Writing about the Inspector using quotes/themes

Writing about the Inspector using quotes/themes

What sort of words describe Mr Birling? What is his personality like? What sort of words describe Mrs Birling? What is her personality like? What sort of words describe Sheila? What is her personality like?

What sort of words describe Eric? What is his personality like? What sort of words describe Gerald? What is his personality like? What sort of words describe the Inspector? What is his personality like? Nobody wants war"

Who says this? What does it mean? What themes does it link to? What is the writer suggesting? But these girls arent cheap labour. Theyre

people Who says this? What does it mean? What themes does it link to? What is the writer suggesting?

it frightens me the way you talk Who says this? What does it mean? What themes does it link to? What is the writer suggesting?

I felt rotten about it at the time and now I feel a lot worse Who says this? What does it mean? What themes does it link to? What is the writer suggesting?

as if we were all mixed up together like bees in a hive community and all that nonsense Who says this? What does it mean? What themes does it link to?

What is the writer suggesting? the time will soon come when if man wont learn that lesson he will be taught it in fire, blood and anguish Who says this?

What does it mean? What themes does it link to? What is the writer suggesting? Girls of that class Who says this?

What does it mean? What themes does it link to? What is the writer suggesting? We are all members of one body Who says this?

What does it mean? What themes does it link to? What is the writer suggesting? I did nothing Im ashamed of Who says this?

What does it mean? What themes does it link to? What is the writer suggesting? We often do on the young ones. Theyre more impressionable

Who says this? What does it mean? What themes does it link to? What is the writer suggesting? its better to ask for the earth than to take it

Who says this? What does it mean? What themes does it link to? What is the writer suggesting? What is dramatic irony? Why is it important? When was the play set? When was it written/performed? What did the writer think about the class systems of the time?

The Inspectors final speech: But just remember this. One Eva Smith has gone - but there are millions and millions and millions of Eva Smiths and John Smiths left with us, with their lives, their hopes and fears, their suffering and a chance of happiness, all intertwined with our lives and what we think and say and do. We don't live alone. We are members of one body. We are responsible for each other. And I tell you that the time will soon come when, if men will not learn that lesson, then they will be taught in

fire and blood and anguish. Goodnight. Key Themes Comments Responsibility (social and personal) Personal responsibility is about accepting the consequences of your actions. Social responsibility is about trying to build a

better society for everyone The idea of running a society in a more equal way where class divisions arent as important Running a society based upon making money and with harsh divides between classes in society The separation between the rich and poor in society How the young become more socialist by the end, but the old remain capitalist

Socialism Capitalism Class system Generation Gap Writing about the Inspector using quotes/themes: The Inspector tries to warn the family that their selfish behaviour is affecting other people in society. He

tells them that they are all members of one body and need to be socially responsible with their actions. This can also be seen as the inspector promoting socialism as a more fair and balanced way of running society, which is what Priestley himself also believe. The Inspector suggests that Eva Smith is not the only poor person who is

suffering at the hands of the rich. He tells the Birlings that there This Mrs Birling: I wish I'd been here when that man first arrived. I'd have asked him a few questions before I allowed him to ask us any. Sheila: It's all right saying that now. Mrs Birling: I was the only one of you who didn't give in to him. And now I say we must discuss this business quietly and sensibly and decide if there's anything to be done about it. Birling: (with hearty approval) You're absolutely right, my dear. Already we've discovered one important fact that that fellow was a fraud and we've been hoaxed and that may not be the end of it by any means.

Gerald: I'm sure it isn't. Birling: (keenly interested) You are, eh? Good! ( To Eric, who is restless.) Eric, sit down. Eric: ( sulkily) I'm all right. Birling: All right? You're anything but all right. And you needn't stand there as if as if Eric: As if what? Birling: As if you'd nothing to do with us. Just remember your own position, young man. If anybody's up to the neck in this business, you are, so you'd better take some interest in it. Eric: I do take some interest in it. I take too much, that's my trouble. Sheila: It's mine too. Birling: Now listen, you two. If you're still feeling on edge, then the least you can do is to keep quiet. Leave this to us. I'll admit that fellow's antics rattled us a bit. But we've found him out and all we have to do is to keep our heads. Now it's our turn.

Sheila: Our turn to do what? Mrs Birling: ( sharply) To behave sensibly, Sheila which is more than you're doing. Eric: ( bursting out) What's the use of talking about behaving sensibly. You're beginning to pretend now that nothing's really happened at all. And I can't see it like that. This girl's still dead, isn't she? Nobody's brought her to life, have they? Sheila: (eagerly) That's just what I feel, Eric. And it's what they don't seem to understand. Mrs Birling: I wish I'd been here when that man first arrived. I'd have asked him a few questions before I allowed him to ask us any. Sheila: It's all right saying that now. Mrs Birling: I was the only one of you who didn't give in to him. And now I say we must discuss this business quietly and sensibly and decide if there's anything to be done about it. Birling: (with hearty approval) You're absolutely right, my dear. Already we've discovered one important fact that that fellow was a fraud and we've been hoaxed and that

may not be the end of it by any means. Gerald: I'm sure it isn't. Birling: (keenly interested) You are, eh? Good! ( To Eric, who is restless.) Eric, sit down. Eric: ( sulkily) I'm all right. Birling: All right? You're anything but all right. And you needn't stand there as if as if Eric: As if what? Birling: As if you'd nothing to do with us. Just remember your own position, young man. If anybody's up to the neck in this business, you are, so you'd better take some interest in it. Eric: I do take some interest in it. I take too much, that's my trouble. Sheila: It's mine too. Birling: Now listen, you two. If you're still feeling on edge, then the least you can do is to keep quiet. Leave this to us. I'll admit that fellow's antics rattled us a bit. But we've

found him out and all we have to do is to keep our heads. Now it's our turn. Sheila: Our turn to do what? Mrs Birling: ( sharply) To behave sensibly, Sheila which is more than you're doing. Eric: ( bursting out) What's the use of talking about behaving sensibly. You're beginning to pretend now that nothing's really happened at all. And I can't see it like that. This girl's still dead, isn't she? Nobody's brought her to life, have they? Sheila: (eagerly) That's just what I feel, Eric. And it's what they don't seem to understand. A Christmas Carol What sort of words describe Scrooge? What is his personality like?

What sort of words describe Tiny Tim? What is his personality like? What sort of words describe Fred? What is his personality like? Why is Jacob Marley important to the story?

What are the purposes of the 3 ghosts? What messages does Dickens want to send to Victorian society? Why does Dickens sympathise with the poor so much? Mankind was my business. The common welfare was my business; charity, mercy,

forbearance, benevolence, were all my business. The dealings of my trade were but a drop of water in the comprehensive ocean of my business! "'I will honour Christmas in my heart, and try to keep it all the year. I will live in the Past, the Present, and the Future. The Spirits of all Three shall strive within me.'"

"I am not the man I was. I will not be the man I must have been but for this intercourse. Why show me this, if I am past all hope?'" "They are Mans!... This boy is Ignorance. This girl is Want. "Oh no, kind spirit. Say he will be spared. What did the writer think about the class

systems of the time? Why did Dickens have sympathy for the poor? What did A Christmas Carol the book do to the celebrations of Christmas in England? Key Themes Comments Redemption (change)

Scrooges transformation from cold-feeling, selfish miser into kind-hearted, generous, caring community man The idea of the book representing good Christian values which Dickens thought people were too often neglecting The idea of becoming a better person because of realising the errors of your ways The separation between the rich and poor in society

Christmas spirit (Christianity) Regret/guilt Class system Scrooge at the start Scrooge in the middle Scrooge at the end

Rejects human contact unless absolutely necessary Selfish and inwardlooking Likes to make money Doesnt like to spend money Treats the poor badly (no donations, low wage for Bob Cratchit) Doesnt believe in the

Christmas spirit Views the poor as lazy and a drain on society Fears Marleys ghost and what it means for him Emotionally affected by seeing the Cratchit Christmas Begins to feel sympathy for Tiny Tim

Is shown how he used to be a better person Is shown how breaking up with Belle made him more bitter & selfish Begs for a chance to change his ways Wants to avoid his lonely fate Re-discovers his old

personality Lives in the spirit of Christmas Becomes a second father to Tiny Tim Makes amends with the charity workers, buys the Cratchits a huge turkey and raises Bobs salary From the foldings of its robe, it brought two children; wretched, abject, frightful, hideous, miserable. They knelt

down at its feet, and clung upon the outside of its garment. "Oh, Man, look here! Look, look, down here!" exclaimed the Ghost. They were a boy and a girl. Yellow, meagre, ragged, scowling, wolfish; but prostrate, too, in their humility. Where graceful youth should have filled their features out, and touched them with its freshest tints, a stale and shrivelled hand, like that of age, had pinched, and twisted them, and pulled them into shreds. Where angels might have sat enthroned, devils lurked, and glared out menacing. No change, no degradation, no perversion of humanity, in any grade, through all the mysteries of wonderful creation, has monsters half so horrible and dread. Scrooge started back, appalled. Having them shown to him in this way, he tried to say they were fine children, but the words choked themselves, rather than be parties to a lie of such enormous magnitude. "Spirit, are they yours?" Scrooge could say no more.

"They are Man's," said the Spirit, looking down upon them. "And they cling to me, appealing from their fathers. This boy is Ignorance. This girl is Want. Beware them both, and all of their degree, but most of all beware this boy, for on his brow I see that written which is Doom, unless the writing be erased. Deny it!" cried the Spirit, stretching out its hand towards the city. "Slander those who tell it ye. Admit it for your factious purposes, and make it worse. And abide the end." "Have they no refuge or resource?" cried Scrooge. "Are there no prisons?" said the Spirit, turning on him for the last time with his own words. "Are there no workhouses?" The bell struck twelve. Scrooge looked about him for the Ghost, and saw it not. As the last stroke ceased to vibrate, he remembered the prediction of old Jacob Marley, and lifting up his eyes, beheld a solemn Phantom, draped and hooded, coming,

like a mist along the ground, towards him. From the foldings of its robe, it brought two children; wretched, abject, frightful, hideous, miserable. They knelt down at its feet, and clung upon the outside of its garment. "Oh, Man, look here! Look, look, down here!" exclaimed the Ghost. They were a boy and a girl. Yellow, meagre, ragged, scowling, wolfish; but prostrate, too, in their humility. Where graceful youth should have filled their features out, and touched them with its freshest tints, a stale and shrivelled hand, like that of age, had pinched, and twisted them, and pulled them into shreds. Where angels might have sat enthroned, devils lurked, and glared out menacing. No change, no degradation, no perversion of humanity, in any grade, through all the mysteries of wonderful creation, has monsters half so horrible and dread.

Scrooge started back, appalled. Having them shown to him in this way, he tried to say they were fine children, but the words choked themselves, rather than be parties to a lie of such enormous magnitude. "Spirit, are they yours?" Scrooge could say no more. "They are Man's," said the Spirit, looking down upon them. "And they cling to me, appealing from their fathers. This boy is Ignorance. This girl is Want. Beware them both, and all of their degree, but most of all beware this boy, for on his brow I see that written which is Doom, unless the writing be erased. Deny it!" cried the Spirit, stretching out its hand towards the city. "Slander those who tell it ye. Admit it for your factious purposes, and make it worse. And abide the end." "Have they no refuge or resource?" cried Scrooge. "Are there no prisons?" said the Spirit, turning on him for the last time with his own words. "Are there no workhouses?"

The bell struck twelve. Scrooge looked about him for the Ghost, and saw it not. As the last stroke ceased to vibrate, he remembered the prediction of old Jacob Marley, and lifting up his eyes, beheld a solemn Phantom, draped and hooded, coming, like a mist along the ground, towards him. Whats the story of each poem? Use: WHO WHAT WHEN

WHERE WHY And turn these into an introductory paragraph in your answer. Then highlight quotations which pick out imagery/feelings which are relevant to the above. Overheard in County Sligo:

What does the writer think about marriage in the poem? How does the woman feel about her life? What feelings does she experience in general? What do you notice about the structure (stanzas, lines, rhythmn, etc.)? How can this be linked to its content? Woman Work:

What do you notice about the title? What does it say about life for women in this part of the world? How does the structure change in the poem? Why? How can this link to content? Whats the other topic discussed apart from work? Why? How does she feel about her life and this other topic? Comparison: Both poems explore women and their lives in relation to work. They both wish their lives

were different either that they could have achieved their dreams, or that they had time to relax and to enjoy the world and nature, rather than being consumed by boring, mundane work. In WW the writer lists all of the jobs she has to do which are all very domestic and traditional in terms of the role of a woman. She talks about .. and she seems to feel . Whereas in OICS the writer talks about the dreams she used to have in comparison to the life she now leads. She uses words like . to .. And she seems to think that .

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