know thisbut to see it spelled out this way may change the course of your professional life.

S = (TN/d, FG/m, AA/d) Thank you notes per Day, flowers given per Month, Acts of Appreciation per Day S = (WLHAO) Willingness to laugh heartily at oneself S = (PTA100%ATS, ENMF, TTT)

Proactive, timely, 100% apologies for tiny screw-ups, even if not my fault (it always takes two to tango) S = (AMR, NBS-SG) Acceptance of mutual responsibilities for all affairs, no blameshifting, scape-goating S = (RP, PRP>>P) Never forget, and act accordingly: Response to the screwupproblem and perception thereof is (far, far) more important than the problem itself!

S = (APLSLFCT) Awareness, perception of little snubsand lightening fast correction thereof S = (TN/d, FG/m, AA/d) Thank you notes per Day, flowers given per Month, Acts of Appreciation per Day S = (WLHAO)

Willingness to laugh heartily at oneself S = (RP, PRP>>P) Never forget, and act accordingly: Response to the screwupproblem and perception thereof is (far, far) more important than the problem itself! S = (APLSLFCT) Awareness, perception of little snubsand lightening fast correction thereof THE PROBLEM IS RARELY/

NEVER THE PROBLEM. THE RESPONSE TO THE PROBLEM INVARIABLY ENDS UP BEING THE REAL PROBLEM. PROBLEM S = (Thank you notes per Day, flowers given per Month,

Acts of Appreciatio per Week) The deepest human need is the need to be appreciated. William James Courtesies of a small and trivial character are the ones which strike

deepest in the grateful and appreciating heart. Henry Clay S = (PTA100%ATS, ENMF, TTT) Proactive, timely, 100% apologies for tiny screw-ups, even if not my fault (it always takes two to tango) S = (AMR, NBS-SG) Acceptance of mutual responsibilities for all affairs, no blameshifting, scape-goating

Im really sorry. Power phrase: Amazing how rare this iswhich of course is why its so powerful. I screwed

up. Power phrase: S = (G) Grace S = (GA) Grace toward adversary S = (GW)

Grace toward the wounded in bureaucratic firefights S = (PD) Purposeful decency S = (MBTSSMR) Purposeful management of this Soft Stuff by people reporting to me S = (EC, MMO)

Emotional connection, mgt & maintenance of S = (IMDOP) Investment in Mastery of detailed organizational processes What I learned from my years as a hostage negotiator is that we do not have to feel powerlessand that

bonding is the antidote to the hostage situation. George Kohlrieser, Hostage at the Table (GKs negotiation success rate is >95%) S = (H-TS)

Time spent on Hiring S = (TSPD, TSP-L1) Time spent on promotion decisions, especially for 1st level managers S = (%SS, H-PD) % soft stuff involved in Hiring, Promotion decisions S = (%WLP)

% women in leadership positions S = (TWA, P, NP) Time wandering around, purposeful, non-planned S = (SBS) Slack built into Schedule AS

LEADERS, WOMEN RULE: New Studies find that female managers outshine their male counterparts in almost every measure Womens Negotiating Strengths *Ability to put themselves in their counterparties shoes

*Comprehensive, attentive and detailed communication style *Empathy that facilitates trust-building *Curious and attentive listening *Less competitive attitude *Strong sense of fairness and ability to persuade *Proactive risk manager *Collaborative decision-making Source: Horacio Falcao, Cover story/May 2006, World Business, Say It Like a Woman: Why the 21st-century negotiator will need the female touch

This relationship stuff comes naturally to women (for starters, from the genes); and is painfully difficult for many-most men. TAKE THIS QUICK QUIZ: QUIZ Who manages more things at once? Who puts more effort into their appearance? Who usually takes care of the details? Who finds it easier to meet new people? Who asks more questions in a conversation? Who is a better listener? Who

has more interest in communication skills? Who is more inclined to get involved? Who encourages harmony and agreement? Who has better intuition? Who works with a longer to do list? Who enjoys a recap to the days events? Who is better at keeping in touch with others? Source: Selling Is a Womans Game: 15 Powerful Reasons Why Women Can Outsell Men, Nicki Joy & Susan Kane-Benson S= (%TMTSS,

PMTSS, DTDTSS) Q: But wheres the beef? is A: This the beef! The terms hard facts,

and the soft stuff used in business imply that data are somehow real and strong while emotions are weak and less important. George Kohlrieser, Hostage at the Table O(B) = (XX) O(B), the blueness of ones ocean [think Blue Ocean Strategy, the popular book], is directly proportional to

eXcellence in eXecution/XX ones , per me. [If one finds a strategic blue ocean, one will, especially in todays world, copied immediately; the only defensepossibility of sustaining successis XX/eXcellence in eXecution. Think EXXON MOBIL; they and their rivals know where the hydrocarbons arebut EXXON MOBIL handily out-executes the competition.] Equations #48, #49 and #50 are more

about organizational effectiveness than individual effectivenessand thus round out this brief presentation. S(O) = (XXFX) The single most important cause of failure to execute effectively is the lack of effective cross-functional communication-execution. Hence, Organizational Success is a eXcellence (X) in crossfunctional (XF) eXecution (X). Attached function of

as Appendix II is my: The XF-50: 50 Ways to Enhance CrossFunctional Effectiveness and Deliver Speed, Service Excellence and Value-added Customer Solutions. S(O) = (XSIT) In 1982 in In Search of Excellence, Bob Waterman and I wrote about the idea of MBWA, or Managing By Wandering Around; we came across MBWA at HewlettPackard, then a much smaller company, and it was love at first sight! For reasons described in Appendix III, I recently returned to the centrality of that notionand created a list of 50 Have Yous. That is, instead of worrying ceaselessly about strategy and blue oceans, how good a job have you done at Staying In Touch with your extended internal

and external organizational family? That is: S(O), X SIT, eXcellence at Staying In Touch. Organizational Success, is a function of Hard Is Soft Soft Is Hard Hard Is Soft (Plans, # s) Soft Is Hard (people,

customers, values, relationships)) If I could have chosen not to tackle the IBM culture head-on, I probably wouldnt have. My bias coming in was toward strategy, analysis and measurement. In comparison, changing the attitude and behaviors of hundreds of thousands of people is very, very hard. [Yet] I came to see in my time at IBM that culture isnt just one aspect of the

it is the game. game Lou Gerstner, Who Says Elephants Cant Dance The tough-minded Mr Gerstner became a reluctant convert to the power of

this soft stuff. FLOWER POWER Organizations exist to serve. Period. Leaders live to serve. Period. Tom Peters/17 September 2007 Why in the

World did Enthusiasm. Emotion. Excellence. Energy. Excitement. Service. Growth. Creativity. Imagination. Vitality. Joy. Surprise. Independence. Spirit. Community. Limitless human potential. Diversity. Profit. Innovation. Design. Quality. Entrepreneurialism. The Peters Principles:

Wow! An emotional, vital, innovative, joyful, creative, entrepreneurial endeavor that elicits maximum Enterprise* ** (*at its best): concerted human potential in the wholehearted service of others.**

others **Employees, Customers, Suppliers, Communities, Owners, Temporary partners Excellence1982: The Bedrock Eight Basics 1. A Bias for Action 2. Close to the Customer 3. Autonomy and Entrepreneurship 4. Productivity Through People 5. Hands On, Value-Driven 6. Stick to the Knitting 7. Simple Form, Lean Staff

8. Simultaneous Loose-Tight Properties Breakthrough 82* People! Customers ! Action! Values! In search of excellence:

Lessons from America's best run companies/ 82 a passion for excellence: the leadership difference/ 84 thriving on chaos: a handbook for management revolution/ 87 liberation management:

necessary disorganization for the nanosecond nineties/ 92 the tom peters seminar: crazy times call for crazy organizations/ 93 The pursuit of wow!/ 94 the circle of innovation / 97 the work matters: the brand you 50/ 99 re-imagine: business excellence in a disruptive age/ 03 Organizations exist

to serve. Period. Leaders live to serve. Period. I have always believed that the purpose of the corporation is to be a blessing to the employees. Boyd Clarke

Organizations exist to serve. Period. Leaders live to serve. Period. Organizations exist to serve. Period. Leaders live to serve. Period. Passionate servant leaders, determined to create a legacy of earthshaking transformation in their domain (a 600SF retail space, a 4-person training department, an urban school, a rural school, a city, a nation),

create/ must necessarily create organizations which are no less than Cathedrals in which the full and awesome power of the Imagination and Spirit and native Entrepreneurial flair (We are all entrepreneursMuhammad Yunus) of diverse individuals (100% creative Talentfrom checkout to lab, from Apple to Wegmans to Janes one-person accountancy in Invercargill NZ) is unleashed in passionate pursuit of jointly perceived soaring purpose (= win a Nobel peace prize like Yunus, or at least do something worthy of bragging about

25 years from now to your grandkids) and personal and community and client service Excellence. no less than Cathedrals in which the full and awesome power of the Imagination and Spirit and native Entrepreneurial flair of diverse individuals is unleashed in passionate pursuit of Excellence.

Such Talent unbound pursue Quests (rapidly and relentlessly experimenting and failing and trying again) which surprise and surpass and redefine the expectations of the individual and the servant leader alike. The collective products of these Quests offer the best chance of achieving rapid organizational and individual adaptation to fasttransforming environments, and provide

the nutrition for continuing (and sometimes dramatic) re-imaginings which re-draw the boundaries of industries and communities and human achievement. In turn, such organizations, bent upon excellence and re-imaginings based on maximizing human creativity and achievement, will, more or less automatically, create cadres of imaginative and inspiring and determined servant leaders who stick around to take the organization to another levelor,

equally or more important, leave to spread the virus of Freedom-CreativityExcellence-Transforming Purpose by pathfinding new highways and alleyways which, through the potent process of creative destruction vitalize and revitalize Entrepreneurial Capitalism, which in turn is the best hope for maximizing collective human Freedom, Happiness, Prosperity, Wellbeing and, one prays, some measure of Peace on earth. such organizations, bent upon

excellence and re-imaginings based on maximizing human creativity and achievement vitalize and revitalize, through creative destruction, Entrepreneurial Capitalism, which in turn is the best hope for maximizing collective human Freedom, Happiness, Prosperity, Wellbeingand, one prays, some measure of Peace on earth.

Organizations exist to serve. Period. Leaders live to serve. Period. Leaders SERVE people. Period. Anon.

We are a Life Success Company. Dave Liniger, founder, RE/MAX Cause Space (worthy of commitment)

(room for/encouragement for initiative) Decency humane) (respect, Cause Space

(worthy of commitment) (room for/encouragement for initiative-adventures) Decency (respect, grace, integrity, humane)

service (worthy of our clients & extended familys continuing custom) excellence (period)

Cause Space (worthy of commitment) (room for/encouragement for initiative- adventures) Decency service

(respect, grace, integrity, humane) (worthy of our clients & extended familys continuing custom) excellence servant leadership (period)

Cause Space Decency service excellence servant leadership EXCELLENCE. BEDROCK. LEADERSHIP. 9Ps.

PURPOSE. PASSION. Potential. Presence. Personal. PERSISTENCE. PEOPLE. Potent. Positive. PURPOSE. PASSION.

Potential. Presence. Personal. PERSISTENCE. PEOPLE. Potent. Positive. People want to be part of something larger than themselves. They want to

be part of something theyre really proud of, that theyll fight for, sacrifice for , trust. Howard Schultz, Starbucks (IBD/09.05) PURPOSE. PASSION. Potential.

Presence. Personal. PERSISTENCE. PEOPLE. Potent. Positive. Nothing is so contagious as enthusiasm. Samuel Taylor Coleridge

PURPOSE. PASSION. Potential. Presence. Personal. PERSISTENCE. PEOPLE. Potent. Positive. In the end,

management doesnt change culture. Management invites the workforce itself to change the culture. Lou Gerstner The role of the Director is to create a space where the actors

become more than theyve ever been before, more than theyve dreamed of being. and actresses can Robert Altman, Oscar acceptance speech PURPOSE. PASSION.

Potential. Presence. Personal. PERSISTENCE. PEOPLE. Potent. Positive. 2 PURPOSE.

PASSION. Potential. Presence. Personal. PERSISTENCE. PEOPLE. Potent. Positive. You must

be the change you wish to see in the world. Gandhi PURPOSE. PASSION. Potential. Presence. Personal.

PERSISTENCE. PEOPLE. Potent. Positive. This [adolescent] incident [of getting from point A to point B] is notable not only because it underlines Grants fearless horsemanship and his determination, but also it is the first known example of a very important Grant had an extreme, almost phobic

dislike of turning back and retracing his steps. If he peculiarity of his character: set out for somewhere, he would get there somehow, whatever the difficulties that lay in his way. This idiosyncrasy would turn out to be one the factors that made him such a formidable general. Grant would always, always press onturning back was not an option for him. Michael Korda, Ulysses Grant Success seems to be largely a

matter of hanging on after others have let go. Feather, author William

PURPOSE. PASSION. Potential. Presence. Personal. PERSISTENCE. PEOPLE. Potent. Positive.

Leaders do people. Period. Anon. 2 per Year/ 20 per Decade = Excellence

+ Legacy PURPOSE. PASSION. Potential. Presence. Personal. PERSISTENCE. PEOPLE. Potent. Positive.

Kevin Roberts Credo 1. Ready. Fire! Aim. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

If it aint broke ... Break it! Hire crazies. Ask dumb questions. Pursue failure. Lead, follow ... or get out of the way! Spread confusion. Ditch your office. Read odd stuff. 10. Avoid moderation!

PURPOSE. PASSION. Potential. Presence. Personal. PERSISTENCE. PEOPLE. Potent. Positive.

The greatest danger for most of us is not that our aim is too high and we miss it, but that it is too low and we reach it. Michelangelo PURPOSE. PASSION.

Potential. Presence. Personal. PERSISTENCE. PEOPLE. Potent. Positive. The 1E Excellence can be obtained if you: ... care more than others think is wise;

... risk more than others think is safe; ... dream more than others think is practical; ... expect more than others think is possible. Source: Anon. (Posted @ tompeters.com by K.Sriram, November 27, 2006 1:17 AM) "Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in one pretty and well preserved piece, but

to skid across the line broadside, thoroughly used up, worn out, leaking oil, shouting GERONIMO! Bill McKenna, professional motorcycle racer (Cycle magazine 02.1982) Geron-imo! WOMEN. DOMINATE. ECONOMIC.

GROWTH. Forget China, India and the Internet: Economic Growth Is Driven by Women. Headline,

Economist, April 15, 2006, Leader, page 14 Since 1970, women have held two out of every three new jobs created. FT, 10.03.2006 Forget China, India and the

Internet: Economic Growth Is Driven by Women. [Headline.] Even today in the modern, developed world, surveys show that parents still prefer to have a boy rather than a girl. One longstanding reason boys have been seen as a greater blessing has been that they are expected to become better economic providers for their parents old age. Yet it is time for parents to think again. Girls may now be a better investment. Girls get better grades in school than boys, and in most developed countries more women than men go to university. Women will thus be better equipped for the new jobs of the 21st century, in which brains count a lot

more than brawn. And women are more likely to provide sound advice on investing their parents neste.g.: surveys show that women consistently achieve higher financial returns than men do. Furthermore, the increase in female employment in the rich world has been the main driving force of growth in the last couple of decades. Those women have contributed more to global GDP growth than have either new technology or the new giants, India and China. Source: Economist, Economist April 15, Leader, page 14 A Guide to Womenomics:

The Future of the World Economy Lies Increasingly in Female Hands. (Headline.) More Continuing on page 73: stats: Around the globe since 1980, women have filled two new jobs for everyone taken by a man. Women are becoming more important in the global marketplace not just as workers, but also as consumers, entrepreneurs, managers and investors. Re consumption, Goldman Sachs in Tokyo has developed an index of 115 companies poised to benefit from womens increased purchasing power; over the past decade the value of shares in Goldmans basket has risen by 96%,

against the Tokyo stockmarkets rise of 13%. A couple of final assertions: (1) It is now agreed that the single best investment that can be made in the developing world is educating girls. (2) Also, surprisingly, nations with the highest female laborforce participation rates, such as Sweden and the U.S., have the highest fertility rates; and those with the lowest participation rates, such as Italy and Germany, have the lowest fertility rates. Source: Economist, April 15, page 73 Goldman Sachs in Tokyo

has developed an index of 115 companies poised to benefit from womens increased purchasing power; over the past decade the value of shares in Goldmans basket has risen by 96%, against the Tokyo stockmarkets rise of 13%. Economist, April 15 Repeat: 10 UNASSAILABLE REASONS WOMEN RULE

Women make [all] the financial decisions. Women control [all] the wealth. Women [substantially] outlive men. Women start most of the new businesses. Womens work force participation rates have soared worldwide. Women are closing in on same pay for same job. Women are penetrating senior ranks rapidly [even if the pace is slow for the corner office per se]. Womens leadership strengths are exceptionally well

aligned with new organizational effectiveness & value-added imperatives. Women are better salespersons than men. Women buy [almost] everythingcommercial as well as consumer goods. So what exactly is the point of men? One thing is certain: Womens rise to power, which is linked to the increase in wealth per capita, is happening in all domains and at all levels of society. Women are no longer content

to provide efficient labor or to be consumers with rising budgets and more autonomy to spend. This is just the beginning. The phenomenon will only grow as girls prove to be more successful than boys in the school For a number of observers, we have already entered the age of womenomics, the economy as thought out and practiced by a woman. Aude Zieseniss de Thuin, Financial Times, 10.03.2006 system.

Womenomics, the economy as thought out and practiced by a woman. Aude Zieseniss de Thuin, Financial Times, 10.03.2006 94%

of loans to women* *Microlending; Banker to the poor; Grameen Bank; Muhammad Yunus; 2006 Nobel Peace Prize winner Big bank CEO, summarizing to his top-management team his Toms made a great point; he let us know that our customer base

will be different and more diverse in the future. notes from TPs presentation: With all due respect, thats not what Tom said. Though I am an unabashed supporter of diversity in general, what I said Tom: was She

is your customerand has been for a long time and will be forever. And she is notably AWOL in this [meeting] room full of leaders. Women are the

majority market COROLLARY. EXCELLENCE. WOMEN. RULE. AS LEADERS, WOMEN RULE:

New Studies find that female managers outshine their male counterparts in almost every measure Womens Strengths Match New Economy Imperatives: Link [rather than rank] workers; favor interactive-collaborative leadership style [empowerment beats top-down decision making]; sustain fruitful collaborations; comfortable with sharing information; see redistribution of power

as victory, not surrender; favor multi-dimensional feedback; value technical & interpersonal skills, individual & group contributions equally; readily accept ambiguity; honor intuition as well as pure rationality; inherently flexible; appreciate cultural diversity. Judy B. Rosener, Americas Competitive Secret: Women Managers The XF-50: 50 Ways to Enhance CrossFunctional Effectiveness and Deliver Speed,

Service Excellence and Value-added Customer Solutions X =XFX* A 2007 letter from John Hennessy, president of (1) Stanford University, to alumni laid out his long-term vision for that esteemed institution. The core of the visions promise was more multi-disciplinary research, aimed at solving some of the worlds complex systemic problems. (2) The chief of

GlaxoSmithKline, a few years ago, announced a revolutionary new drug discovery processhuman-scale centers of interdisciplinary excellence, called Centers of Excellence in Drug Discovery. (It worked.) (3) Likewise, amidst a study of organization effectiveness in the oil industrys exploration sector, I came across a particularly successful firmone key to that success was their physical and organizational mingling of formerly warring (two sets of prima donnas) geologists and geophysicists. (4) The cover story in Dartmouth Medicine, the Dartmouth med school magazine, featured a

revolutionary approach, microsystems, as the big idea that [might] save U.S. healthcare. The nub is providing successful patient outcomes in hospitals by forming multi-function patient-care teams, including docs, nurses, labtechs and others. (Co-operating doc may top the oxymoron scale.) (5) One of the central responses to 911 is an effort to get intelligence services, home to some of the worlds most viscous turf wars, talking to one anotherwe may have seen some of the fruits of that effort in the recently released National Intelligence Estimate. And in the military, inter-service co-operation has increased by an order of

magnitude since Gulf War Onesome of the services communication systems can actually be linked to those of other services, a miracle almost the equal of the Christmas miracle in my book! 1. Its our organization to make workor not. Its not them, the outside world thats the problem. The enemy is us. Period. 2. Friction-free! Dump 90% of middle managersmost are advertent or inadvertent power freaks. We are allevery one of usin the Friction Removal Business, one moment at a time, now and forevermore.

3. No stovepipes! Stove-piping, Silo-ing is an Automatic Firing Offense. Period. No appeals. (Within the limits of civility, somewhat public firings are not out of the questionthat is, make one and all aware why the axe fell.) 4. Everything on the Web. This helps. A lot. (Everything = Big word.) 5. Open access. All available to all. Transparency, beyond a level thats sensible, is a de facto imperative in a Burn-the-Silos strategy. Project managers rule!! Project managers running XF (crossfunctional) projects are the Elite of the organization, and seen as such and treated as such. (The likes of construction companies have practiced this more or less forever.) 6.

7. Value-added Proposition = Application of integrated resources. (From the entire supplychain.) To deliver on our emergent business raison detre, and compete with the likes of our Chinese and Indian brethren, we must co-operate with anybody and everybody 24/7. IBM, UPS and many, many others are selling far more than a product or service that worksthe new it is pure and simple a product of XF co-operation; the product is the co-operation is not much of a stretch. We have met the enemy and he is us. Walt Kelly/Pogo Schlumberger!

A January 2008 BusinessWeek cover story informed us that Schlumberger may well take over the world: THE GIANT STALKING BIG OIL: How Schlumberger Is Rewriting the Rules of the Energy Game. In short, Schlumberger knows how to create and run oilfields, anywhere, from drilling to fullscale production to distribution. And the nugget is hardcore, relatively small, technically accomplished, highly autonomous teams. As China and Russia, among others, make their move in energy, state run companies are eclipsing the major independents. (Chinas state oil company just surpassed Exxon in market value.) At the center of it all, abetting these new players who are

edging out the Exxons and BPs, the Kings of Large-scale, Long-term Project Management wear Schlumberger overalls. (The pictures in the article from Siberia alone are worth the cover price.) At the center of the center of the Schlumberger empire is a relatively newly configured outfit, reminiscent of IBMs Global Services and UPS integrated logistics experts and even Best Buys now ubiquitous Geek Squads. The Schlumberger version is simply called IPM, for Integrated Project Management. It lives in a nondescript building near Gatwick Airport, and its chief says it will do just about anything an oilfield owner would want, from drilling to productionthat is, as BusinessWeek put it, [IPM] strays from [Schlumbergers] traditional role as a service provider* and moves deeper into areas once dominated by the majors. (*My old pal was solo on remote offshore platforms interpreting geophysical logs and the like.)

8. XF work is the direct work of leaders! 9. Integrated solutions = Our Culture. (Therefore: XF = Our culture.) 10. Partner with best-in-class only. Their pursuit of Excellence helps us get beyond petty bickering. An all-star team has little time for anything other than delivering on the (big) Client promise. 11. All functions are created equal! All functions contribute equally! All = All. 12. All functions are PSFs, Professional Service Firms. Professionalism is the watchwordand true Professionalism rise above turf wars. You are your projects, your legacy is your projectsand the legacy will be skimpy indeed unless you pass, with flying colors, the works well with others exam! 13. We are all in sales! We all (a-l-l) sell those Integrated Client Solutions. Good

salespeople dont blame others for screw-upsthe Clint doesnt care. Good salespeople are quarterbacks who make the system work-deliver. 14. We all invest in wiring the Client organizationwe develop comprehensive relationships in every part (function, level) of the Clients organization. We pay special attention to the so-called lower levels, short on glamour, long on the ability to make things happen at the coalface. 15. We all live the Brandwhich is Delivery of Matchless Integrated Solutions which transform the Clients organization. To live the brand is to become a raving fan of XF co-operation.

C(I)>C(E) * *Internal customer relations [C(I)] are perhaps-often more important than external relationships [C(E)]. That is, if you Internal Relationships are excellent, youll have your whole company working for you to get your jobs to the head of the queue. 16. We use the word partner until we want to barf! (Words matter! A lot!) 17. We use the word team until we want to barf. (Words matter! A lot!) 18. We use the word us until we want to barf. (Words matter! A lot!) 19. We obsessively seek Inclusionand abhor exclusion. We want more people from more places (internal, externalthe whole supply chain)

aboard in order to maximize systemic benefits. 20. Buttons & Badges matterwe work relentlessly at team (XF team) identity and solidarity. (Corny? Get over it.) 21. All (almost all) rewards are team rewards. 22. We keep base pay rather lowand give whopping bonuses for excellent team delivery of seriously cool cross-functional Client benefits. WE NEVER BLAME OTHER PARTS OF THE ORGANIZATION FOR SCREWUPS. 24. WE TAKE THE HEATTHE WHOLE TEAM. (For anything and everything.) (Losing, like winning, is a team affair.)

25. BLAMING IS AN AUTOMATIC FIRING OFFENSE. 23. 26. Women rule. Women are simply better at the XF communications stuffless power obsessed, less hierarchically inclined, more group-team oriented. Womens Negotiating Strengths *Ability to put themselves in their counterparties shoes *Comprehensive, attentive and detailed communication style

*Empathy that facilitates trust-building *Curious and attentive listening *Less competitive attitude *Strong sense of fairness and ability to persuade *Proactive risk manager *Collaborative decision-making Source: Horacio Falcao, Cover story/May 2006, World Business, Say It Like a Woman: Why the 21st-century negotiator will need the female touch Womens Strengths Match New

Economy Imperatives: Link [rather than rank] workers; favor interactive-collaborative leadership style [empowerment beats top-down decision making]; sustain fruitful collaborations; comfortable with sharing information; see redistribution of power as victory, not surrender; favor multi-dimensional feedback; value technical & interpersonal skills, individual & group contributions equally; readily accept ambiguity; honor intuition as well as pure rationality; inherently flexible; appreciate cultural diversity. Judy B. Rosener, Americas Competitive Secret: Women Managers

TAKE THIS QUICK QUIZ: QUIZ Who manages more things at once? Who puts more effort into their appearance? Who usually takes care of the details? Who finds it easier to meet new people? Who asks more questions in a conversation? Who is a better listener? Who has more interest in communication skills? Who is more inclined to get involved? Who encourages harmony and agreement? Who has better intuition? Who works with a longer

to do list? Who enjoys a recap to the days events? Who is better at keeping in touch with others? Source: Selling Is a Womans Game: 15 Powerful Reasons Why Women Can Outsell Men, Nicki Joy & Susan Kane-Benson 27. Every member of our team is an honored contributor. XF project Excellence is an all hands affair. 28. We are our XF Teams! XF project teams are how we get things done. 29. Wow Projects rule, large or smallWow projects demand by definition XF Excellence. 30. We routinely attempt to unearth and then reward small gestures of XF cooperation.

31. We invite Functional Bigwigs to our XF project team reviews. 32. We insist on Client team participationfrom all functions of the Client organization. 33. An Open talent market helps make the projects silo-free. People want in on the project because of the opportunity to do something memorableno one will tolerate delays based on traditional functional squabbling. 34. Flat! Flat = Flattened Silos. Flat = Excellence based on XF project outcomes, not power-hoarding within functional boundaries. 35. New C-level? We more or less need a C-level job titled Chief Bullshit Removal Officer. That is, some kind of formal watchdog whose role in life is to make cross-functionality work, and I.D. those who dont get with the program.

36. Huge (H-U-G-E) co-operation bonuses. Senior team members who conspicuously shine in the working together bit are rewarded or punished Big Time. (A million bucks in one case I knowand a noncooperating very senior was sacked.) James Robinson III: $500K (on the spot, collaboration)

Alan Puckett: Fire the best! (failure to collaborate) 37. Get physical!! Co-location is the most powerful culture changer. Physical X-functional proximity is almost a guarantee (yup!) of remarkably improved cooperationto aid this one needs flexible workspaces that can be mobilized for a team in a flash. 38. Ad hoc. To improve the new X-functional Culture, little XF teams should be formed on the spot to deal with an urgent issuethey may live for but ten days, but it helps the XF habit, making it normal to be working the XF way.

39. Deep dip. Dive three levels down in the organization to fill a senior role with some one who has been pro-active on the XF dimension. 40. Formal evaluations. Everyone, starting with the receptionist, should have an important XF rating component in their evaluation. 41. Demand XF experience for, especially, senior jobs. The military requires all would-be generals and admirals to have served a full tour in a job whose only goals were cross-functional. Great idea! 42. Early project management experience. Within days, literally, of coming aboard folks should be running some bit of a project, working with folks from other functionshence, all this becomes as natural as breathing.

43. Get em out with the customer. Rarely does the accountant or bench scientist call one the customer. Reverse that. Give everyone more or less regular customer-facing experiences. One learns quickly that the customer is not interested in our in-house turf battles! 44. Put it on theevery agenda. XF issues to be resolved should be on every agendamorning project team review, weekly exec team meeting, etc. A next step within 24 hours (4?) ought to be part of the resolution. 45. XF honest broker or ombudsman. The ombudsman examines XF friction events and acts as Conflict Resolution Counselor. (Perhaps a formal conflict resolution agreement?) 46. Lock it in! XF co-operation, central to any value-added mission, should be an

explicit part of the Vision Statement. 47. Promotions. Every promotion, no exceptions, should put XF Excellence in the top 5 (3?) evaluation criteria. 48. Pick partners based on their co-operation proclivity. Everyone must be on board if this thing is going to work; hence every vendor, among others, should be formally evaluated on their commitment to XF transparencye.g., can we access anyone at any level in any function of their organization without bureaucratic barriers? 49. Fire vendors who dont get itmore than get it, welcome it with open arms. 50. Jaw. Jaw. Jaw. Talk XF cooperation-value-added at every opportunity. Become a relentless bore!

Excellence! There is a state of XF Excellence per se. Talk about it. Pursue it. Aspire to nothing less. 51. X =XFX* C-levels to Abet Cross-functional Excellence CGRO/Chief Grunge Removal Officer

CXFCO/Chief Cross-functional Communication Officer CIS-CDO/Chief Information Sharing & Common Database Officer CHRO(PL) /Chief Human resources Officer (Project Managers, Love and Care of) CPMFO/Chief Project Management Finance Officer CTAO/Chief Team-space Assignments Officer CE(XFNC) /Chief Executioner (Cross-functional Non-cooperation!)

CXFBPO/Chief Cross-functional Brownie-points Officer In We have C-level officers for any damn thing you can mention. So I thought Id add my voice to the fray. If XF (Cross-functional) performance is a/the paramount issue for modern enterprise effectiveness (where one is bringing to bear the wherewithal of the entire enterprise to provide high-value, systemic solutions for customers), then XFX/Cross-functional excellence is

necessarily priority #1. And we need an exec to lead the chargetry these job titles on for size! The XF Bible Building a Knowledge-driven Organization: Overcome Resistance to the Free Flow of Ideas. Turn Knowledge into New Products and Services. Move to a Knowledge-based

Strategy Robert Buckman The 180-degree Middle Manager Flip @ Buckman Labs From: information choke points To: knowledge transfer

facilitators, with 100% (!!!) of their rewards based on spurring co-operation across former barriers. Bob Buckman runs Buckman Labs, a half-billion dollar, Memphis-based specialty chemicals company. You might well roll your eyes at the overused customer solutions monikerbut Buckman does just that with panache and for profit, creating and applying chemical compounds in customized ways to deal with production and cleanup issues for specific customer facilities in the likes of the paper and leather-making industries. The devotion to custom solutions is the bedrock, the alpha to omega, of the firms extraordinary new-product and financial

record. Those closer to the intellectual fray than me claim that Bob gets inventor rights in the now ubiquitous knowledge management arena. In any event, this book is the Buckman Labs saga in extraordinary detailit is particularly valuable because it moves so far beyond the relatively easy software-technology bit and emphasizes the way in which a companys culture must be jerked around 180-degrees to destroy former functional barriers. E.g., middle managers, typically choke points guarding information and access to their domain, became knowledge transfer facilitators, with

100% (!!!) of their rewards based on spurring cooperation across former barriers. The [Only?] Antidote to Functional Myopia: Projects and Projectbased PSFs [Professional Service Firms] I looked long and hard for an effective, high-battingaverage answer to the crippling costs of functional myopia. Crippling in terms of out of pocket $$$$. But more important, crippling in the sense of constraining the value and breadth of strategic services we can provide to our clients. The answer, I contend, and

furthermore the only answer, has long been under our noses. Namely, the Professional Service Firm. Its configuration is 100% projectsand projects, by definition, are multi-disciplinary efforts to solve a problem and implement its solution. To be sure, there are good, bad and indifferent PSFs, just as in any other arena. But the PSF at its best is an answer to many of our questions about adding value for clients in a very messy world. Tails Wagging Dogs!

IBM/IBM Global Services UPS/UPS Logistics Schlumberger/Integrated Project Management MasterCard/MasterCard Advisors Best Buy/Geek Squad The roster of companies turning to the PSF Solution is impressive, stunning, actually. The bellwether companies, and their implemented solutions arms enumerated on the prior slide, have bet the future on the

PSF Solution. And the M Stands for ? Systems Integrator of choice./BW Gerstners IBM: (Lou, help us turn all this into that long-promised revolution. ) IBM Global Services*

Services Corp.): (*Was: Integrated Systems $55B what can brown do for you? Big Browns New Bag: UPS

Traffic Manager for Corporate America Aims to Be the Headline/BW UPS wants to take over the sweet spot in the endless loop of

goods, information and capital that all the packages [it moves] represent. Source: ecompany.com (E.g., UPS Logistics manages the logistics of 4.5M Ford vehicles, from 21 mfg. sites to 6,000 NA dealers) I. LAN Installation Co. II. Geek Squad. III. Acquired by BestBuy. IV. Flagship of BestBuy

Wholesale Solutions Strategy Makeover. A local Minnesota firm, the Local Area Network Installation Co., decided to spice up its dreary business by becoming the Geek Squad. It was so successful that Minneapolis-based Best Buy purchased the company, aiming to notch up its service offerings. The experiment worked so well that Geek Squad client services became the core of the Best Buy strategy. The Value-added Ladder/ STUFF N THINGS

Goods Raw Materials The Value-added Ladder/Stuff & TRANSACTIONS Services Goods Raw Materials The Value-added Ladder/ OPPORTUNITY-SEEKING

Customer Success/ Gamechanging Solutions Services Goods Raw Materials Era #1/Obvious Value: Our it works, is delivered on time (Close) Era #2/Augmented Value: How our it

can add valuea useful it (Solve) Era #3/Complex Value Networks: How our system can change you and deliver business advantage (CultureStrategic change) Source: Jeff Thull, The Prime Solution: Close the Value Gap, Increase Margins, and Win the Complex Sale The project-based PSF Solution is becoming the mainstay of the emergent, soft services economy and its effectiveness wholly depends on erasing those formerly impenetrable functional barriers.

Department Head to Managing Partner, IS Inc. [HR, R&D, etc.] The basic idea begins by transforming myopic departments into de facto or de jure

multi-function Professional Service Firms.. The PSF35: Thirty-Five Professional Service Firm Marks of Excellence Presented here, in shorthand, are some PSF basicsa long, long way from department world.

The PSF35: The Work & The Legacy 1. CRYSTAL CLEAR POINT OF VIEW (E very Practice Group: If you cant explain your position in eight words or less, you dont have a positionSeth Godin) 2. DRAMATIC DIFFERENCE (We are the only ones who do what we doJerry Garcia) 3. Stretch Is Routine (Never bite off less than you can chewanon.) 4. Eye-Appetite for Game-changer Projects (Excellence at Assembling

Best TeamFast) 5. Playful Clients (Adventurous folks who unfailingly Aim to Change the World) 6. Small Uneconomic Clients with Big Aims 7. Life Is Too Short to Work with Jerks (Fire lousy clients) 8. OBSESSED WITH LEGACY (Practice Group and Individual: Dent the UniverseSteve Jobs) 9. Fire-on-the-spot Anyone Who Says, Law/Architecture/Consulting/ I-banking/ Accounting/PR/Etc. has become a commodity 10. Consistent with #9 above DO NOT SHY AWAY FROM THE WORD (IDEA) RADICAL

R.POV8* R.POV8 *Remarkable Point Of View/8 Words or less/If you cant state your position in eight words or less you dont have a position.SG The PSF35: The Client Experience 11. Always team with client: full partners in achieving memorable results (Wanted: Chimeras of Moonstruck Minds!) 12. We will seek assistance Anywhere to assemble the Best-inPlanet Team for the Project 13. Client Team Members routinely declare that working with us

was the Peak Experience of my Career 14. The jobs not done until implementation is 100.00% complete (Those who dont get it must go) 15. IMPLEMENTATION IS NOT COMPLETE UNTIL THE CLIENT HAS EXPERIENCED CULTURE CHANGE 16. IMPLEMENTATION IS NOT COMPLETE UNTIL SIGNIFICANT TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER HAS TAKEN PLACE-ROOT (Teach a man to fish )

17. The Final Exam: DID WE MAKE A DRAMATIC, LASTING, GAME-CHANGING DIFFERENCE? The business of selling is not just about matching viable solutions to the customers that require them. Its equally about managing the change process the customer will need to go through to implement the solution and achieve the value promised by

the solution.* solution (*E.g.: CRM failure rate/Gartner: 70%) Jeff Thull, The Prime Solution: Close the Value Gap, Increase Margins, and Win the Complex Sale The PSF35: The People & The Leadership 18. TALENT FANATICS (Best-Coolest place to work) (PERIOD) 19. EYE FOR THE PECULIAR (Hiring: Go beyond same old, same old) 20. Early Opportunities (vs. Wait your turn) 21. Up or Out (Based on Legacy/Mentoring as much as

Billings/Rainmaking) 22. Slide the Old Aside/Make Room for Youth (Find oldsters new roles?) 23. TALENT IS OBSESSED WITH RENEWAL FROM DAY #1 TO DAY #R [R = Retirement] 24. Office/Practice Leaders Evaluated Primarily on Mentoring-Team Building Skills 25. A PROPRIETARY TALENT DEVELOPMENT PROCESS (GE) 26. Team Leadership Skills Valued Early 27. Partner with B.I.W. [Best In World] Outsiders as Needed and to Infuse Different Views

The PSF35: The Firm & The Brand 28. EAT-SLEEP-BREATHE-OOZE is my messageGandhi) INTEGRITY (My life 29. Excellence+ in EXECUTION 100.00% of the Time 30. Drop everything/Swarm to Support a Harried-On The Verge Team 31. SPEND ON R&D LIKE A TECH FIRM.

32. A PROPRIETARY METHODOLOGY (FBR, McKinsey, Chiat Day, IDEO, old EDS) 33. BRAND MANIACS (Organize Around a Point of View Worth BROADCASTING) 34. PASSION! 35. ENTHUSIASM!

EXCELLENCE. ALWAYS. PSF/Professional Service Firm/Beliefs Profession: Calling/Passion to make a difference/Excellence (always) point of view: know exactly what we stand for/ Dramatic Difference Client: enduring, test-the-limits

relationship/Trusted advisor Solution: Rock His-her World/ wow/ implemented Culture change/ >>>>>> satisfaction Series/Reinventing Work The Project 50: Fifty Ways To Transform Every Task Into A Project That Matters The Professional Service Firm 50: Fifty Ways To Transform Your Department

Into A Professional Service Firm Whose Trademarks Are Passion And Innovation The Brand You 50: Fifty Ways To Transform Yourself From An Employee Into A Brand That Shouts Distinction, Commitment And Passion I wrote about all this in a series of 1999 books, collectively called Reinventing Work. Psf. Bedrock.

Cases. Cost (at All Costs*) Minimization Professional? Or/to: Full PartnerPurchasing Officer Thrust #1: Leader in Lifetime Value-added Maximization? Maximization (*Lopez: Arguably Villain #1 in GM tragedy/Anon VSE-Spain)

The terms on the slide may (do!) sound jargony, but the ideastotal transformation of attitudes and roleare in truth revolutionary. Fleet Manager Rolling Stock Cost Minimization Officer vs/or Chief of Fleet Lifetime

Value Maximization Strategic Supply-chain Executive Customer Experience Director (via drivers) Technology Executive (workin in a hospital) HCare CIO: Full-scale, Accountable (life or death)

Member-Partner of XYZ Hospitals Senior Healing-Services Team (who happens to be a techie) Or/to: PSF Transformation: Credit Department/Trek Was Is Credit Dept

Financial Services Hammer on dealers until they pay Make dealers successful so they CAN pay AR sold to 3rd party commercial co.

Trek is the commercial financial Company 23 employees 12 employees Oversee peak AR of $70M Oversee peak AR of $160M Identify risky dealers

Identify opportunities Cost Center Profit Center No products Products: Consulting, MC/Visa, Stored value of gift cards, Gift card peripherals, Online payments

Source: John Burke/0330.06 Getting Things Done The Power & Implementation34. In 1977 I submitted what my faculty advisor at Stanford called the first business school doctoral thesis, anywhere, on the topic of implementation per se. If true, its an

outrageand Id guess its at least close to true. Our B-schools teach strategy and marketing and financeanything one can quantify, in other words. The soft stuff, the people stuff, the getting it done part are absolutely-unequivocally A.W.O.L. Well, Im still doin in 2008 what I was doin in 1977causing as much fuss as I can about the issue of getting it done. In my current Master Presentation I have a little list, a couple of years old, on the subject of power and implementation. Youll find it

on the following slides .. *Send Thank You notes! Its (always) all about relationships. And at the Heart of Effective Relationships is APPRECIATION. (Oh yeah: Never, ever forget a birthday of a co-worker.) *Bring donuts! Small gestures of appreciation (on a rainy day, after a long days work the day before) are VBDs Very Big Deals. *Make the call! One short, hard-to-make call today can avert a relationship crisis that could bring you down six months from now. *Remember: There are no little gestures of kindness. As boss, stopping by

someones cube for 30 seconds to inquire about their sick parent will be remembered for 10 years. (Trust me.) *Make eye contact! No big deal? Wrong! It is all about Connection! Paying attention! Being there in the Moment Present. So, work on your eye contact, your Intent to Connect. *Smile! Or, rather: SMILE. Rule: Smiles beget smiles. Frowns beget frowns. Rule: WORK ON THIS. *Smile! (If it kills you.) Energy & enthusiasm & passion engender energyenthusiasm-passion in those we work with. Find something small that you can turn around. If

youre on a 9-game losing streak, you need to start with one great inning. Rudy G *Its all RELATIONSHIPS. Remember: Business is a relationships business. (Period.) Were all in sales! (Period.) Connecting! Making our case! Following up! Networking! Relationships are what we do. *You = Your Calendar. Your true priorities are given away by your calendar. YOUR CALENDAR NEVER LIES. What are you truly spending your time on? Are you distracted? Focused? *Whats in a number? EVERYTHING! While we all do a hundred things, we may

not/should not/cannot have more than 2 (or 3) true strategic priorities at any point in time. BELIEVE IT. *She (he) who is best prepared wins! Out study, out-read, out-research the competition. Know more (lots more!) than the person on the other side of the table. *Excellence is the Ultimate Cool Idea. The very idea of pursuing excellence is a turn onfor you and me as well as those we work with. (And, I find to my dismay, its surprisingly rare.) *Think WOW! language! Language matters! Hot words generate a Hot Team. Watch your

*Take a break! We need all the creativity we can muster these days. So close your office door and do 5 (FIVE) minutes of breathing or yoga; get a bag lunch today and eat it in the park. *Excellence is the Ultimate Cool Idea. The very idea of pursuing excellence is a turn on for you and me as well as those we work with. (And, I find to my dismay, its surprisingly

rare.) *You are the boss! Old ideas of lifetime employment at one company (maybe where Dad/Mom worked) are gone. No matter what your current status, think of your self as CEO of Brand Me, Inc. We are all Small Business Owners of our own careers. *Do something in the next half hour! Dont let yourself get stuck! There is ALWAYS something little you can start/do in the next thirty minutes to make a wee, concrete step forward with a problem-opportunity. *Test it! NOW! We call this the Quick Prototype Attitude. One of lifes, especially business lifes, biggest problems is: Too much talk, too little do. If youve got a Cool Idea, dont sit on it or research it to death. Grab a pal, an empty conference, and

start laying out a little model. That is, begin the process of transforming the Idea to Action ASAP. Incidentally, testing something quarter-baked in an approximation of the real world is the quickest way to learn. *Expand your horizons. Routinely reach out beyond your comfort zone. TAKE A FREAK TO LUNCH TOMORROW! Call somebody interesting youve been meaning to get in touch with; invite them to lunch tomorrow. (Lunch with the same ole gang means nothing new learned. And thats a guarantee.) (Remember: Discomfort = Growth.) *Build a Web site. The Web is ubiquitous. Play with it! Be a presence! Start You.com ASAP! The Small Win: A Big Idea

*Do something in the next half hour! Dont let yourself get stuck! There is ALWAYS something little you can start/do in the next thirty minutes to make a wee, concrete step forward with a problem-opportunity. *Spread the credit! Dont build monuments to yourself, build them to othersthose whose contributions we wholeheartedly acknowledge will literally follow us into machine gun fire!

*Follow Toms patented VFCJ strategy! VFCJ = Volunteer For Crappy Jobs. That is, volunteer for the crummy little assignment nobody else wants, but will give you a chance to (1) be on your own, (2) express your creativity, and (3) make a noticeable mark when it turns out Wow. *VOLUNTEER! Lifes a maze, and you never know whats connected to what. (Six degrees of separation, and all that.) So volunteer for that Community Center fund raising drive, even though youre busy as all get out. You might end up working side-by-side with the president of a big company whos looking for an enthusiast like you, or someone wealthy who might be interested in investing in the small business you dream of starting. *Join Toastmasters! You dont need to try and match Ronald Reagans

speaking skills, but you do need to be able to speak your piece with comfort, confidence and authority. Organizations like Toastmasters can help enormously. *Dress for success! This one is old as the hills and I hate it!! But its true. FIRST IMPRESSIONS DO MATTER. (A lot!!!) *Spread the credit! Dont build monuments to yourself, build them to othersthose whose contributions, no matter how small [Hint/Life Lesson: There is no such

thing as small], we wholeheartedly acknowledge will literally follow us into machine gun fire! *Follow the Gospel of Experience Marketing in all you do. The shrewdest marketers today tell us that selling a product or service is not enough in a crowded marketplace for everything. Every interaction must be reframed as a Seriously Cool Experience. That includes the little 15-minute presentation you are giving to your 4 peers tomorrow. *Think of your resume as an Annual Report on Brand Me Inc. Its not about keeping your resume updated. It is about having a Super-cool Annual

Report. (Tom Peters Inc 2004.) What are your stunning accomplishments that you can add to that Report each 6 months, or at the most annually? *Build a Great Team even if you are not boss. Best roster wins, right? So, work on your roster. Meet someone new at Church or your kids birthday party? Add them to your team (Team Tom); you never know when they might be able to assist you or give you ideas or support for something you are working on. *She or he who has the Fattest & and Best-managed Rolodex wins. Your Rolodex is your most cherished possession! Have you added 3 names to it in the last 2 weeks? Have you renewed acquaintance (email, lunch, gym date) with 3 people in your Rolodex in the last month? MANAGE YOUR ROLODEX!

*She or he who has the Fattest & and Best-managed Rolodex wins. Your Rolodex is your most cherished possession! Have you added 3 names to it in the last 2 weeks? Have you renewed acquaintance (email, lunch, gym date) with 3 people in your Rolodex in the last month? MANAGE YOUR

*Start your own business! Sure thats radical. But people are doing itespecially womenby the millions. Let the idea percolate. Chat about it, perhaps, with pals. Start a file folder or three on things you Truly Care About that just might be the basis for Cool Self-employment. *Theres nothing cooler than an Angry Customer! The most loyal customers are ones who had a problem with us and then marveled when we went the Extra Ten Miles to fix it! Business opportunity No. 1 = Irate customers converted into fans. So are you on the prowl for customer problems to fix? *All marketing is Relationship Marketing. In business, profit is a byproduct of bringing em back. Thus, systematic and intense

and repeated Follow-up and After-sales Service and Scintillating New Hooks are of the utmost importance. *Theres nothing cooler than an Angry Customer! The most loyal customers are ones who had a problem with us and then marveled when we went the Extra Ten Miles to fix it! Business opportunity No. 1 = Irate customers converted into fans. So are you on the

prowl for customer problems to fix? *BRANDING aint just for Big Dudes. This may well be Business Mistake No. 1 the idea that branding is only for the likes of Coke and Sony and Nike. Baloney! Branding applies as much for the one-person accountancy run out of a spare bedroom as it does for Procter & Gamble. *Credibility! In the end Character Matters Most. Does he/she give their word, and then stick to it come hell & high water? Can you rely on Her/Him in a

pinch? Does she/he CARE? *Grace. Is it a pleasure to do business with you? Is it a pleasure to be a member of your team? *Credibility! In the end Character Matters Most. Does he/she give their word, and then stick to it come hell & high water? Can you rely on Her/Him in a pinch? Does she/he CARE?

Three for the Ages GETTING TO YES Roger Fisher, William Ury, Bruce Patton LEARNED OPTIMISM Martin Seligman CRUCIAL CONFRONTATIONS Kerry

Patterson, Joseph Grenny, Ron McMillan, Al Switzler The Checklist: The Power of a Blinding Flash of the Obvious! Tom Peters/11 December 2007 Hospital (patient safety) problems are a bad joke killing us in America alone at a rate far in excess of 100,000 per year. In the home [U.S.] of the worlds sexiest acute-care equipment, often the fix is as

lowtech as it gets. E.g., concocting and then religiously using (pilot-like) the humble paper checklist. The idea came to Johns Hopkins doc Peter Pronovost. In short, it has revolutionary impact, as some of the figures in this brief presentation suggest. Humans being humans, and brittle professionals (docs) being brittle professionals, the widespread implementation has been far slower than it needs to be or ought to be. But my purpose here is to endorse the simple ideas a paper checklist in 2008that can change the world.

90K in ICU on any given day 178 steps/day 50% serious complication Source: Atul Gawande, The Checklist (New Yorker, 1210.07)

**Peter Pronovost, Johns Hopkins, 2001 **Checklist, line infections **1/3rd at least one error **Nurses/permission to stop procedure **1 year/10-day line-infection rate: 11% to 0% (43 infections, 8 deaths, $2M saved)

Source: Atul Gawande, The Checklist (New Yorker, 1210.07) **Docs, nurses make own checklists on whatever process-procedure they choose **Within weeks, average stay in ICU down 50% Source: Atul Gawande, The Checklist (New Yorker, 1210.07)

**Replicate in Inner City Detroit (resource strapped$$$, staff cut 1/3rd, poorest patients in USA) **Nurses QB **Project manager **Exec involvement (help with little thingsits all little things) **Blues, small bonuses for participating **6 months, 66% decrease in infection rate; USA:

bottom 25% to top 10% Source: Atul Gawande, The Checklist (New Yorker, 1210.07) [Pronovost] is focused on work that is not normally considered a significant contribution in academic medicine. As a result, few others are venturing to extend Yet his work has already saved more

lives than that of any laboratory scientist in the last decade. his achievements. Atul Gawande, The Checklist (New Yorker, 1210.07) Beware of the tyranny of making Small

Changes to Small Things. Big Changes to Big Rather, make Things. Roger Enrico, former Chairman, PepsiCo Beware of the tyranny of making

Things. Small Changes to Small Rather, make Big Changes Big Things using Small, Almost

Invisible Levers with Big Systemic Impact. to TP Charlie Wilsons War: Lessons Learned

Over Christmas [2007] I read George Criles Charlie Wilsons War, the tale of the astonishingly critical role of one determined, mildly deranged Congressman in engineering the defeat of the Soviets in Afghanistan, hence hastening immeasurably the subsequent implosion of the Evil Empire, our undisputed nemesis for the first half century of my life. I still am virtually unable to believe we escaped with our lives. I can state with some certainty that it was the most incredible non-fiction story I have ever (!!) read. Last night [January 2008] I saw the movieit was, for me, wonderful, though a pale reproduction of the full 550-page treatment by Crile. Turning to

the practicalities of your and my day to day professional affairs, the story was peppered with de facto analyses of how Charlie did his amazing thing. He is indeed larger than life, and yet his practical can do tactics have a lot to teach all of us. As I imagine it, 100% of the readers of this Blog are Professional Change Agents, fighting wars against the Bureaucratic Evil Empires which impede success. So what follows is rather (!) lengthy for a Blogpost, but ridiculously short considering the importance of the subject matter. Make friends! And then more friends! And then more friends!

1. The way things normally work, if youre not Jewish you dont get into the Jewish caucus, but Charlie did. And if youre not black you dont get into the black caucus. But Charlie plays poker with the black caucus; they had a game, and hes the only white guy in it. The House, like any human institution, is moved by friendships, and no matter what people might think about Wilsons antics, they tend to like him and enjoy his company. Likewise Wilsons CIA partner, Gust Avarkotos, made friends among the black members of the CIA, becoming the first white guy to win their informal Brown Bomber

Award (We want to give this award to the blackest m %^&*$f*$#@& of all.) Bottom line: Your power is directly proportional to the breadth and depth of your Rolodex. Quantity counts almost as much as quantityyou never know from whom you will need a little special service. She/he who has developed the best network of allies wins is essentially a truismthough not acknowledged by the majority of us and the overwhelmingly useless MBA programs which spawned many of us. Make friends by the bushel with those several levels down and with various disenfranchised groups. Gust 2.

Avarkotos strategy: He had become something of a legend with these people who manned the underbelly of the Agency [CIA]. E.g., Gust apparently knew every executive secretary by nameand had helped many of them out with personal or professional problems. You could almost say he had the invisible 95% of the Agency working for him which allowed him to make incredible things happen despite furious resistance from the top of a very rigid organization. I have spoken and Blogged on this topic before, arguing among other things that the key to sales success is wiring the client organization 3 or 4 levels down where the real work gets done. Most would agree perhapsbut damn few make it the obsession it needs to be to foster success. One added

(big) benefit is that those folks are seldom recognized, and thence the investment will likely yield long-lasting, not transient, rewards. 3. Carefully manage the BOF/Balance Of Favors. Practice potlatchgiving so much help to so many people on so many occasions (overkill!) that there is no issue about their supporting you when the time comes to call in the chits. Wilson made it easy for his colleagues to come to him, always gracious, almost always helpful. Some would argue, and I think Id agree, that conscious management of ones balance of favors (owed and due) is a very sensible thing to do in a pretty organized fashion. 4. Follow the money! Anybody with a brain can figure

out that if they can get on the Defense subcommittee, thats where they ought to bebecause thats where the money is. Getting near the heart of fiscal processes offers innumerable opportunities to effectively take control of a systemas long as you are willing to invest in the details that lead to Absolute Mastery of the topic. From the outside looking in, this is another big argument for nurturing relationships a few levels down in the organizationin this case the financial organization. 5. Network! Network! Network! Potential links of great value will neither be possible nor obvious until the network is very dense. The odds of useful connections

occurring is a pure Numbers Game. The more hyperlinks you have, the higher the odds of making the right connection. 6. Seek unlikely, even unwholesome allies, or at least dont rule them out. Find the right path (often $$ $$) and the most bitter of rivals will make common cause relative to some key link in the chain. 7. Found material. Dont re-invent the wheel. It costs too much, takes to much time, and requires too much bureaucratic hassle. Again and again Wilson took advantage of stuff, such as materials, that was

immediately available for userather than waiting an eternity for the perfect solution. 8. Found material II (People): Find disrespected oddball groups that have done exciting work but are not recognized. (E.g., in Wilsons case, a band of crazies in the Pentagons lightly regarded Weapons Upgrade Program.) 9. Real, Visible passion! Authenticity mattersespecially in highly bureaucratic environments. Passion also suggests annoying staying powerI might as well support him, hes not going away and hell hound me til hell freezes

over. Graphic evidence of the source of your passion. Charlie Wilson had one main hurdle to his plana 10. crusty old cynic. CW took him to the astounding Afghan refugee campsand made a fast and emotional friend of the cause in the space of an afternoon. If youve got a cause, you usually want to fix something that is a messfigure out a way to expose would be converts to startling, live demos of the problem, replete with testimony from those who are on the

losing end of things. Wilson subsequently did such things as creating a little program to treat horrid medical problems in the U.S.suddenly the demo was next door! (This works for a horrid bureaucratic process that is alienating us from our customers almost as much as in the Wilson case.) Hint: The demo must be graphic!) 11. Make it personal. On every visit to the refugee camps, Wilson donated blood on the spot. 12. Enthusiasm. Charlie and Gust oozed it from every pore re Afghanistan. 13. Showmanship. This (any implementation) is a

theatrical production, just like political campaignsevery project needs a showman obsessed with creating and moving forward the compelling story line. 14. Visible momentum! The smell of action must be in the air. Think of it as momentum managementan aspect of the showmanship theme. 15. Perception is always everything. Play head games with the bad guys. The goal was to create a Vietnam-like sense of hopelessness among the Soviets. The bark was worse than the bitebut demoralization, even in a totalitarian state, is eventually decisive. Wear the buggers out by inducing hopelessness (We dont need this.)

16. Goal is clear and unequivocal and inspiring Victory. Gust: It wasnt a defeatist attitude [at the CIA], it was positivemaking the enemy [Soviets] hemorrhage. But I dont play ball that way. Its either black or white, win or lose. I dont go for a tie. (Mirrors one biographers conclusion about Lord Nelsons #1 differentiating attribute: [Other] admirals were more frightened of losing than anxious to win.) Repeat: The goal is noble but the

work is Relationships & Networking & Politics. Even if the issue is deeply technical, the 17. implementation bit (that all important last 98%) is all about politics-relationships. 18. Recruit a politics-networking maestro. Charlie Wilson had this part down, and he needed help with the doing. If you are the doer, then you must find the politician-networker. They are a special breedand worth as much as the doer. (The legendary community organizer Saul Alinsky pointed out the difference between organizers and leaders. Leaders are

the visible ones, out there giving the speeches and manning the picket lines. The largely invisible organizer worries about recruiting the folks who will be on that picket line, settling disputes about who goes whereand procuring the busses to get the picketers to the right place at the right time with the necessary signs and bullhorns. I firmly believe that Alinskys Rules For Radicals is the best project management manual ever written.) 18. Recruit a politics-networking maestro. Charlie Wilson had this part down, and he needed help with the doing. If you are the doer, then you must find

the politician-networker. They are a special breedand worth as much as the doer. (The legendary community organizer Saul Alinsky pointed out the difference between organizers and leaders. Leaders are the visible ones, out there giving the speeches and manning the picket lines. The largely invisible organizer worries about recruiting the folks who will be on that picket line, settling disputes about who goes whereand procuring the busses to get the picketers to the right place at the right time with the necessary signs and bullhorns. I firmly believe that Alinskys Rules For Radicals is the best project management

manual ever written.) 19. Think QQ/Quintessential Quartet. Passion poobah and chief storyteller. Anal doer. Financier. Networker-political master-recruiter-in-chief. 20. When a project is unusual-risky, never, ever waste time or capital going go up the chain of command. Risk aversion rises as one nears the top everywhere. Constantly devise and try and discard and re-revise end runs that build the

network, add to knowledge, and create small wins that start the process mushrooming. Be polite to your boss (Gust wasnt, there are exceptions to every rule), but do not waste time on him! 21. Demo! Demo! Demo! Get some little thing done no matter how grand the goalyou need visual evidence of hope. Demo redux: Plant a field of seeds, most will die, a few will growand pay special attention to the wildflowers. Fill the air with 22.

possibility, energy, actionno matter that 96.3% will come to naught. 23. Take chances on unusual talent, regardless of formal rank. Mike Vickers, a junior (GS-11) officer was given enormous responsibility because of his demonstrated skills and tenacity and creativity. 24. Recruit peculiar talent with no investment in conventional solutions. Most of what you do wont workdont spend ages trying to stuff square pegs in round holes. Cultivate a Special Network of

Weirdos, often junior, who bring no baggage to the party. Create a small, insanely committed band of brothers to act as mostly invisible orchestrators. When all was said and done, Gust 25. Avarkotos and his tiny (never more than a half dozen) nerve center in the CIA never got even a smidgen of recognition for what was the Agencys biggest success. But his little team did the work of hundreds

in a true revolutionary mission, the core group must number <10. Ive long used the (stolen from Lockheed) term skunkworks to describe such small bands of insanely determined renegades. 26. The Band of Brothers-Skunkworks must be physically separated from top management. In Gusts case it was just a few floors of insulationbut even that is essential. 27. Think, subconsciously long haul. A small act of recognition toward a Major in an allys military

pays off Big Time 15 years later when he is Chief of Staff of the Armyone never knows, but stitch enough of these events together, and the odds of one paying off go waaaaay up. That is, passion for todays action is paramountbut always, always, always think consciously about Network Investment. (Remember, R.O.I.R.return On Investment in Relationships.) 28. K.I.S.S. Our Afghan allies drove the Soviets crazy less with big weapons (oh so difficult for an irregular program to acquire) than with an endless and ever-varying stream of simple (cheap, reliable, easy to train, easy to transport) weapons such as bicycle

bombs (shades of our problems in Iraq). 29. Plan for the real world. Mike Vickers was a genius at understanding the way things really were in the field his logistics programs reflected that. No pie-in-the-sky assumptions! 30. Cut red tape. What we did in one month with Charlie would have taken us nine years to accomplish. (Approval process in Congress, 8 days for 9 month procedure to get $$ transferred) My longtime definition: Boss = Chief hurdle remover. Which (again) means the boss must be master of the intricacies of the political process. A little known congressman,

Tom DeLay became one of the most powerful people in America by total mastery of the political rules. In a business project, this means, say, total mastery of the clients purchasing processincluding total comprehension of the power politics going on at the moment. 31. Dont document it! Charlie Wilson and Gust Avarkotos cut cornersto succeed against the powers that be you will to. Keep documentation to a minimumwatch your emails!! Luck!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

32. Never deny the reality of lucky (or unlucky) breaks; realizing that allows you to stay in the game, playing hand after hand until your cards come inor the time comes to fold. The Game Aint Over Until the Fat Lady Sings. I call them the yoiks, which actually stands for un33. intended consequences. After the Russians had withdrawn from Afghanistan, the U.S. once again returned to benign neglect

the result was, indirectly, 9-11 orchestrated from Afghanistan by some of the people we had supported a decade earlier. As to not finishing the chore, Charlie Wilson said that the defeat of the Soviets in Afghanistan, their first in the Cold War and a spur to the unraveling of the Evil Empire, was a glorious accomplishment that changed the world. And then we f&*^ed up the end game. Im with Wilson, regardless of todays threats; as one who lived through the entire Cold War, we are indeed now free of the not particularly low odds threat of planetary extinction. (See my Post of 1231.07 on Lieutenant Colonel Stanislav Petrov and the immanent end of the world on 26 September 1983.) But thats not the point eitherinstead it is

the more general axiom that you never know what new can of worms you are openingwhich to me, of course, makes the linear, logical approach to planning and life so laughable. Well, I guess we all need our illusions, and if plans can proved such comfort, ridiculous as they are, its fine by me. Concluding reminder: Any project worth doing is worth doing because in some small or large way it challenges the way we do things around here. Moreover, it is a given bosses are primarily hired to be cops

who make sure that we do things the way we do things around here. Id guess that 98% of projects fail in terms of even near-total implementation. And 98% of the 98% failures are the results of lousy political and networking skillsnot selection of the wrong project management software package. Hence the work of projects is the political implementation of ideas and processes which necessarily engender emotional resistance by the powers that be. We who would change things are insurgents. Charlie and Gust were insurgents who fought, for years, an inch at a time through the corridors of power from Congress to the CIA headquarters in Langley VA to the presidential palaces

in Pakistan and Egypt and even Israel. Notes from William Easterlys: The White Mans Burden: Why the Wests Effort to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and so Little Good

The topic is, of course, of the utmost significance to the state of human affairs. Beyond that, this masterpiece is perhaps the best book Ive read on implementation in general. $2.3 trillion The West spent

on foreign aid over the last five decades and still has not managed to get twelvecent medicines to children to prevent half of all malaria deaths. The West spent $2.3 trillion and still not managed to get three dollars to each new mother to prevent five But I and many other like-minded people keep trying, not to abandon aid to the poor, but to make sure it reaches them.

million child deaths. Easterly, maligned by many, is the archenemy of the Big Plan [his capital letters, not mine] sent from afar; and the vociferous fan of practical activities of those he calls

Searchers who learn the ins and outs of the culture, politics and local conditions on the ground in order to use local levers and local players, and get those 12cent medicines to community members. Read on, Planners vs Searchers In foreign aid, Planners announce good intentions but dont motivate anyone to carry them out; Searchers find things that

work and get some reward. Planners raise expectations but take no responsibility for meeting them; Searchers accept responsibility for their actions; Planners determine what to supply; Searchers find out what is in demand . Planners apply global blueprints; Searchers adapt to local conditions . Planners at the top lack knowledge of the bottom; Searchers find out what the reality is at the bottom. Planners never hear whether the planned recipients got what they needed; Searchers find out if the customer is satisfied. A Planner thinks he already knows the answers; he thinks of poverty as a technical engineering problem that his answers will solve. A Searcher

admits he doesnt know the answers in advance; he believes that poverty is a complicated tangle of political, social, historical, institutional, and technological factors; he hopes to find answers to individual problems only by trial and error experimentation. A planner believes outsiders know enough to impose solutions; a Searcher believes only insiders have enough knowledge to find solutions, and that most This may be the most illuminating synopsis of implementation issues that I have ever stumbled across.

Derived from the above and more, I have extracted a series of lessons from the Easterly book. These implementation lessons are, in fact, universal: Lesson (#1 of sooooooo many): Show up! (On the ground, where the actionand possible implementationis.) Lesson: Invest in ceaseless study of conditions on the groundsocial and political and historical and systemic.

Ninety percent of success is showing up. Woody Allen Lesson: Talk to the locals. Lesson: Listen to the locals. Lesson: Hear the locals. Lesson: Listen to the locals. Lesson: Hear the locals. Lesson: Listen to the locals.

Lesson: Hear the locals. Lesson: Listen to the locals. Lesson: Hear to the locals. Lesson: Listen to the locals. Lesson: Hear to the locals. Lesson: Respect the locals. Lesson: Empathize with the locals. Have a truly crappy office, and

other un-trappings! Lesson: Lesson: Try to blend in, adopting local customs, showing deference were necessaryalmost everywhere; and never interrupt the big man in front of his folk, even, or especially, if you think he is 180 degrees off. Lesson: Seek out the local leaders second cousins, etc, to gain indirect assess over their uncle twice removed! (Etc & etc.)

Lesson: Have a truly crappy office, and other un-trappings! Lesson: Remember, you do not in fact have the answers despite your PhD with, naturally, honors, from the University of Chicagowhere you were mentored by not one, but two, Nobel Laureates in economics. Lesson: Regardless of the enormity of the problem, proceed by trial (manageable in size) and error, error, error. (Failure motto: Do it right the first time! Success motto: Do it right the 37th

time! And hustle through those 37 triessee the We made mistakes, of course. Most of them were omissions we didnt think of when we initially wrote the software. We fixed them by doing it over and over, again and again. We do the same today. While our competitors are still sucking their thumbs trying to make the design perfect, were already on prototype version #5.

By the time our rivals are ready with wires and screws, #10. It gets back to planning versus acting: We act from day one; others plan how to planfor months. Bloomberg by we are on version

Bloomberg Lesson: The process of political-community engagement must also be approached as a trial and error learning process. Lesson: Always alter the experiment to accommodate local needsthe act of apparent local modification per se is critical, as every community leader, in order for them to accept ownership and demonstrate to their constituents that they are in

charge, must feel as if they have directly and measurably influenced the experiment. [See the next four slides.] Lesson: Growth (the experimental and expansionemulation process) must be organic, and proceed at a measured pacenudged, not hurried. Lesson: Speed kills! (To a point.) By and large, the messiness and inefficiency of the local political process must be honored.

Buy inOwnershipAuthorial bragging rights-Born again One Line of Code! Champion = It works this way, Tom. Youre talking to a guy whos important to implementation down where the rubber meets the road. Hes skepticalhe either really is, or its the act he chooses to play. You go over the thing with him and he has a thousand objections. You nod your head a

lot, and take copious notes. Then you go back to your guys, and you find a few places where you can very specifically accommodate him. You make the changes, even if they are pretty ugly. Then you go back to him, and show him exactly what youve done. You have a born again supporter. You took him seriouslyand through the changes, hes now your co-inventor, your savior. Now hes doing the selling for you. Hey, the whole damn thing wouldnt have worked were it not for his interjectionsthats the way he frames it to his folks. I tell you, it never fails. Source: Australian IS-IT chief, mid-sized company in financial services

Noth-ing is scalable! * Nothing is scalable!* *Every replication must exude the perception of uniquenesseven if it means a half-step

backwards. (It wouldnt have worked if we hadnt done it our way.) Scalable is one of those [hot] words, as in, Will it scale? Replication is of paramount importance. But a/the prime failure of many-most aid programs has been to achieve a small success with a demo and then immediately shove the resulting approach, as though it were Biblical, lock-stockand-barrel down the throats of 200 unsuspecting communitieswith orders to get it done by

yesterday. Smart people do demo after demo after demo, and then begin to scale in earnest. But they clearly understand that scalability is never more than, say, a 75% affairboth real and perceived tailoring is required at every stop, to adjust to local conditions and to engage the local power structure by allowing-encouraging them to make it their own ! Speed kills! Lesson: Short-circuiting political process kills!

Lesson: Premature rollout kills! Lesson: Too much publicityvisibility kills! Lesson: Too much money kills! Lesson: Too much technology kills! Lesson: There are obviously limits to all these thingsone, for instance, cant wait forever for the political process to play itself out. On the other hand, the principal sin of the planners who

make Easterlys [and my] skin crawl is shortchanging local politics and politicians, throwing money at the problem, counting on clever technologies to carry the day, publicizing successes that arent, etc. Lesson: Outsiders, to be effective, must have genuine appreciation of and affection for the locals with whom and for whom they are working! Lesson: Condescension kills mostsaid locals know

unimaginably more about life than well-intentioned do gooders, young or even, alas, not so young. Lesson: Progress MUST be consistent with local politics on the ground in order to raise the odds of sustainability. Lesson: You will never-ever fix everything at once or by the time you finishin our Constitutional Convention in 1787, George Washington only got about 60% of what he wanted! Lesson: Never forget the atmospherics, such as numerous celebrations for tiny milestones reached, showering praise

on the local leader and your local cohorts, while you assiduously stand at the back of the crowdetc. Lesson: The experiment has failed until the systems and political rewards, often small, are in place, with Beta tests completed, to up the odds of repetition. Lesson: Most of your on-the-ground staff must consist of respected localsthe de facto or de jure Chairman or CEO must be a local; you must be virtually invisible. Lesson: Spend enormous pointless social time with the local political leadersin Gulf War I, Norm Schwarzkopf spent his

evenings, nearly all of them, drinking tea until 2AM or 3AM with the Saudi crown prince; he called it his greatest contribution! Lesson: Keep your start up plan simple and short and filled with question marks in order to allow others to have the last word. (I once did the final draft of a at proposal, making it as flawless as could be. I gave it to my boss,

pre Microsoft Word, and he proceeded to cut it up and tape the pieces back together, and conspicuously cross out several paragraphs of my obviously and labored over brilliant prose that he had agreed to. Tom, he said as I recall, we want the rest of the committee [of important, or least self-important folks] to feel as though they are participating and that you and I are a navenot confront them with a beautiful plan that shouts Dont you dare alter a word.) Lesson: For projects involving children or health or education or community development or sustainable small-business growth (most projects), women are by far the most

reliable and most central and most indirectly powerful local players in even the most chauvinist settingstheir characteristic process of implementation by indirection means life or death to sustainable project success; moreover, the expanding concentric circles of womens traditional networking processes is by far the best way to scale up/expand a program. (Men should not even try to understand what is taking place. Among other things, this networking indirection-largely invisible process will seemingly take forever by most mens action now,

skip steps S.O.P.and then, from out of the blue, following an eternity of rambling discussions-on-top-oframbling-discussions, you will wake up one fine morning and discover that the thing is done that everything has fallen in place overnight and that ownership is nearly universal. Concomitant imperative; most of your (as an outsider) staff should be women, alas,most likely not visibly in charge. For projects involving children or health or education or community development or sustainable small-business

growth (most projects), women are by far the most reliable and most central and most indirectly powerful local players even in the most chauvinist settings. Reminders: Show up!

(Stick around!) Listen! (Listen! Listen! Listen!) Study local conditions! Stay in the background! (Always defer to local leaderseven bad ones. Do your workarounds in private.) Adapt to local conditions!! (No cookie-cutters, please!!) Experiment! (Manageable in size.) (Trial and error, error, errorso, hustle.)

(Celebrate the tiniest successesno such thing as too much.) Get the boring supporting systems-infrastructure in place! Always: Local politics rules! (Like it or not.) Nudge. (Do not force things because of your schedule.) Women are our customers, premier partners in sustainable implementation. Commentary on David O. Stewarts The Summer of

1787: The Men Who Invented the Constitution Tom Peters/0409.08 What does the U.S. Constitutional Convention of 1787 have to teach you and me, in the Age of the Internet, about implementing our wee pet project? A lot, Ill argue. Whether the topic is mundane or grand, and whether the date is 1787 or 2008, the essential

human basics of implementation are exactly the sameand overlooking them is the universal cause of failure. So lets look at the little human lessons that underpinned the creation of this monumental document Drafting the U.S. Constitution in Philadelphia in the muggy summer of 1787, was, literally, Americas defining moment. The war against the British had officially ended with the Treaty of Paris. But pirates still plied the seas, sanctioned by the British, harassing American commerce. The loose nature of our founding Articles of Confederation made any coherent response impossible. Chaos and clashing self-interest had advanced to the point that several states were independently pursuing alliances and treaties with a

variety of European Great Powers. Pragmatic leaders from various states, meeting informally, decided that the time had come to do something, damn near anything, about the growing anarchy, that also included the rise of violent local militias. Hence, the Convention staggered to order, with some enthusiasm, a lot of frustration, with various parties taking it seriouslyor not; and, as always in human affairs, animated primarily by narrow, irreconcilable geographic-commercial-personal interests. That is, as useful and enduring and inspiring and earth-shakingas the product (U.S. Constitution) turned out to be, in hindsight, the process of its birth, and the players involved, not all Washingtons and Franklins by a long shot, was as messy and slapdash as is the case in the commonplace history of human affairs. All of this is described with novelistic intensity in The Summer of 1787: The Men Who Invented the Constitution, Constitution, by David O. Stewart. What so captivated me about this fast-paced narrative, given my professional interests, was that so grand a result (in retrospectno attendee, beset by Philadelphias

black flies and, in many cases, worrying about personal finances deteriorating back home, would have imagined the Holy Aura that was later attributed to the gathering) had emerged from such garden variety human wheeling and dealing, with chance paramount, the role of Black Flies not to be under-estimated, and the low and loathsome playing almost as big a role as the best and brightest in the nations history. Truth is, this book has changed my professional life. That is, it has reminded me of the true basics of human achievementgrand and mundane alike. We may talk ceaselessly about globalization and blue oceans and disruptive innovation and brand you, but we errI err!when these high falutin terms distract us from assessing and sharpening the tools that are the true bedrock of the true byproduct of organizational and individual lifei.e., getting things done, or GTD as one of my pragmatic Stanford professors called it. For it is invariably the failures on the GTD Dimension, not the failures of vision or strategy, that lead to ther quagmire in Iraq or the screwed-up implementation of a business-process project. In the end, itmanagement, lifeis all about human foibles, all about GTD, all about you and

me muddling through to inch the personal or organizational world along another millimeter or two. So, in this instance, the drafting of the Constitution, Americas most important hour-summer, we see, through an electron microscope (The (The Summer of 1787), 1787), an act of GTD driven by the factors-stuff that really matter in the ever-elusive real worldwhich should be the fodder for management gurus attempting to be of some help to those going about their day to day affairs, so much more often mundane than grand. A sampling of my notes on the book, and my translation into lessons learned, follow: Horse trading and deals struck in the shadowy corners of pubs was

*** (mostly) the order of the day. ***The pursuit of practical, unfair regional economic advantage, not abstract theories of government, was the determining factor in most deliberations; for instance, deals struck between small states, seeking clout and economic success, and South Carolina kept slavery alive. (See also, for example, An Economic Interpretation of the Constitution of the United States , by Charles Beard.)

***There were gaping holes in the document, such as the continuation of slavery (it took the Civil War, 74 years later, to sort things out) and the glossing over of issues of citizens rights. (To be sure, subsequently dealt with by the first 10 amendments.) *** Muddling through, or satisficing, was very much the constant state of affairs. (Muddling througha term coined by Yale political scientist Charles Lindblom. Satisficing, doing a satisfactory job, based on real world complications which cause sub-optimal results, was a word coined by Herbert Simon, for which he won a Nobel Prize in

economics.) ***Luck was here, as everywhere, essential. At one point, as deliberations on the most important and contentious topic of proportional representation completely bogged down, July 4 popped up on the calendar through sheer luck. Many of the delegates were Revolutionary War veterans, and the Technicolor memory of the intensity and duration and passions of the struggle was an extraordinary motivator; pettiness was pushed slightly and briefly aside and the logjam was broken up in fairly short order. ***Phillys famous summer black flies played a role, leading to dispirited attitudes, sessions cut short and

the like. Showing up was the #1 rule of success. Only 11 of 13 states bothered to *** attend the ConventionRhode Island never sent delegates, New Hampshires arrived two months late, and New Yorks folks never showed up in numbers enough to amount to a quorum. Overall, only 30 of 60 official delegates were normally in attendance hence one soul, of whatever description, saint or

scoundrel, could and did make a helluva difference time and time again. ***Despite the hardships, George Washington was almost singular for showing up, not missing a day, though as presiding officer he seldom spoke. His magisterial presence per se was a far more important contribution than his ideasand his astounding demonstration, by his consistent presence, of the importance of turning out something saved the day on several critical occasions. ***Money in the bank, or the absence thereof. Many

of the delegates were in less than robust financial shape; hence they were continually distracted by having to hurry home (no small thing in 1787), and influenced by their perceived need to get this damn thing over with. Many an important clause was retained or excised because members were motivated to cut deliberations short, and get on with it, before my creditors foreclose. ***Raw numbers of delegates greatly influenced the outcome. Wee Delaware had five delegates, only four states had more; hence (wee) Delaware provided an unfair share of warm bodies on the

committees that controlled the outcome in most instances. *** Hanging in in per se, as usual, counted big time: Lesser known figures stepped forward and carried the banner for the small states. What they lacked in reputation or talent, they made up with tenacity. (Success seems to be largely a matter of hanging on after others have let go. William Feather, author) ***Working up early first drafts, brought to the conclave, had great impact; that is, others were automatically in a responsive mode, and initiative went

to the drafters. ***Annoying personality traits were of the utmost importance. For example, Marylands Luther Martin was left off all the important committees because he had a reputation for bombast and being windyand who wants a windy guy in a tiny committee room, with the windows closed for security reasons, in Philadelphia, in August with the damn black flies causing their painful bites with lingering aftereffects. (We have black fly season in Vermonttrust me, they are awful beasts.) ***Presentation skills, good and bad and mediocre, also had startling impact.

Lesser known figures stepped forward and carried the banner for the small states. What they lacked in reputation or talent, they made up with tenacity. I neither contend that Conventions animating ideasideals per se were of scant importance, nor that the

presence of Washington, Madison, Franklin et al. was of no import. But I do vociferously contend that mundane variables, such as those enumerated above, shaped the great document far more than most realizethey were in fact determining more often than not. Face it, people will be people, ego and frailties and selfinterest always lurking or on stage, no matter how grand the occasion subsequently proves to have been. In fact, old-fashioned hangovers were probably of more than passing importance to our glorious document. Stewart reports that at one evening gathering of most of the delegates, about 50 in this rare instance, alcoholic consumption consisted of seven large bowls

of rum punch, over 100 bottles of wine, and almost fifty bottles of beer. (My translation, to save you from doing the math, is four or five hard-liquor drinks, two bottles of wine and one beer per man, doubtless followed by a discussion of the interstate commerce clauseno wonder our modern day Justices of the Supreme Court have so much trouble interpreting original intent.) Lessons from the summer of 1787

*** Show up!!!!!!!!!!!! *** Keep showing up!! *** Control the process through indirect actions, like doing first drafts, writing Minutes. *** Remember the social gracesyour emotional presentation of self is more important than even all important!!! *** Hang in! Tenacity-relentlessness rules! (Wear the bastards down. No kidding, this is a matchless success tool.) *** Theres no such thing as a dull meeting.

(No kidding!) Every get together is an opportunity to press your agenda, directly or indirectly, to perform a small favor with the expectation of return on investment at some point in the future. *** Bite your tongue and listen, listen, listeneven to bores. Nothing wins support like effective listening; its the greatest gift you can give anyone!! (This is triply important when you are desperate to

correct something someone has to say, even an enemy of your causeattentive listening is a peerless win em over strategic tool.) *** Sub-committees rule! Its the little chances to become Master of Something and performinfluence in a small group setting that lead to the accumulation of power and the ability to control the flow in an area important to you. *** Continually illustrate your ability to perform

well at almost any task and build a towering reputation *** Cool off! No passion, no success! Too much abrasiveness in pursuit of a cause that inflames you kills opportunity to succeed like nothing else. (Folks love to put an abrasive person in his place, even if they agree with him.) *** Take a punch and keep on trucking. Losses are common

live with em, take em with good grace, and then persevere through out-persevering the other guy/s. (*** Speaking of punch, out-drinking the other guy sure worked in the summer of 1787. Reach your own conclusions here ) *** Grow up, accept life. Life, effectiveness is indeed about horse trading as often as notand at times consorting with ones enemies. (The enemy of my enemy is my friend. Keep your passion, stay above the waterline on issues of deep principalbut accept, and embrace, the messy-as-hell real world!

game. *** Be ready with Plan B. Repeat: Nothing in the real world follows the script. *** Nobody, even George Washington, gets more than about 60% of what they want! *** Keep your word. A reputation for integrity is priceless. *** Dont bite off more than you can chew, even when cant miss opportunities

to further your cause ariseoverloading and thence compromising effectiveness is a big black eye. *** Do something! Small wins, accumulated regularly, build momentum! Regardless of the topicmundane or grand it is attending to the same

mundane human timeless basics that shape the outcome and determine the degree of implementation. The Master of GTD* is the true Master of the Universe. Lesson of Lessons: *GTD/Getting Things Done EXCELLENCE. 4/40.

Some time ago I was more or less asked, Whats it all about, Alfie? I pondered, and then said that I figured Id learned Four Big Things between 1966 (the beginning of my managerial careercourtesy the U.S. Navy) and 2006 (when I was asked the question. I added that I thought that was a pretty good yieldone idea per decade. 4/40

(Decentralization/Execution/Accountability/6:15A.M.) DECENTRALIZATION . EXECUTION. ACCOUTABILITY. 6:15A.M. De-central-iza-tion! Decentralizatio n is not a piece

of paper. Its not me. Its either in your heart, or not. Brian Joffe/BIDvest If if feels painful and scarythats real delegation Caspian Woods, small biz owner

The True Logic* of Decentralization: 6 divisions = 6 tries 6 divisions = 6 DIFFERENT leaders = 6 INDEPENDENT tries = Max probability of win 6 divisions = 6 very DIFFERENT leaders = 6 very INDEPENDENT tries = Max probability of far out/3-sigma win *Driver: Law of Large #s

Best practice = ZERO Standard Deviation Enemy #1 I.C.D. Inherent/Inevitable/

Immutable Centralist Drift Note 1: Note 2: Jim Burkes 1-word vocabulary: No. No problems = No progress. [Period.] Decentralization vs Centralization = Thats All

There Is (from childrearing 101 to the Federalist Papers to Org.2007) The Earls & Dukes vs King John (The Magna Carta) The Continental Congress vs the Constitution Jefferson vs Adams Sloan vs Ford

GE vs All comers HP vs HP Peters vs Hammer Mintzberg vs Porter Or Is It Mike Whos Crazy? Isnt it crazy that your child is learning different material and being held to a different standard than, say, your sisters children in another

state? Mike Petrilli, Fordham Institute (U.S. News & World Report, 0305.07) Ex-ecution! Execution is the job of the business leader. Larry Bossidy & Ram

Charan/ Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done Execution is a systematic process of rigorously discussing hows and whats,

tenaciously following through, and ensuring accountability. Larry Bossidy & Ram Charan/ Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done = (1) sum of Projects Goal (Vision) (2) sum of Milestones =

project (3) rapid Review + Truth-telling = Costco figured out the big, simple things and executed with total fanaticism. Charles Munger, Berkshire Hathaway The Big Three Justas The strategy is right. Its just

a communications problem. The plan is dead onits just an implementation problem. Look, weve got the strategy rightwe just need to fix the people bit. "Because we are such poor implementors does not mean laws of success [underpinning built to last] do not exist. Comment at tompeters.com (0625.07) Bingo. nothing amuses me more than, "It's

just an implementation problem.* Good God, that's the whole damn reason we wrote In Search of Excellence 25 years ago! McKinsey invented "perfect" strategiesIt was just that our clients were too stupid to implement!!! It reminds me of the great ad man David Ogilvy, "If it doesn't sell it was a bad aDregardless of the prizes it won. Implementation is the all-important "last 99%" per me. Companiese.g. GMcould indeed last forever, save for lousy

implementation.** *The close kin, an old joke, This would work fine if it werent for the damn people. **FYI, I apparently wrote, at Stanford, the first doctoral dissertation Dick (Build!) Dan (Report on what not built tangible v. palpable) Toms Change Rules

Cause. (pissed off.) Try it. (S.A.V.) Fail. Forward. Fast. Quests. Demos. Heroes. Stories. Boonies. (Parallel universe.) <12. Just Say No: Normal. Attitude>Ability. Wow. Insanely great. Sell! Sell! Sell! Master politics!

Recently I asked three corporate executives what decisions they had made in the last year that would not have been made were it not for their corporate plans. All had difficulty identifying one such decision. Since all of the plans are marked secret or confidential, I asked them how their competitors might benefit from possession of their plans. Each answered with

embarrassment that their competitors would not benefit. Russell Ackoff (from Henry Mintzberg, The Rise and Fall of Strategic Planning) GRANT 0831.2007 almost inhuman disinterestedness in strategy Josiah

Bunting on U.S. Grant (from Ulysses S. Grant) U. S. Grant *No interest in grand strategy. *Do the thing until it is done. *Do not over complicate. *Do the next thing. *Pleasure in perseverance per se.

*Not ask for help or advice. *Not complain of difficulties or ask for more time or resources McClellan: delay; plead for more forces Grant: When do I start? What I want is to advance. Source: Josiah Bunting, Ulysses S. Grant Relentless: One of my superstitions had always been when I started to go anywhere or

not to turn back , or stop, to do anything, until the thing intended was accomplished. Grant Relentless: One of my superstitions had always been when I started to go anywhere, or to do anything, not to turn back, or stop, until the thing intended was accomplished. I have

frequently started to go places where I had never been and to which I did not know the way, depending upon making inquiries along the road. And if I got past the place without knowing it, I would not turn back but instead go on until a road was found turning in the right direction, take that, and come in on the other side. Grant Ac-counta-bil-ity! head of Chrysler

from 2000 to 2005, denied he should take any responsibility for the U.S. I cant say that I dont know what my teachers were doing in the classroom. I am still responsible if a child gets lost. Enron juror Freddy Delgado,

elementary school principal 30% MH: 80% CF: (no salesfolk) (salesfolk)

Monkeys cant live in midair! Bob Townsend GE has set a standard of candor. There is no puffery. There isnt an ounce of denial in the place.

Kevin Sharer, CEO Amgen, on the GE mystique (Fortune) Walter Reed SECDEF 6:15A.M . But its

only 2am! Where are you going? But its only 2am. You see, you can live your life at 120 miles an hour, and thats pretty impressive. But its not good enough. Unless you live at 150 miles an hour, the world will pass you by, HRH Prince Alwaleed* *1 day: 573 people met separately, 200 phone calls, 100 text messages, etc Source: Prince Alwaleed, Inside the private world of the Middle Easts

most powerful investor cover story, The Business, 0519.07 DECENTRALIZATION . EXECUTION. ACCOUTABILITY. 2a.m. Excellence 1/40:

Try It! Tom Peters 1/40 I lied. Ive actually only learned one thing in the last 40 yearsTry it! Try it. Try it. Try it. ry it. Try it. Screw up. Try it. Try it. Try

. Try it. Try it. Try i ry it. Screw it up. i Try it. Try it. try it. What makes God laugh? People making plans! "Life is what

happens while you're busy making other plans. John Lennon The secret of fast progress is inefficiency, fast and furious and numerous failures.

Kevin Kelly Active mutators in placid times tend to die off. They are selected against. Reluctant mutators in quickly changing times are also selected against. Carl Sagan & Ann Druyan, Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors

do things. things We have a strategic plan. Its called doing things. Herb Kelleher do them.

A man approached JP Morgan, held up an envelope, and said, Sir, in my hand I hold a guaranteed formula for success, which I will gladly sell you for $25,000. Sir, JP Morgan replied, I do not know what is in the envelope, however if you show me, and I like it, I give you my word as a gentleman that I will pay you what you ask. The man agreed to the terms, and handed over the envelope. JP Morgan opened it, and extracted a single sheet of paper. He gave it one look, a mere glance, then handed the piece of paper back to the gent.

And paid him the agreed upon $25,000. 1. Every morning, write a list of the things that need to be done that day. 2. Do them. Source: Hugh MacLeod/tompeters.com/NPR

drill. This is so simple it sounds stupid, but it is amazing how few oil people really you only find oil if you drill wells. understand that

You may think youre finding it when youre drawing maps and studying logs, but you have to drill. Source: The Hunters, by John Masters, Canadian O & G wildcatter try things. things We made mistakes, of course. Most of them were

omissions we didnt think of when we initially wrote the software. We fixed them by doing it over and over, again and again. We do the same today. While our competitors are still sucking their thumbs trying to make the design perfect, were already on prototype #5. #10. It gets back to version By the time our rivals are ready

with wires and screws, we are on version planning versus acting: We act from day one; others plan how to planfor months. Hizzonor and the Governator*: The New Action Heroes

(Time/07.23.07) *Bloomberg, Schwarzenegger Experimen t fearlessly Source: BW0821.06, Type A Organization Strategies/ How to Hit a Moving Target Tactic #1

We ground up more pig brains! JM The True Logic* of Decentralization: 6 divisions = 6 tries 6 divisions = 6 DIFFERENT leaders = 6 INDEPENDENT tries = Max probability of

win 6 divisions = 6 very DIFFERENT leaders = 6 very INDEPENDENT tries = Max probability of far out/3-sigma win *Driver: Law of Large #s Keep Trying! Relent

This [adolescent] incident [of getting from point A to point B] is notable not only because it underlines Grants fearless horsemanship and his determination, but also it is the first known example of a very important Grant had an extreme, almost phobic dislike of turning back and retracing his steps. If he peculiarity of his character: set out for somewhere, he would get there somehow, whatever the difficulties that lay in his way. This idiosyncrasy would turn out to be one

the factors that made him such a formidable general. Grant would always, always press onturning back was not an option for him. Michael Korda, Ulysses Grant Relentless: One of my superstitions had always been when I started to go anywhere or not to turn back , or stop, to do anything,

until the thing intended was accomplished. Grant incredible power of endurance political colleague, on Nicolas Sarkozy, repeatedly written off by the public and

the celestial powers of French politics (FT, 0515.07) Success = Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815-1902), Lucretia Mott, Martha Wright, Mary Ann McClintock, Jane Hunt (07.13.1848/Seneca falls ny) + 72 years, 1 month, 5 days (08.18.1920/nashville tn)

Success seems to be largely a matter of hanging on after others have let go.

Feather, author William Relent 25 2,500 63 48 5,000,000 2,500,000

15 SERIOUS PLAY Culture of Prototyping Effective prototyping may be the most valuable core

competence an innovative organization can hope to have. Michael Schrage Think about It!? Innovation = Reaction to the Prototype Source: Michael Schrage

You cant be a serious innovator unless and until you are ready, willing and able to seriously play. Serious play is not an oxymoron; it is the essence of innovation. Michael Schrage, Serious Play Learn not to be careful.

Photographer Diane Arbus to her students (Careful = The sidelines, sidelines from Harriet Rubin in The Princessa) The key to a great painting is the nerve, after weeks of effort, to bet the painting on the next brush stroke, Master musician,

San Francisco w thing Natural selection is death. ... Without huge amounts of death, organisms do not change over time. ... Death is the mother of

structure. ... It took four billion years of death ... to invent the human mind ... The Cobra Event FAIL, FAIL AGAIN. FAIL BETTER. Samuel Beckett Fail . Forward.

Fast. High Tech CEO, Pennsylvania Fail faster. Succeed Sooner. David Kelley/IDEO Sams Secret #1!

Reward excellent failures. Punish mediocre successes. Phil Daniels, Sydney exec If people tell me they skied all day

and never fell down, I tell them try a different mountain. Michael Bloomberg (BW/0625.07) In business, you reward people for taking risks. When it doesnt work out you promote them-because they were willing to try new things. If people tell me

they skied all day and never fell down, I tell them to try a different mountain. Michael Bloomberg (BW/0625.07) Read This! Richard Farson & Ralph Keyes: Whoever Makes the Most Mistakes Wins: The Paradox of Innovation

The Silicon Valley of today is built less atop the spires of earlier triumphs than upon the rubble of earlier debacles.Newsweek/ Paul Saffo The secret of fast progress is inefficiency, fast and furious and numerous failures. --Kevin Kelly

[other] admirals more frightened of losing than anxious to win On NELSON: try. Miss. try.

READY. FIRE! S.A. Ideas. Plans. Actions. We are in a brawl with no rules. Paul Allaire/Xerox:

TP: Theres [literally] only one Screw Around Vigorously! possible answer

RAF RFA RFFFA RFFFA FFFFA RAAAAAAAAAAA IID INID DSS* DSS**

*If In Doubt Do Some S$%^ (stuff) **If Not In Doubt Do Some S%*& Life 101: A 40-year Reflection Go on offense. Give everybody a shot. Decentralize. Try a bunch of stuff. Make it up as you go along. Get some stuff wrong. Laugh a lot.

Get some stuff right. Become a success. Extract lessons learned or best practices. Thicken the Book of Rules for Success. Become evermore serious. Enforce the rules to increasingly tight tolerances. Go on defense. Install walls. Protect-at-all-costs todays franchise. Centralize. Calcify. Install taller walls.

Write more rules. Become irrelevant and-or die. No try. No You miss 100% of the shots you never

take. Intelligent people can always come up with intelligent reasons to do nothing. Scott Simon Andrew Higgins , who built landing craft in WWII, refused to hire graduates of engineering schools.

He believed that they only teach you what you cant do in engineering school. He started off with 20 employees, and by the middle of the war had 30,000 working for him. He turned out 20,000 landing craft. D.D. Eisenhower told me, Andrew Higgins won the war for us. He did it without engineers. Stephen Ambrose/Fast Company Try.

Try. Try. Try. try. Try. Try. Try. Try. try. Try. Try.

Try. Try. try. Try. Try. Try. Try. try. Try. Try. Try. Try.

Excellence1982: The Bedrock Eight Basics 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. A Bias for Action

Close to the Customer Autonomy and Entrepreneurship Productivity Through People Hands On, Value-Driven Stick to the Knitting Simple Form, Lean Staff Simultaneous Loose-Tight Properties Innovation: Get

mad. Start Doing something about it. Now. The Limits of Systems Thinking:

Surprise, Transformation & Excellence Through Spontaneous Discovery The Limits of Systems Thinking: Surprise, Transformation & Excellence Through Spontaneous Discovery (1 of 2) This summer was the summer of brush clearing.

And, it turned out, much more. It started as simple exercise. After a day or two, scratches from head to toe, and enjoyment, I set myself a goal of clearing a little space to get a better view of one of the farm ponds. That revealed something else to my surprise. At a casual dinner, I sat next to a landscaper, and we got to talking about our farm and my skills with clipper, saw, etc. In particular, she suggested that I do some clearing around a few of our big boulders. Intrigued, I set about clearing, on our main trail, around a couple of said boulders. I was again amazed at the result. That in turn led to attacking some dense brush and brambles around some barely visible rocks that had always intrigued mewhich led to finding, in

effect, a great place for a more or less Zen garden, as weve taken to calling it. Which led to more and more. And more. (Especially a rock wall, a hundred or so yards long, that is a massive wonder next year Ill move up the hill behind itI can already begin to imagine what Ill discover, though my hunch will be mostly wrong, and end up leading me somewhere else.) The Limits of Systems Thinking: Surprise, Transformation & Excellence Through Spontaneous Discovery (2 of 2) To make a long story short:

I now have a new hobby, and maybe, ye gads, my lifes work for years to come. This winter Ill do a little, but I also plan to read up on outdoor spaces, Zen gardens, etc; visit some rock gardensspaces close by or amidst my travels; and, indeed, concoct a more or less plan (rough sketches) for next springs activitiesthough Im sure that what I do will move forward mostly by what I discover as I move forward. (what discovers itself may actually be a better way to put ittheres a hidden hand here.) As Im beginning to see it, this is at least a 10-year projectmaybe even a multi-generation project. I proceeded by trial and error and instinct, and each experiment led to/suggested another experiment (or 2 or 10) and to a greater understanding of potentialthe plan, though there was none, made itself. And it was far, far better (more ambitious, more interesting, more satisfying) than I would

have imagined. In fact, the result to date bears little or no relationship to what I was thinking about at the starta trivial self-designed chore may become the engine of my next decade; the brushcutting project is now leading Susan and I to view our entire property, and what it might represent, in a new light. I was able to do much more than Id dreamedoverall, and project by project. Systems thinking? It would have killed the whole thing. Is everything connected to every thin else? Well, duh. But I had no idea how everything was connected to everything else until I began (thank you, Michael Schrage) serious play. I proceeded by trial and error and instinct,

and each experiment led to/suggested another experiment (or 2 or 10) and to a greater understanding of potentialthe plan, though there was none, made itself. And it was far, far better (more ambitious, more interesting, more satisfying) than I would have imagined. In fact, the result to date bears little or no relationship to what I was thinking about at the starta trivial self-designed chore may become the engine of my next decade; the brushcutting project

is now leading Susan and I to view our entire property, and what it might becomerepresent, in a new light. Note (more of the same): Last year I got a pacemaker for Christmas (13 December, actually); the #1 no-no is using a chain saw. (The magnetic field is fearsome.) Taking that warning a step farther, I decided to do this project entirely with hand tools. Of course that means more exercisea good thing. But the great wonder, again unexpected, is that the resultant slowness and quiet is the de facto engine of my entire spontaneous discovery process. Note: Some of you will have discovered my implicit debt to the economist-of-freedom, F.A. Hayek. His stunningly clear view of

market capitalism as a spontaneous discovery process is my intellectual bedrock, my context for three decades in Silicon Valley, and now even for my recreational pursuits (which are, as noted, becoming so much more than that). Note (more of the same): Last year I got a pacemaker for Christmas (13 December, actually); the #1 no-no is using a chain saw. (The magnetic field is fearsome.) Taking that warning a step farther, I decided to do this project entirely with hand tools. Of course that means more exercisea good thing. But the great wonder, again unexpected, is that the resultant slowness and quiet is the de facto engine of my entire spontaneous discovery process.

Note: Some of you will have discovered my implicit debt to the economist-of-freedom, F.A. Hayek. His stunningly clear view of market capitalism as a spontaneous discovery process is my intellectual bedrock, my context for three decades in Silicon Valley, and now even for my recreational pursuits (which are, as noted, becoming so much more than that). How do I know what I think until I see what I say. C.K. Chesterton We made mistakes, of course. Most of them were omissions we didnt think of when we initially wrote the software. We

fixed them by doing it over and over, again and again. We do the same today. While our competitors are still sucking their thumbs trying to make the design perfect, were already on prototype version #5. By the time our rivals are ready with wires and screws, we are on version #10. It gets back to planning versus acting: We act from day one; others plan how to planfor months. Bloomberg by Bloomberg This is so simple it sounds stupid, but it is amazing how few oil people really understand that you only find oil if you drill wells. You may think youre finding it when youre drawing maps and studying logs, but you have to drill. The Hunters, by John Masters, Canadian Oil & Gas wildcatter

Experiment fearlessly BusinessWeek, in a Special Report, on the premier innovation strategy of the best innovators The secret of fast progress is inefficiency, fast and furious and numerous failures. Kevin Kelly, founding editor, Wired How do I know what I think until I see what I

say. C.K. Chesterton Your call BLAME NOBODY. EXPECT NOTHING. DO SOMETHING. Presentation Excellence:

The PresX56 A very senior executive [and friend] at an enormous, extremely technical company took me by complete surprise during an afterdinner conversation. He said that the #1 thing that tripped up the forward career progress of many of his senior guys was mediocre presentation skills. Well, Im not about to write a book on the topic, no matter the 2,500+ presentations under my belt. But that evening he laid out his top 10 messages for presenter. I demurredbut with my interest

stirred I took a swing the next morning. Alas, and no surprise, my top 10 soon became a {top 50 and change. It is offered herewith. Life = Talk Listen A Its true, in private and public life what we

do is talk and listen. I talk for a living. Barbara listens for a living (more or less). It also occurred, no surprise at all, that Talkin and Listenin are completely absent from the B-school course list. What follows, no grand effort to be sure, is some ideas about professional talking (presenting) and professional listening (interviewing). There is no genius herein but I do genuinely believe the topics should be staples of education from about age 12at the latest. (I actually pondered a book for a while. I was delighted

by its prospective title: Talk. Listen. ) Life = Talk Listen The problem with communication ...i s the ILLUSION that it has been accomplished.

George Bernard Shaw Presentation Excellence 1. Total commitment to the Problem/Project/Outcome 2. A compelling Story line/Plot 3. Enough data to sink a tanker (98% in reserve) 4. Know the data from memory; ability to manipulate the data in your head 5. Great Stories/Illustrations/Vignettes 6. Superb political antennae (you must play the room like a Virtuoso and be hyper-attentive to the likes of Body Language)

7. By hook or by crook CONNECT 7A. CONNECT! CONNECT! CONNECT! 8. Punch line/Plot Outline/WOW/Surprise in first one to two minutes Joe Kramer, welder: When my mothers toaster went on the fritz, I asked myself, If I were that toaster and didnt work, what would be wrong with me? Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi,

Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience, on empathetic identification* (Joe: burdens vs opportunities to master complex problems) (*BC vs JK) Presentation Excellence 9. Once youve won stop pushing (dont rub it in) 10. Be in command but dont show off (if youre brilliant theyll figure it out for themselves) 11. Pay attention to the Senior Person present, but not too much (dont look like/act like/be a suck up)

12. Brief the hell out of your champions before the presentation; insist that they make changes/fine tune ... they must own the outcome before the fact! 13. Dont try to score off your detractors be especially courteous to them (even if/especially if theyre jerks) 14. Adjust as you go: LET THE GROUP ARRIVE AT YOUR CONCLUSION! THEY MUST OWN IT (I knew that) IN THE END! Presentation Excellence 15. No more than THREE key points! Come at them in several

different ways. 16. No more than ONE point per slide! 17. Slides: NO CLUTTER!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! (no wee print/ charts/graphs) 18. Slides: Good quotes from the field. (Remember youre telling a story) 19. Be aware of differing cognitive styles, especially M-F 20. There must be surprise some key facts that are not commonly known/are counter-intuitive (no reason to do the presentation in the first place if there are no Surprises) 21. Summarize the argument/story from time to time 22. Include an Action Agenda that involves some small items that will be started/accomplished in the next 72 HOURS

(this ices commitment/practicality) Presentation Excellence 23. If you dont know something ADMIT IT! (this is actually a good thingas opposed to appearing as a know it all) 24. ASK FOR THE SALE! (Remember to be a closer) 25. This is War (a war for Hearts & Mind), but never forget that you are the Supplicant! 26. Data are imperative, but also play to Emotion. 27. Consider bringing along a customer (internal or perhaps external) for support 28. Be precisely clear where/when you intend to prototype and

that the prototype guinea pig is lined up (better yet, do the first, at least partial, prototype before the presentation) 29. Compromise but dont yield! (Lost battles are normal, no matter how agonizing) 30. Assume that you may be cut off at any moment, and be prepared to give on the spot a compelling 30-second to one- minute (no longer!) Brilliant Summary including Sales Pitch Presentation Excellence 31. Follow the Law of Recency: Make sure that you have been in the field with the key operating players more recently than anyone in the room

32. Make it clear that youve done a Staggering Amount of Homework, even though you are exhibiting but a tiny fraction allude to the tons of research that are available if desired by participants; offer deeper one-on-one briefings if desired 33. SMILE! RELAX (to a point) (fake it if necessary) (up tight is disastrous) (remember you are doing them a favor by sharing this Compelling Opportunity!) 34. EYE CONTACT!!!!!!! 35. Be shrewd: Override some interruptions; be attentive to others (distraction is okay and normal within limits!) 36. Becoming an Excellent Presenter is as tough as becoming a great baseball pitcher. THIS IS IMPORTANT and Presentation

Excellence is never accidental! (Work your buns off!) The only reason to give a speech is to change the world. JFK If all my possessions were taken from me

with one exception, I would choose to keep the power of speech, for by it I would regain all the rest. Daniel Webster Presentation Excellence 37. Practice but dont leave your game in the locker room. 38. Seek tips on how various participants play the [presentation] game 39. A Presentation is an Act (FDR: The President must be the

nations number one actor) 40. Remember, the presentation is about Change RESISTANCE IS NORMAL (in fact if theres little resistance then your Project is hardly a game changer) 41. Dress well. Dont over-dress. 42. Be early (obvious, but worth saying) 43. GET THE A/V RIGHT/PERFECT. 44. Dont bring a supporting horde a couple of back-ups is okay/enough 45. No matter how good you are youll have crappy days WEEP AND THEN GET BACK ON THE HORSE

Presentation Excellence 46. Speak in Plain English keep the jargon to a minimum 47. Make your Personal Commitment clear as a bell! 48. Emphasize competitive advantage and timeliness (act now), without stooping to ridiculous war-like language (tear the heart out of the competition) (in audiences with heavy female component, if you are male, avoid repetitive football analogues) 49. Underscore the USP/Unique Selling Proposition 50. Emphasize the Positive 51. Sell Novelty yet fit with core values

52. Remember JFKs immortal words: The only reason to give a speech is to change the world Presentation Excellence 53. Say what you have to say Clearly and then Say It Again & Again from slightly different angles 54. Make it clear that you are a Man/Woman of Action and Execution Excellence is your First, Middle, and Last Name! 55. Energy! Enthusiasm! (dont know the answer to, If you aint got it how do you get it?) 56. Enjoy it! This is a Hoot! THE ULTIMATE TURN ON!

Remember your Goal: Change the world! In classical times when Cicero had finished speaking, the people said, How well he spoke, but when Demosthenes had finished speaking, they Let us

march. said, Adlai Stevenson Let us march. Interviewing Excellence: The IntX31

Life = Talk Listen Interviewing Excellence 1. INTERVIEWING IS AN ART WORTH MASTERING! (Think Christiane Amanpour, Mike Wallace) 2. Dont overschedule2 or 3 in-depth interviews are a solid days work. (More than that is lunacy and will lead to shallow results.) 3. Save, if possible, the Big Guy/Gal until lastthat is, until you know what the hell youre doing!

4. Find a comfy/safe/neutral setting. THIS IS ALL IMPORTANT! (Worst case: You on the other side of his/her desk.) 5. Start with a little bit (LITTLE) of local small talk. But get some tips on the interviewee ahead of time; he may be one of the brusque ones who considers any small talk a waste of his Imperial Time. 6. DO YOUR DAMN HOME WORK! (On the interviewee, the subject matter.) 7. Concoct a LONG LIST of questions. (Youll only use 10% of it, but thats okay.) Interviewing Excellence 8. Prepare a SHORT LIST of questions you must get answered.

9. Begin by briefly reviewing your assignmentwhy youre here. 10. ALWAYS ASK FOR EXAMPLES! (When she says Customer Service is in good shape, you ask for specificshard data, recent Customer Service successes (and failures). And: PRECISELY WHO YOU CAN FOLLOW UP WITH TO GET MORE DETAIL. 11. STORIES! STORIES! STORIES! (You are in the Story Collection Business.) 12. Dress well. DONT OVERDRESS. (Look like they look, more or less; perhaps a touch more formalthis is a Serious Affair you are engaging in.) 13. Assume youll never get another chance to talk to this person. 14. Be personable, but more or less match the interviewees style.

(THIS IS HARD WORK!) 15. THINK SMALL! Please walk me in great detail through the [complaint resolution] process. Here, lets diagram it. Interviewing Excellence 16. For Gods sake, get to the Front Line! (The devil is in the details, and the details are to be found on the loading dock at 3a.m.) (YES 3A.M.) 17. Dont quit until you understand. THE INTERVIEWEE ALWAYS TALKS IN SHORTHANDusing the jargon of the Corporate Culture. Youve got to crack the code. (THIS IS ABOUT THE HARDEST THING TO DO, ESPECIALLY IF YOU ARE YOUNG AND UNCERTAIN:

Tell yourself you are here to ask Dumb Questionsthis is not a job interview. Again, think Mike Wallace: So did you in fact murder Mrs. Smith?) 18. Ignore generalizations! YOU ARE HERE IN SEARCH OF SPECIFICS!!! 19. CONTEXT! Get the corporate culturee.g. Shell is not ExxonMobil! Find out (from a set of interviewees) Core Values (in theory and in practice). Interviewing Excellence 20. Engage the Interviewee! GET HER TO DO SOME OF THE WORK! E.g., write out her view of the Ten Key Operative Core Valuesor

some such. 20A. ENGAGE! ENGAGE! ENGAGE! 21. You must come across as trustworthy. YOU ARE A DUMBO HERE TO LEARNNOT AN FBI AGENT IN DISGUISE. 22. Take me through yesterday. Get past the theoretical crap. Give me in excruciating detail an average day: YESTERDAY! (One hour/meeting at a time.) 23. If youre comfortable, lets go over your Calendar for the last month, so I can understand the flow of things. (Remember TPs Rule #1: YOU = YOUR CALENDAR.) 24. DONT LET YOUR NOTES AGE!! Immediately after the interview set aside some time to do a stream of consciousness recap. And

to clean up the obscure scrawl on your notes. Interviewing Excellence 25. Ask the interview if you can get back to her by phone tomorrow to fill in holes that your tin ear missed. NO MORE THAN TEN MINUTES. 26. LEARNING! Tag along with great interviewers in your organization. (I made three PBS films with a Director who had been Mike Wallaces director at 60 Minutesoh my God, how much I learnedor, rather, how little I learned: He could drag stuff out of people that you couldnt believe. (Secret: Im just a dumb old fart trying to figure out what goes on here. HELP ME. PLEASE.) 27. Work on your Level of Dis-satisfaction: BE MAD AS HELL

WHEN YOU SPENT 1.5 HOURS ON AN INTERVIEW WITHOUT REVALATIONS! 28. No, youre not FBIBUT YOU ARE HERE TO FERRET OUT THE NON-OBVIOUS. So: Keep Digging! (Think Woodward & Bernstein.) Interviewing Excellence 29. Repeat: INTERVIEWING IS A CRUCIALLY IMPORTANT ART. Study it! Work on it! Its no different than golf or underwater basketweaving. The more & harder you work, the better you get. 30. Yes, we need facts (e.g., stories), but remember always: INTERVIEWS ARE PURE & SIMPLE ABOUT EMOTIONAL INTERACTION! 31. Tom Wrap-up Note: FEW THINGS IN LIFE PISS ME OFF MORE

THAN GOING THROUGH SOMEONES INTERVIEW NOTES AND FINDING A DEARTH OF SOLID EVIDENCEexamples., stories, detailed process maps, etc. (I BLOODY HATE Generalizations!) (Think doctors office: Come hell & high water they start with weight, blood pressure, pulse.) Mastering Sales : The Sales25 Its true, I am a professional. I am a professional Salesperson. I spend 200 nights a

year on the road hawking ideas. Im proud to be a salesman, to join the company of Winston Churchill, the great Greek oratorsand the guys & gals who used to peddle whatever for Fuller Brush. Here I go again! We have a thousand course in business school on marketing. And at, at least, the prestigious schools nary a course on sales. Utterly ridiculous. In my presentations, I try ever so humbly, to bring Sales center stage. The two lists that follow (long, short) hardly fill the bill. They simply amount to a few ideas.

Everyone lives by selling something. Robert Louis Stevenson Great Salespeople 1. Know the product. (Find cool mentors, and use them.) 2. Know the company. 3. Know the customer. (Including the customers consultants.) (And especially the corporate culture.)

4. Love internal politics at home and abroad. 5. Religiously respect competitors. (No badmouthing, no matter how provoked.) 6. Wire the customers org. (Relationships at all levels & functions.) 7. Wire the home teams org. and vendors orgs. (INVEST Big Time time in relationships at all levels & functions.) (Take junior people in all functions to client meetings.) Its politics,

stupid! (Play or sit on the sidelines.) Great Salespeople 8. Never overpromise. (Even if it costs you your job.) 9. Sell only by solving problems-creating profitable opportunities. (Our product solves these problems, creates these unimagined INCREDIBLE opportunities, and will make you a ton of moneyheres exactly how.) (IS THIS A PRODUCT SALE OR A WOW-ORIGINAL SOLUTION YOULL BE DINING OFF 5 YEARS FROM NOW? THAT WILL BE WRITTEN UP IN THE TRADE PRESS?)

10. Will involve anybodyincluding mortal enemiesif it enhances the scope of the problem we can solve and increases the scope of the opportunity we can encompass. 11. Know the Brand Story cold; live the Brand Story. (If not, leave.) Great Salespeople 12. Think Turnkey. (Its always your problem!) 13. Act as orchestra conductor: You are responsible for making the whole-damn-network respond. (PERIOD.) 14. Help the customer get to know the vendors

organization & build up their Rolodex. 15. Walk away from bad business. (Even if it gets you fired.) 16. Understand the idea of a good loss. (A bold effort thats sometimes better than a lousy win.) 17. Think those who regularly say Its all a price issue suffer from rampant immaturity & shrunken imagination. 18. Will not give away the store to get a foot in the door. 19. Are wary & respectful of upstartsthe real enemy. 20. Seek several cool customerswholl drag you into Tomorrowland.

If you dont listen, you dont sell anything. Carolyn Marland/Managing Director/Guardian Group Great Salespeople 21. Use the word partnership obsessively, even though it is way overused. (Partnership includes folks at all levels throughout the supply chain.) 22. Send thank you notes by the truckload. (NOT E-NOTES.)

(Most are for little things.) (50% of those notes are sent to those in our company!) Remember birthdays. Use the word we. 23. When you look across the table at the customer, think religiously to yourself: HOW CAN I MAKE THIS DUDE RICH & FAMOUS & GET HIM-HER PROMOTED? 24. Great salespeople can affirmatively respond to the query in an HP banner ad: HAVE YOU CHANGED CIVILIZATION TODAY? 25. Keep your bloody PowerPoint slides simple! Three for the Ages

GETTING TO YES Roger Fisher, William Ury, Bruce Patton LEARNED OPTIMISM Martin Seligman CRUCIAL CONFRONTATIONS Kerry Patterson, Joseph Grenny, Ron McMillan, Al Switzler GE (more or less)

: The Sales122: 122 Ridiculously Obvious Thoughts About Selling Stuff Tom Peters/0402.2006 This list was first prepared for GE Energy sales & marketing people in January [2006]. It

started with a half-dozen items, and grew like Topsy. Possibly, given its origins, its a little tilted toward complex, engineering-based sales. Well, they are what they areand on second viewing most of them apply to most of us. Tom Peters 1. Strategy overrated, simply doin stuff underrated. See Kelleher and Bossidy: We have a strategic plan, its called

doing things.Herb Kelleher. Execution is a systematic process of rigorously discussing hows and whats, tenaciously following through, and ensuring accountability. Larry Bossidy & Ram Charan/ Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done. Action has its own logicask Genghis Khan, Rommel, COL John Boyd, U.S. Grant, Patton, W.T. Sherman. 2. What are you personally great at? (Key word: great.) Play to strengths! Distinct or Extinct. You should aim to be outrageously good/B.I.W. at a niche area (or more). 3. Are you a personality, a de facto brand in the industry? The Dr Phil of ... 4. Opportunism (with a little forethought) mostly wins.

(Successful people are the ones who are good at Plan B.) 5. Little starts can lead to big wins. Most true winnersthink search & Googlestart as something small. Many big deals Disney & Pixarcould have been done as little-er deals if youd had the guts to jump before the value became obvious. Everyone lives by selling something. Robert Louis Stevenson 6. Non-obvious targets have great potential. Among many

other things, everybody goes after the obvious ones. Also, the non-obvious are often good Partners for technology experiments. 7. The best relationships are often (usually?) not top to top! (Often the best: hungry division GMs eager to make a mark.) 8. ITS RELATIONSHIPS, STUPIDDEEP AND FROM MULTIPLE FUNCTIONS. 9. In any public-sector business, you must become an avid student of the politics, the incentives and constraints, mostly non-economic, facing all of the players. Politicians are usually incredibly logicalif you (deeply!) understand

the matrix in which they exist. 10. Relationships from within our firm are as important often more importantas those from outsideagain broad is as important as deep. Alliesavid supporters!within and from non-obvious places may be more important than relationships at the Client organization. Goal: an insanely unfair market share of insiders time devoted to your projects! C(I)>C(X )

11. Interesting outsiders are essential to innovative proposal and sales teams. An exciting sales-proposal team is as important as a prestigious one. 12. Is the proposal-sales team weird enoughweirdos come up with the most interesting, game-changer ideas. Period. 13. Lunch with at least one weirdo per month. (Goal: always on the prowl for interesting new stuff.) 14. Gratuitous comment: Lunches with good friends are typically a waste of (professional) time. 15. Dont short-change (time, money, depth) the proposal process. Miss one tiny nuance, one potential incentive that makes my day for a key Client playerand watch the

whole gig be torpedoed. 16. Sticking with it sometimes pays, sometimes notit takes a lot of tries to forge the best path in. Sometimes you never do, after a literal lifetime. (Ah, life.) 17. WOMEN ARE SIMPLY BETTER AT RELATIONSHIPSdont get hung upparticularly in tech firmson what industriescountries women cant do. (Or some such bullshit.) 18. Work incessantly on your storymost economic value springs from a good story (think Perrier)! In sensitive public or quasi-public negotiations, a compelling story is of immense valuepolitics is about the tension among competing stories. (If you dont believe me, ask Karl Rove or

James Carville.) (Storytelling is the core of culture. Branded Nation: The Marketing of Megachurch, College Inc., and Museumworld, James Twitchell) 19. Call this 18A, or 18 repeat: Become a first-rate Storyteller! (A key perhaps the key to leadership is the effective communication of a story.Howard Gardner, Leading Minds: An Anatomy of Leadership) 20. Risk Assessment & Risk Management is more about stories than advanced mathi.e., brilliant scenario construction. 21. Good listeners are good sales people. Period. 22. Lousy listeners are lousy sales people. Period.

23. GREAT LISTENERS ARE GREAT SALES PEOPLE. (Listening skills are hard to learn and subject to immense effort in pursuit of Mastery. A virtuoso listener is as rare as a virtuoso cello player.) (If you dont listen, you dont sell anything.Carolyn Marland/MD/Guardian Group) 24. Things that are funny to me (American) are often-mostly not funny to those in other cultures. (Humor is as fine-edged as it gets, and rarely travels.) 25. You dont know Jack Squat about other peoples cultures especially if you are a typically myopic American. (Like me.) 26. Are you a great interviewer? Its a make or break skill.

(Think Barbara Walters skill at extracting unwanted truths from pros in persona-protection ... in front of 10s of millions of people. 27. Are you a great (not merely good) presenter? Mastering presentation skills is a lifes workwith stupendous payoff. 28. Work like hell on the Big 2: LISTENING/INTERVIEWING, PRESENTING. These are the essence of [sales] lifeand usually picked-up in an amateurish fashion. Mistake! (Become a professional student of these two areas, achieve Mastery.) 29. Are you good at flowers? Think: FLOWER POWER! (see Harvey Mackays Mackay 66what you should know about a Client; e.g., birthdays & anniversaries.) (My flowers budget is

out of control. Hooray for me.) 30. You cant do it allbe clear at what you are good at, bad at, indifferent at. Hubris sucks. FLOWER POWER 31. The point is not to prove yourself. (Thats ego-talk.) Let the best person present to the Clientperhaps a lower level geek. (Control freaks get their just desserts in the long haul or sooner.) 32. The numbers will more or less take care of themselves over

the long haulif the relationship/s is/are solid gold. 33. The Gold Standard in selling: INDISPENSABLE to the Client. No other goal is worthy. 34. Never stop growing-broadening-deepening the relationship. The key to indispensability is to get the Client more and more and more and then more imbedded in our web. Hence the so-called selling process is only the first step! 35. USE THE WORD WE CONSTANTLY & RELIGIOUSLY! (E.g.: Wethe Client & meare going to change the world with this service.) 36. Dont waste your time on jerksitll rarely work out in the mid- to long-term.

37. Genius is walking away from lousy scores (deals)and accepting the attendant heat. Big Business is the premier home to Big Egos overpaying by a factor of 2 to 22 with billion$$$$ at stake. (Think Jerry Levin and AOL Time Warner.) If you dont listen, you dont sell anything. Carolyn Marland/ Managing Director/

38. You havent a clue as to how this situation will actually play outbe prepared to move fast in a different direction. 39. Keep your word. 40. KEEP YOUR WORD. 41. Underpromise (i.e., dont over-promise; i.e., cut yourself a little slack) even if it costs you businesswinning is a long-term affair. Over-promising is Sign #1 of a lack of integrity. You will pay the piper. 42. There is such a thing as a good lossif youve tested something new and developed good relationships. A half-dozen honorable, ingenious losses over a two-year period can pave the way for a Big Victory in a New Space in year 3.

43. Its a competitive world out there. New, innovative products are harder to sell than old stand-bys. Nonetheless, you will be a long-term star to the extent that you are willing to push the harder-to-sell-at-the-moment Innovative Products that cement long-term Client success (Indispensability!) even if it means a #s hit this quarter. PART OF YOUR JOB: TAKE CLIENTS ON AN ADVENTURE THAT PUTS THEM AHEAD OF THE GAME CALLED (GAMECHANGINGhopefully) COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE! You can make more friends in two months by becoming interested in

other people than you can in two years by trying to get other people interested in you. Dale Carnegie 44. Think legacywhat the hell is all this really about for you and the world? (Tell me, what is it you plan to do with your one wild and precious life? Mary Oliver) 45. THERE ARE NO MODERATES IN THE HISTORY BOOKS!

46. Keep it simple! (Damn it!) No matter how sophisticated the product. If you cant explain it in a phrase, a page, or to your 14-year-old ... you havent got it right yet. 47. Know more than the next guy. Homework pays. (of course its obviousbut in my work it is too often honored in the breach.) 48. Regardless of project size, winning or losing invariably hinges on a raft of little stuff. Little stuff is and always has been everything!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!or, one mans little stuff is another mans 7.6 Richter deal-breaker. 49. In public settings in particular, face saving is all. When something changes, allow the other guy to come out looking like

a winner, especially if he has lost. (Even if you must accept the egg on your facehe will always remember you!) 50. Dont hold grudges. (It is the ultimate in small mindedness and incredibly wasteful and ineffective. Theres always tomorrow.) 51. ITS ALWAYS THE POLITICSwee private-sector deal or giant public sector deal. (Every player, small or large, is angling for something. Master the calculus of advantage.) 52. To beat the turnover problem in key Client posts amidst long negotiations, invest outrageous amounts of time building a wide & deep set of relationships with mid-level (& lower!!)

plodding careerists. The invisible careerists are the bedrock upon which repeated success is built! (My Capitol Hill Axiom: Its the 24-year-old LA who in the end briefs the Senator right before she goes to the Floor to vote.) 53. Speaking of she: Gender differences are Enormous dealing with a woman and dealing with a man are different kettles of fishyou must become an A+ student of gender differences. (E.g.: Men are typically more interested in the short-term score. Women are more interested in the longterm consequences.) 54. LITTLE PEOPLE OFTEN HAVE BIG FRIENDS. 55. This is not war, damn it. All parties can win (or not lose, anyway). And losing bidders can walk away from a deal with

increased respect for you and your team. 56. Never, ever dump on a competitorthe Tom Watson IBM glory-days mantra. 57. Never forget the Law of Cousins! In developing nations in particular, power brokers at all levels are at least cousins! Consideration for a second cousin can pay off big time. 58. Speaking of favors, jail sucks. 59. Work hard beats work smart. (Mostly.) 60. REPEAT: HE/SHE WHO HAS THE MOST-BEST RELATIONSHIPS WINS. RELATIONSHIPS ARE THE ESSENCE OF THE WORK OF THE SALESPERSON. THE HARD ... AND LONG ...

WORK OF THE SALESPERSON. 61. Mano v mano hardball is seldom the answerend runs based and patient multi-level relationship building via deeperwider networks win. 62. If the deal is wired from below, truly wired, than the socalled big negotiations are essentially irrelevant. 63. If every quarter is a little better than the prior quarter then you are not taking any serious risks. 64. Phones beat email. Nothing is so contagious as enthusiasm.

Samuel Taylor Coleridge 65. A THREE-MINUTE CALL TODAY CAN AVOID A GAME-LOSER OF A FIASCO NEXT MONTH. There was always a time when a little thing could have been addressed that headed off a subsequent big thing. As to avoiding that call, didnt someone say, Pride goeth before the fall? 66. Be hyper-organized about relationship managementyou are in the anthropology business. Study the great pols! Brilliant NRM (network relationship management) is not accidental! It is not catch-as-catch can. (Football analogies are cutebut deep political understanding pays the private-school tuition.)

67. Obsess on ROIR (Return On Investment In Relationships). 68. THANK YOU NOTES: Worlds highest-return investment!! 69. The way to anyones heart: Doing a nice thing for their kid. (But, gawd, does this take a gentle touch.) 70. Scoring off other people is stupid. Winners are always in the business of creating the maximum # of winnersamong adversaries at least as much as among partners. 71. Your colleagues successes are your successes. Period. (Trust me, my greatest personal successfinancially as well as artisticallyhas been creating a bigger pond in which everyone wins, even if my market share is down.)

72. Lend a helping hand, especially when you dont have the time. E.g. share relationshipsthe more you give away the more you get in return (just like they say in church). 73. Listen up: It was much later that I realized Dads secret. He gained respect by giving it. He talked and listened to the fourth-grade kids in Spring Valley who shined shoes the same way he talked and listened to a bishop or a college president. He was seriously interested in who you were and what you had to say. Sara LawrenceLightfoot, Respect. (I.e., Respect is Cool.) 74. Mentoring is a thrilland the practical payoff is enormous. The best mentors have the whole world working its buns off for them!

75. Hire for enthusiasm. Promote for enthusiasm. Cherish enthusiasm. REMOVE NON-ENTHUSIASTSTHEY ARE CANCERS. (Nothing is so contagious as enthusiasm. Samuel Taylor Coleridge. A man without a smiling face must not open a shop.Chinese Proverb.) 76. ITS ALWAYS YOUR PROBLEMyou sold it to them. 77. Its never over: While there may be an excellent service activity in your company, the relationship belongs to You! Hence the aftersales moments of truth are at least asif not more than*--important to the Continuing Relationship as the sale transaction itself. (*I vote for more than.) Youll

get your biggest points with the Client for being an effective after-the-fact go-between with your company. 78. Dont get too hung up on systems integrationfirst & foremost, the individual bits have got to work. 79. For Gods sake dont over promise on systems integrationits nigh on impossible to deliver. 80. On the other hand winners clamber Up the Value-added Ladder, and offer ever so much more than mere product. ALL SUCCESSFUL SALES PEOPLE ARE IN THE SOLUTIONS BUSINESSno matter how jargony that may sound. 81. Systems / Solutions selling means grappling directly

with culture change in Client organizations. (The business of selling is not just about matching viable solutions to the customers that require them. Its equally about managing the change process the customer will need to go through to implement the solution and achieve the value promised by the solutionJeff Thull, The Prime Solution: Close the Value Gap, Increase Margins, and Win the Complex Sale) 82. Shit happens. Thats what they pay you for. 83. This is not a GE or Ben & Jerrys saleit is a Joe Jones/Jane Jones sale. YOU ARE THE BRAND THE CLIENT BUYS especially over the long haul. 84. Duh: You make money, the company makes moneyon

repeat business. 85. Masteryes, youthe PR Game. Word of Mouth is not accidental! You want Word of Mouth? Make it happen! 86. GOAL #1: MAKE YOUR CLIENT A HEROYOU ARE NOT THERE TO GET CREDIT. (Taking credit is for egomaniacs. And losers.) 87. Decent margins, over the mid- to long-term, are a product of better relationships, not better negotiating skill. (Mostly.) You cant behave in a calm, rational manner. Youve got to be out there on

the lunatic fringe. Jack Welch 88. In the immortal words of ex-GE Vice Chairman Larry Bossidy, more or less, Realism rocks. (Bullshit artist and great salesperson, contrary to conventional wisdom, are Diametric Opposites. Truthteller and Great Salesperson is more like it.) 89. Be the first to tell the Client bad news (e.g., slipped delivery); his intelligence sources will tell him fastyou want to be there first with your story and to enhance your rep as Truthteller!

90. Work like hell to get a reputation as a valued industry expert, to become an industry resource. 91. Work the Trade Association angle for all its worthit may take a decade to pay offe.g., when you become an officer or are on an important panel or testify Before Congress. 92. PAY YOUR DUES IN THE CLIENT ORG AND IN YOUR OWN ORG! 93. Its all bloody tactics. 94. You must ... LOVE .... the product! (Period.) 95. YOU MUST LOVE THE PRODUCT! 96. Dont over-schedule. Running late is inexcusable at any level of seniority; it is the ultimate mark of self-importance mixed with contempt.

97. Women are better salespeople. (See Addendum.) 98. Women alone understand Women. 99. Actually, Women by and large understand Men better than Men understand Men. 100.Women purchasers buy Stories and recommendations. 101. Women take longer to become Loyal purchasers, but then stay Loyal. 102. Men buy Stats. 103. Men decide fast, but are fickle. 104. Men & Women are VERY, VERY Different. 105. Women buy most things. Consumer. Increasingly,

professional goods and services. 106. Womens Market is Opportunity #1. 107. Boomers. Many, many. Lots & lots & lots of $$$. 108. Boomers-Geezers are very different purchasers than those in other categories. Women Rock as Salespersons (From Item #97.) And the answers are? TAKE THIS QUICK QUIZ: Who manages more things at once? Who puts more effort into their appearance? Who usually takes care of the details? Who finds it easier to meet new people? Who asks more questions

in a conversation? Who is a better listener? Who has more interest in communication skills? Who is more inclined to get involved? Who encourages harmony and agreement? Who has better intuition? Who works with a longer to do list? Who enjoys a recap to the days events? Who is better at keeping in touch with others? Source: Selling Is a Womans Game: 15 Powerful Reasons Why Women Can Outsell Men, Nicki Joy & Susan Kane-Benson 109. It takes time to get to know people. (DUH.) 110. The very idea of efficiency in relationship

development is ... STUPID. 111. MBWA (still) rules. 112. Preparing the soil is the first 98 percent. (Or more.) 113. WORK THE PHONES! 114. Rule 5K-5M: 5K miles for a 5-Minute meeting often makes sense. (Yes, often.) (Even with constrained travel budgets.) (Thanks, super-agent Mark McCormack.) 115. Become a student! Study great salespeople! (Including Presidents.) (Natural is a little bit truebut then Naturals are always the ones who study hardest e.g., Jerry Rice.)

116. Become a student! Yes, you can study Relationship Building. So, study 117. Beware complexifiers and complicators. (Truly smart people ... Simplify things.) 118. The smartest guy in the room rarely winsalas, he usually is aware hes the smartest guy. (And neednt waste his time on that soft relationship crap.) 119. Be kind. It works. 120. Be especially kind when there are screw-ups. (Theres plenty of time later to Play the Great

Accountability Game.) 121. Presidents never tire of being treated like Presidents. 122. Luck matters. Good luck! Never forget implementation , boys. In our work, its what I call the last 98

percent of the client puzzle. Al McDonald, former Managing Director, McKinsey & Co, to a project team, reported by subsequent McKinsey MD, Ron Daniel Tom Peters On Implementation The Have You 50 MBWA/Calendars Never Lie Hard Is Soft. Soft Is Hard. Respect!

The Last 98%: 50 Equations Concerning Success Organizations Exist to Serve The 9Ps of Leadership Women Dominate the Economy: Implications for Implementation Women Rule: Implications for Implementation The XF-50: Enhancing Cross-functional Effectiveness Beyond Barriers: The PSF/Professional Service Firm Solution Beyond Barriers: The PSF 35 Getting Things Done: The Power & Implementation 34 The Checklist: The Power of a Blinding Flash of the Obvious Charlie Wilsons War: Lessons Learned Delivering Development Assistance Effectively: William Easterly

The Creation of the U.S. Constitution: The Summer of 1787 Excellence 4/40: 4 Ideas in 40 Years Excellence 1/40, 1 Idea in 40 Years: Try It! Presentation Excellence: The PresX56 Interviewing Excellence: The IntX31 Mastering Sales: The Sales25 The Sales122: 122 Ridiculously Obvious Thoughts About Selling Stuff END Part 7

Recently Viewed Presentations

  • Memorial - PBworks

    Memorial - PBworks

    This poem is an elegy, a poem or song that is a lament for the dead, for a beloved person in MacCaig's life. That person is probably MacCaig's sister, Frances, who died in 1968 as this poem was published in...
  • Using Images on Your Website? - pacounties.org

    Using Images on Your Website? - pacounties.org

    - Crop, rotate, resize, colorize, add text and more with this very basic tool. Go to Start > All Programs > Accessories > Paint Vista/Win7 shortcut: type mspaint in the search bar on the start menu.
  • Bellwork: Begin reading text and answer first two questions.

    Bellwork: Begin reading text and answer first two questions.

    The railroads had gone on combining till a few great syndicates controlled every rail in the land. In manufactories, every important staple was controlled by a syndicate. These syndicates, pools, trusts, or whatever their name, fixed prices and crushed all...
  • Benford&#x27;s Law of First Digits and the Mass of Exoplanets ...

    Benford's Law of First Digits and the Mass of Exoplanets ...

    Benford's Law of First Digits and the Mass of ExoplanetsThomas W. Hair, Ph.D.Florida Gulf Coast University ... Kepler is designed to orbit the sun in the gravitationally stable LaGrange Point 2 (L2) some 1,500,000km from Earth and constantly stare at...
  • Funded by the NIFA-AFRI CAP Program - 2017-68005-26867.

    Funded by the NIFA-AFRI CAP Program - 2017-68005-26867.

    Funded by the NIFA-AFRI CAP Program - 2017-68005-26867.Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
  • Science, Engineering - Pravin Kolhe&#x27;s Website: Home Page

    Science, Engineering - Pravin Kolhe's Website: Home Page

    Engineering Profession. Engineer earns from Prosperity. Birth Anniversary of Sir MokshagundamVisvesvarayyais celebrated as Engineers day. He was a Civil Engineer
  • Using Wikipedia to Re-envision the Term Paper

    Using Wikipedia to Re-envision the Term Paper

    Using Wikipedia to Re-envision the Term Paper Martha Groom IAS Faculty Andreas Brockhaus, Manager Learning Technologies University of Washington Bothell
  • Web Time Entry & Approval Training Josh Hewitt

    Web Time Entry & Approval Training Josh Hewitt

    WebAdvisor is the portal of the web functions that enables Web users to view their individual information contained in your institution's Colleague databases. WebAdvisor consists of the forms that enable you to extract and deliver information from the database to...